- advertisement -

Video teens talking about reality and struggles with the diabetes

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by Ellen, Dec 14, 2010.

  1. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    8,240
    http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=1760931190118

    Nikki & Alyssa Tell it like it is Diabetes & Teenagers [HD]
    Nikki & Alyssa have an honest discussion about how they are managing their diabetes and how their doctor appointments have been and what they fear, teenagers helping teenagers.
     
  2. wilf

    wilf Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2007
    Messages:
    9,652
    I'm not sure I would show this to my teen. The honesty is refreshing, but the example being set is poor.
     
  3. Lee

    Lee Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Messages:
    9,633
    WIlf, I agree with you 100%! These girls can't be more then 13.

    I guess my question is - why do the parents not know this prior to the endo? Why are the parents not aware that the kid is only testing once a day? Not changing sites???? Running so high?

    It is good that the kids are realizing that they feel better when in range, but how long will that last?
     
  4. Jensmami

    Jensmami Approved members

    Joined:
    May 17, 2007
    Messages:
    2,082
    I agree, it is great that they try to change things, however I don't think my DD needs to see this. My DD is 13 too and very responsible, however every night I check her pump and her meter. The purpose for me is to see if I need to make any changes. However my motto for raising a teenager is "trust is good, but control is better". :p
     
  5. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    8,240
    I think this is a reality for many teens and it is important for parents to be aware and to stay involved. It may be beneficial too to discuss things like this with your teen so they know how to handle things when they meet others who struggle as these girls do. You all raise important points. Do you recall the very open and honest post by Moira at DiabetesMine: Teens with Diabetes: Freedom is their Drug http://www.diabetesmine.com/2010/02/teens-with-diabete.html and the comments too, which has been posted on the forums before.
     
  6. Bigbluefrog

    Bigbluefrog Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2010
    Messages:
    563
    I agree with you! Why were the parents unaware?

    I hope this is not the norm for teens, because we are going to see long term complications rise.

    I don't know many teens w d to really say
    that it is common behavior. My dd thought this video was sad that one was throwing up and the other was having health issues.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2010
  7. Bigbluefrog

    Bigbluefrog Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2010
    Messages:
    563
    Great story, is it freedom drug. Or denial? OK time to look at my dd pump download.....you never know when d burnout could happen.
     
  8. Lee

    Lee Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Messages:
    9,633
    Unfortunately, I know a teen exactly like this. Her parents are unaware or uninterested...me and my daughter talk about her quite a bit because I always hear...well, X doesn't test before eating, and X doesn't always bolus, etc, etc, etc. And I say - well do you really want an A1C of 11? X is not your D role model - you need to be hers.

    I had actually not read that blog post before. I can almost understand that need for freedom...almost because it is not me pricking my finger all the time.
     
  9. Mody_Jess_Pony

    Mody_Jess_Pony Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2008
    Messages:
    1,525
    It sorta bothers me, from a teen perspective, and I think for the company to it looks bad, if you can't even keep your own kids D under control then really and truly....
    At 13 you should be able to do basic care,
    At 13 most kids aren't that responsible
    At 13 your parents should still be active in your care, not down your throat, but if at 13 I pulled the crap these kids pulled, I WOULD be in so much trouble, I would have no life from that point on in till I smartened up, but hey I grew up in a different generation....
    but Seriously LEAVING a set in for a week, where the heck are the parents!
     
  10. s0ccerfreak

    s0ccerfreak Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2007
    Messages:
    2,111
    I think the video should have been targeted more at parents not so much at the teens. They message seemed to be you should be controlling this yourself, you know what you should be doing but you aren't doing it, and the girls did not seem like they were completely buying into it yet. The parents need to know what to be doing to help their teens, what can they be checking, and looking for. The mom asked "what did they do so we got that information" and the child said "oh they downloaded my pump." That is something that can easily be done at home to check on testing, bolusing, and site changes. No, you cannot determine everything by just downloading the pump; you need to talk to them too.

    My parents were involved in my care. I can tell you that my parents were not ones to check meters or my pump regularly. They were extremely trusting of me and if I said I bolused or tested they believed me. I did site changes in front of them usually so they knew I was doing those. Occassionally or before an appointment my mom would look at my log book, but I'll be honest I fudged some numbers when I was younger like ages 13-14. My thinking at that age- I'll make it look good on paper the way its suppose to look, not worrying about what the A1C would have to say. The endo caught on to the A1C and numbers not matching up when there was a drastic difference one time. We had a great chat, made a plan, and my attitude and behaviors quickly did a 180. My parents did check in with me more frequently for a little while but not long. I know at the time I was probably hating my parents for checking my meters and pump, but I wish they would have done that more often. Trust is important and something to be earned, but the level of trust to give must be a difficult thing to determine. You cannot just believe everything or question everything. I cannot even imagine how you deal with this. Making your child know that you trust them and love but that is why you are checking in on them.
     
  11. C6H12O6

    C6H12O6 Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2008
    Messages:
    1,451
    won?t have to get another painful needle in her side ?

    :confused:What does she mean when she says that when she goes back to the dr. if her blood sugars are all in line she won?t have to get another painful needle in her side ?

    It’s about at 3:43
     
  12. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    I thought that was a bit odd, too. All I can imagine is that she doesn't want a cgm, but perhaps believes that she will be required to get one if she A1c didn't improve? Could that be?:confused:
     
  13. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    8,240
    I am really impressed that the mom was willing to share this video to raise awareness, rather than cower about what was happening to the teens. Many very good and attentive parents have believed their kids/teens were doing everything according to expectations (i.e. Parent "Did you change your site?" Teen "Yes mom, last night". Parent "What's your blood sugar?" Teen "138" Parent "Wow that's great, thanks, let's eat.") and only at appointments found out their kids were burning out, struggling etc. You may not think so now, but it can happen in any family. Also there are some endo teams that encourage parents to back off and let the teen own the diabetes. We all have to find ways to be supportive of our children, to help relieve some of the burden of the 24/7/365 and to develop trust, and stay involved. It's a challenge. We can learn from others.
     
  14. wilf

    wilf Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2007
    Messages:
    9,652
    I don't have a problem with the Mom sharing this - there's lots for us parents to think about and learn. And for sure burnout and teen rebellion can happen to any family at any time. It is what I think about the most, and it is what I work the hardest on these days.

    But I sure don't want to in any way normalize poor D management in her peer group in my daughter's eyes. Showing her this video would in my opinion do that.
     
  15. Lawana

    Lawana Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Messages:
    383
    I look at dd's meter every day, at least once. Is that not the norm? And changing sites: The supplies are kept in a kitchen cabinet. I absolutely know when dd is changing her site. (I get to clean up, too.)
     
  16. Lee

    Lee Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Messages:
    9,633
    It is a good norm to have! Not every parent does though.
     
  17. Lawana

    Lawana Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Messages:
    383
    Exactly. Dd doesn't even consider it a possibility to test only once a day. We discuss what poor management can do over time, but in a general way. Watching 2 healthy looking, cute girls give details about how poor their d management was will not, in any way, inspire dd to better d management herself, despite their assertions that they have a plan to do better. Talk is cheap. And she just might get the idea that it's not normal for a parent to be involved daily in d care.
     
  18. frizzyrazzy

    frizzyrazzy Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2006
    Messages:
    14,141
    if nothing else, it has spurred a lot of conversation on what you should and shouldn't be doing with teens. I think it's ok that many of us disagree with this.

    I almost think that it's really no different than parenting teens in every other regard. We make sure the kids know that we're PRESENT in their lives. But we live in a society where making kids grow up fast is highly applauded. It starts when they're toddlers and we brag that Susie potty trained early, and susie can tie her own shoes and she's only 3, and susie is responsible for getting her own self fully ready for school each morning and she's 5, and susie at age 10 is responsible for making dinner each night. We're in such a rush to give these kids responsibilities that are beyond what their brain is capable of handling. Their bodies and their mouths might say, at 13, that they're able to handle diabetes on their own, but most simply are not.
     
  19. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,626
    Yes, this is true for us as well, and he changes sites at the kitchen counter generally.

    My motto is "trust but verify".
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice