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Type Two "honeymoon"?

Discussion in 'Adults with Type 2' started by Cool_Cuz, Mar 26, 2008.

  1. Cool_Cuz

    Cool_Cuz Approved members

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    So, my mom was diagnosed with T2 several months back. Her doctor told her that once your A1c is above a certain number, you are a "full-fledged diabetic" (she was pre-d up until then).

    The first few weeks, she checked her bg daily. Every single time, she was in range--sometimes even on the lower side of normal (90's). Now, she checks every few weeks, sometimes only once a month. She's never been high.

    She's been taking Glucofauge (sp?) since she was pre-d, but other than that she hasn't been doing anything to control her bg (adjusted diet/exercise, etc.) yet she is ALWAYS in range.

    Can someone with T2 have "honeymooning" periods, like people with T1 sometimes do? How long can it last? Or is it just luck? Or could it be as simple as taking the medicine?
     
  2. CAGrandma

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    Type 2 is soooo different from Type 1. People with Type 2 vary enormously in how or even if the disease progresses. There are some people that are like your mom - can go for years with little or no change with minimal treatment. Type 2 can even be reversed - although they will not say it is 'cured', blood sugars can revert to normal and stay there with no meds at all if weight, diet and exercise are good. Of course, for some, it gets harder and harder to keep the numbers where they should be.
     
  3. deafmack

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    :eek: What there is not such thing as the a1c making a person a full-fledged diabetic. It is only used like it is with Type 1to check the average blood sugar over the past 3 months.

    Your mother could be having a full range of numbers but it will remain hidden because of the way she checks. There is no way to know for sure unless she checks a lot more often and I mean a lot. I have type 2 and check 6 times a day and my numbers are never the same. Yesterday I had a 212 pre-lunch.

    Glucophage limits the amount of glucose put out by your liver. It has wonderful side effects such as nausea and diarrhea and stomach cramps and it is not as simple as taking a pill.

    Type 2 does not have a honeymoon period like Type 1. Also about 20% of people with diagnosed with type 2 actually have MODY or LADA. And it is not as simple as taking medicine although some people like to think so. A lot of medicine has horrible side effects such as diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, weight gain, water retention just to name a few plus some of the meds can cause nasty low blood sugars. And Type 2 can go into DKA especially if they are insulin dependent. The sad fact is that most people with type 2 are led to believe it is as simple as taking a pill and are not really given proper training regarding what to do. They come away thinking that taking a pill and seeing their doctor is all they need to do.

    Type 2 is an autoimmune disorder like Type 1 but it is still a different disease. Type 2 is progressive and it varies in its progression from person to person. Type 1 is much quicker to form and show itself while a person with type 2 can go undiagnosed for months or years and the damage is occuring during this time. I think both diseases stink but when they happen in children I think it is even worse. No child should have to live with Diabetes. Also they are now diagnosing Type 2 in children and the long term complications set in even faster tnan with type 1. Why I do not know .

    Both type 1 and type 2 are also genetic but the genetic factor seems to be stronger in Type 2 than in Type 1. Each person with type 2 is different and what works for one person will not work for another. The gamut ranges from diet and exercise only to totally insulin dependent. While weight can be a trigger for Type 2 it is not a cause but one of the symptoms of type 2. There are other things that can trigger type 2 as well but the person has to have the genetic predisposition for it in the first place. About 40% of people with type 2 are insulin dependent.
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2008
  4. Cool_Cuz

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    Thanks for the information. I really appreciate it. =]

    I know that Type 1 and Type 2 are completely different diseases...I'm sorry if it seemed like I was trying to suggest otherwise. I just know that I've seen some (very few, very minor) similarities, and was unsure if this was one of them.

    Taking Glucophage definitely is NOT easy. My mom is sick constantly, and is unable to work. She also has Chronic Fatigue Syndrom, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrom, and Fibromyalga. But she maintained a job through the exhaustion and pain anyway...but when she was put on Glucophauge, she got to a point where she was vomiting nearly daily and was feeling sick at random times. That's what really kept her at home.

    What her doctor told her was to check her bg constantly for the first few weeks, which she did--and that if her numbers were always in range, to only check every so often. But I don't know how reliable this doctor is...when he diagnosed her with T2D, he didn't explain anything or give her any kind of training. She wasn't told about how often to check until she went to a class a full week later. =/

    Anyway...thanks again for all the info, I really want to learn all I can about both T1 and T2.
     
  5. funnygrl

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    Honestly, it sounds to me like your mom is just doing a good job controlling it. Did she change her diet or add more exercise? What was her a1c? Her doctor was wrong on a1c being diagnostic. It's not. A fasting bg of 100-125 is pre-d, a fasting bg of 126+ is diabetes.
     

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