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Violent Highs anyone? Scared ...

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by cnelson5266, Jul 19, 2011.

  1. cnelson5266

    cnelson5266 New Member

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    My daughter, 17, has complete personality changes when her number is really high (350-500). Today was the worst ever, with verbal abuse, cursing, and an unbelievable rage. I am so scared - she is violent with me and today our animals as well. She called the police herself today because she was so afraid of her behavior and ended up in the hospital until her numbers came down. She then apoligizes and acts as though nothing has happened. I have tried researching this and have found no real insights/information. She has adimitted that she is once again keeping her numbers on the high side to try to lose weight. I am at wits end ... I am worried for her and our entire family. Has anyone ever experienced anything like this? Advice?
     
  2. maryellen816

    maryellen816 Approved members

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    I am so sorry this is happening.

    Highs make my daughter angry and have a short fuse too. I can see her holding it in and seething inside, biting her tongue. When she was younger, she used to occaisionally blow up but we stopped that. She could leave the room if she felt she couldn't hold her tongue. You have to put your daughter on notice that you won't ever accept violent behavior again and offer her an alternative such as going to her room and screaming into a towel or something.

    I think you need to make a plan for with her for you to temporarily take over her care. You give her the long acting shot and you give her a shot for every meal. She needs to hold out a finger every time you want to test her and you give her a correction shot. If there is a meal that you can't give a shot for because you are at work, then she needs to do it and if she can't then when you get home, you will test and correct. You will test at night and correct. She should not have the privilage of going out if she doesn't get a shot for any food she eats while out. As she starts to feel better from being in range her behavior should be better and she should come to a point where she can gradually start taking over her own care properly.

    She also needs counseling. On the homepage is a counselor to contact - Joe.
     
  3. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

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    First, yes, we see rage when he is high, but not to the level you are describing, that sounds very frightening for you, I can't imagine. My son definitely has anger, outbursts, and difficulty controlling his emotions but he has never physically acted out, that would require some limits and consequences in our home if he ever did.

    When she's calm/in range, etc, does she recognize how completely inappropriately she acted? This will sound weird, but my younger daughter (non d) has pretty major temper tantrums and the ONLY way we could curb it was to video them and show them to her when she was calm. I kept the camera at the ready and at any sign of temper I started it. It displayed to her how out of character she was acting and how childish it was and she was/is now able to rein it in and leave the room.

    I would make some consequences (in a calm/in range moment) for the next time it happens, even make a code word that means LEAVE THIS ROOM NOW. She needs to understand that even if the rage is from the high, the actions are not acceptable and you will not tolerate it. She needs to know that when she feels that anger that she needs to be alone in her room. Make sure she does not have access to the car or is around animals. If she does not follow this (going to her room or other designated safe spot alone) then there is some important consequence (no time with friends, phone gone, whatever) that happens once things calm down.

    Secondly, you need to deal with the running high issue and NOW. IMO she needs professional help for that, going high to lose weight is very very dangerous and is something I wouldn't feel equipped to deal with alone. I would start with my CDE and find a good counselor for her. I would personally be taking over D management for her as she is displaying that she can't be trusted with it right now. She's displaying a lot of immature behavior and in our home the consequence to that is you are treated as a younger person would be.

    She's putting her health at great risk right now. We have an agreement in our home that as long as you are managing your health in a satisfactory way (not perfect, but good general health both short and long term) then we trust you to manage it on your own. When that becomes untrue we will take over if we need to.

    I'm sorry for all your difficulties, it sounds really scary to deal with. I'm hopeful that once you manage the D better together the rages will subside. The real solution to anger when high is to keep her in range, but that's tricky at this age and I do understand that very well. Good luck, keep us updated.
     
  4. TheFormerLantusFiend

    TheFormerLantusFiend Approved members

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    That she is also trying to stay high is a problem; I think it's doable to stay below 350 for the vast majority of the time. I would wonder if the highs are simply unmasking a mood disorder, particularly because she thinks it is worth going high to lose weight.

    Personally, I get cranky when I'm sick, and will get cranky with a high if I stay high for a long time. I was pretty cranky prior to my diabetes diagnosis and I did have a couple of violent outbursts. I physically hurt a person for no good reason about two weeks before I was diagnosed, in a way that's not at all characteristic of me.
    But I have not spent more than a short time above three hundred since before diagnosis. I do go up that high sometimes- but I come back down usually before I even feel it, and always before it makes me feel anything other than thirsty and tired.
     
  5. obtainedmist

    obtainedmist Approved members

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    I'm sure this is scary for the whole family. As others have mentioned, I would get some professional help with the eating disorder and anger management as soon as possible. We tend to blame everything on type 1, but violent behavior is likely to be more than running high.
     
  6. lauraqofu

    lauraqofu Approved members

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    I have to agree with Lantus Fiend in wondering if the highs are simply unmasking a mood disorder. Is she volatile at other times? I would imagine that in the midst of the hormonal hurricane that is teenage girl (and a Type 1 teenage girl, at that) it's hard to be on alert for clues that something bigger might be happening. Anger to the point of violence really sounds indicative of something bigger.

    And like the others said...the running high to lose weight needs to be stopped now. You need to lay down the law, take control again...and she needs to see a councilor who specializes in eating disorders. this eating disorder scares me more than anorexia or bulimia...because it can get deadly so quickly, not to mention the long term damage she's doing to her self. The sooner a person with an eating disorder is diagnosed and gets treatment, the better chance she has of real rehabilitation.
     
  7. cnelson5266

    cnelson5266 New Member

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    Thanks to all that replied ...

    Thanks so much for your replies. Nicole has since seen a psychologist who is also a type 1 diabetic. The mood disorder camp was spot on and she is being evaluated for it (Intermittent Explosive Disorder). She is currently on Pristiq for what we thought was depression - she wasn't taking that either. So here we are ... she will be evaluated weekly and in order to continue cheer she needs to show me her meter nightly ... it's a start. What a wonderful community to find. It's such a scary road, as unfortunate as it is ... we are not alone.
     
  8. Victoria!

    Victoria! Approved members

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    Excellent news! Glad to hear she is getting help! Hang in there!
     

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