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Warning, adult content. "Intervention."

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by Brensdad, Apr 27, 2009.

  1. Brensdad

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    I'm sure many of you have seen the episode of Intervention with the 21 year old non-compliant type 1. I am seeing it for the first time, and it is absolutely heartbreaking. I expected to see this kid that was full of ego and was just a jerk. After just 30 minutes, I see how he was alienated from other kids, even though he tried, as a kid. And then in high school his girlfriend left him, and he became immediately non-compliant.

    Just now there was a part where he was supposed to meet up with some "friends" from work, and they ended up ditching him and leaving him at the restaurant by himself. It was so sad to see him sitting there alone, calling them to see if they were coming. And then to see how much his mom was suffering.

    I'm not quite sure what to make of it all just yet, other than to feel reinforced that we are doing the right thing by letting her live her life as normally as possible and adopting whatever technology is necessary to make her diabetes as minimally invasive as possible.

    I don't know, you just do all you can and hope for the best.
     
  2. bgallini

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    I watched that when it first came out. Yes it was heart breaking!! I don't think the social stuff was so much b/c of D but it gets me teary eyed just thinking of that show. He was so, so thin....scary thin.
     
  3. Flutterby

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    That sounds really sad.. I have a friend at work who's boyfriend is type 1.. he tells me these stories are that completely horrific.. I've told him that if he needs my help to just say so.. The boyfriend has been without lantus for days at a time because no one would go get his insulin.. the dad is type 1 as well, but wouldn't 'share' his insulin with him.. He's also said to my friend that 'if I pass out just give me this shot (glucagon)..'.. my heart breaks for this kid (he's 18/19) and clearly has not had a very good upbringing, doesn't take D seriously and doesn't know how to get his own prescriptions.. stories like this just rip my heart out..

    my sister just called about an hour ago, she has a friend who's best friend is T1.. they found him today laying on his basement floor, no one had seen him in a few days.. his bg was 17 and his body temp was 84.. he's in the hospital right now.. no one knows what happened and how long he was actually like that..

    sorry to highjack your threat.. I'm hoping its safe to put these to stories in here since it say 'adult content' on the title.. I didn't want to start a thread with these but needed to get them off my chest..
     
  4. bgallini

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    Kim,

    That IS very scary. I can see why you want to get it off your chest. I hope he'll be okay. And I hope the bf of your coworker can get his act together. :(
     
  5. hughsfan30

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    I just got done watching it on youtube it is scary and sad, reminded me of my brother when he was first dianosed at 21, he was too embarrassed to tell anyone and therefore didnt take care of himself, noe he has diabetic neuropathy.
    Personally I am going to show it to Jacob, I think he could learn alot.
     
  6. yeswe'rebothD

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    I am in full agreement with you, Nick, on the need to keep D as minimally invasive as possible. However, I think there's another side to it.

    I never much felt like I belonged to any one group. Growing up, I was not a skinny, popular girl, but the skinny, popular girls didn't exactly shun me either (how could they, I was their Avon lady. No, seriously- I was!). I had lots of good friends and a few great ones.

    I feel like my mother gave me a positive outlook on diabetes that helped me not ever think to hide it. I enjoyed having something that made me different. I'm certain that circumstances are different for young men, but there is so much that a parent can do to influence their child's self-esteem that any diagnosis is taken in stride.

    Perhaps another side of why so many young people ignore their D or want to hide it, is the stigma involved with the beliefs that if you have diabetes, you must be fat, unhealthy, out of control, etc etc.

    In other words, things can improve all around-- we as parents have such a HUGE responsibility to help our children integrate D into their lives as seamlessly or as noticeably as the child's personality meshes with. Society has a responsibility to learn the differences and quit stereotyping according to those differences.

    This is as much about giving them an identity beyond diabetes as it is about giving them a foot up on self care in the future.
     
  7. danismom79

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    There was another Intervention episode about a girl who was using her insulin syringes for heroin. So the drug addiction was the focus, but they did show the parents asking if she'd had her insulin, and at one point the girl called the hospital because she thought she was going into DKA.
     
  8. Mom2Deacon

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    So how do we keep our kids from going through this?

    I am worried that Deacon is going to go through a rebellious stage about his diabetes.

    --Sara
     
  9. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Ok, I may be wrong, but I seem to recall that this kid was not doing all that well emotionally prior to his dx with D. If I have the right show, and the one I saw was a while ago, D seemed like the least of his problems. Yes, D in teens can be really tough but this is a TV show designed to showcase extremes and dysfunction and isn't really representative of all or even many teens living with D.
     
  10. Christopher

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    I think you try and set good examples with your own behavior, try and set up habits that he will incorporate as part of his daily routine, teach responsibility, trust, and living a healthy, fun lifestyle and then cross your fingers and pray really hard! But seriously, all kids are going to go through rebellious phases. Hopefully if he feels that diabetes care is a non negotiable, must-do part of his life he will choose to have purple hair as his rebellion and you will have to pick your battles. Hopefully some parents with grown children will chime in with better advice than I have given. :eek:
     
  11. Brensdad

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    That's the same one, and that's what was so sad to me. His diabetes care suffered because he struggled socially.
     
  12. OSUMom

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    I saw the Intervention show when it first came out. As I think back to it, his problems really were bigger than his type 1. He had untreated clinical depression in my opinion. His relationship with his dad was difficult too if I remember correctly.

    I think it's important to be supportive of your teenagers, listen, listen and listen when they will talk - and I know that's not very often, but they will talk when they're ready. Supportive does not mean not setting boundaries - curfews and rules - this is not popular. :p Clear communication, consequences, and consistency. I've never been afraid to seek professional help when something wasn't working for us or a problem seemed to be bigger than what we could handle.

    The scene at school and with friends can be brutal! To have a family and extended family that they know are there for them no matter what gives our kids a firm foundation and self-confidence I think. I know when my son was diagnosed at the end of his senior year in high school he felt good about himself so even though type 1 made him different for sure he was self confident. He was the brundt (spelling?) of some mean comments, but he knew who he was - he has a firm foundation of love and support and always will have that. This is what you are instilling in your kids from birth, and by those teenage years they know you're there for them. :cwds::cwds:
     
  13. RosemaryCinNJ

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    His Dad wont share his insulin?? My god I would rip out my own pancreas if I could and give it to Amanda!!!
     
  14. Ali

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    As someone diagnosed as a teen (now all "grown up") and a rebellious teen at that this is my 2 cents. Try to make life mainly about the non d stuff. Try and set up as easy and predictable way of dealing with diabetes for your teen as you can, even if it means a few years of higher A1c, try and get your childs Endo to step up in terms of telling your teen what to do, do not punish poor results, work really hard with how he whats to handle his D to make it work for him/her. You want to try and avoid the kid resorting to just not taking insulin, just not testing at all, drinking without working out a plan, getting secretive. Good luck to all you parents.:eek:Ali
     

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