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Tube Pumps

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Leah, Nov 3, 2013.

  1. Ali

    Ali Approved members

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    You bolus for extended water time and just disconnect the pump. I like steel sets because for me they are easy, just poke in anywhere on your body like a thumb tack. I use the shortest needle and the sure ts which do not need an inserter device. I like that they never kink. You can put a piece of opsite or paper tape to keep stuck depending on the area you are using. There are a couple of steel sets out there with slightly different connectors and some use inserters some like Sure T you just poke in. :cwds:ali
     
  2. mamattorney

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    I think what you do about the basal depends upon why she's disconnecting. If she's disconnecting because she's going to be doing something active, you may just leave things alone and not account for that basal at all. Of she were disconnecting to get a massage or something then she probably would want to account for some or all of it up front.

    ** I have no experience with D and massages and how they affect BG's. It was just the first thing I thought of where you might be off the pump for an hour without exercising.
     
  3. Leah

    Leah Approved members

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    Thank you!!!

    Thanks so much everyone! This was all very helpful and I will definitely take all your suggestions under consideration!!! :)
     
  4. moco89

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    I have never used steel sets, ever, so my input is limited and biased. If you have an allergy to teflon or certain plastics, then a steel set is obviously preferred. Another thing is that you do not have to worry about the cannula "kinking" with a steel set. Many people on this forum have resorted to steel sets when they have encountered significant issues initially when starting the pump.

    I have noticed on CWD that younger CWD have more of a tendency to use steel sets. I do not know why, but maybe the parents want more guaranteed insulin delivery when the child cannot troubleshoot the issue?

    I think that over the years the design of the infusion sets have become more refined, so that problems occur less with the teflon cannulas. I was told years ago (2003) by a CDE pump trainer that 90 degree (or similar) insertion angle infusion sets have the highest risk of kinks. Using an insertion device (not hand-inserting the pump site) reduces this risk. Obviously with infusion sets like the Mio, Inset, and Inset 30 require you to use their integrated, disposable insertion device so that is certainly advantageous.
     
  5. moco89

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    If you end up going the Medtronic route and decide to get a mySentry, I asked some questions on this thread here:

    * http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showthread.php?t=74714

    Here are some Pros/Cons/Wish List

    * http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showpost.php?p=785366&postcount=36

    One of the problems is that you cannot completely turn off the screen on the mySentry. People are recommending window tinting film, but I do not recommend using this, as using window tinting film requires you to peel of the backing (cover) attached to the film, and adhering the film to the plastic screen. This could cause damage to the screen, and if Medtronic found out that you adhered window tinting film to the screen, this could void the warranty.

    Instead, I recommend linear polarizing film, to block the light from the screen on the mySentry. This sheet is the perfect size and is adequate to cover the entire "face" (front/front view) of the mySentry. You can verify the size on page 47 of the mySentry user guide. You can even add a second sheet, instead of putting the sheet width-wise, like you did with the first sheet, you apply the sheet lengthwise, which will block out all light, as this is linear polarizing film. You attach the film by using scotch tape or velcro or whatever you find suitable.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2013
  6. willie's mom

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    Just switched to T-Slim yesterday and even the first reservoir fill only took a coupple of minutes more. I was expecting much worse. It was not a problem at all. Can't say too much more yet since we just started, but we have loved it when "playing" with it.
     
  7. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

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    As far as steel sets, for my active teen they are just more reliable, you worry less about delivery. He works out a lot, plays sports, etc, and while we never really saw occlusions there were times I think things weren't fully delivered. With steel we've seen less problems with strange highs. He uses Contact Detach. We keep Comforts on hand as well for when he wants to avoid steel.

    Disconnection depends on the why of it. If for sports he just disconnects. Generally he'll choose to disconnect and then correct after whatever he's doing. If he knows he'll be away for a while (like at the beach) he does give about an hour basal before hand.
     

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