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True or False...Age at Dx effects variability?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by chocoholicsc, Oct 14, 2013.

  1. chocoholicsc

    chocoholicsc Approved members

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    Has anyone ever told you that the younger the child is when they are diagnosed, the harder it will be to manage their D..? I have heard this several times and wonder if there's any truth to it? We use our CGM pretty faithfully and even with that, we still have a hard time keeping him somewhat in range.
    Is there hope that as he grows older, things will level out a bit more?
     
  2. Christopher

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    I think that diabetes is so individualistic and there are so many variables that go into it, there is no way anyone can seriously make that claim. But I am sure they will. :eek:
     
  3. pianoplayer4

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    there are a lot of variables that can affect a persons diabetes.

    That being said I think there is definitely a difference in attitude between younger dx and older dx. When I'm at a conference or something for d I can usually guess whether a person was dx under or over the age of about ten by just talking to them. People who are dx a little later (in my experience) tend to take diabetes more seriously... maybe because they remember how bad they felt at dx. And people dx under 10 tend to pretend it isn't a big deal, and let their parents just worry about it.

    Of course this isn't everybody! it is just a pattern I've noticed=/
     
  4. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    People diagnosed younger within childhood have better diabetes control as adults than those diagnosed older within the childhood range, at least in sibling studies where two siblings are diagnosed.

    While they are kids, very small kids are harder to manage for a lot of reasons including size, lack of hypoglycemia awareness and communication, the trend for people diagnosed younger to have shorter honeymoon periods and more rapid and complete onsets.

    A1cs in type 1 diabetics are highest in the preschool and the teenage groups- adults have lower A1cs and the average A1c in adult type 1s continues to drop with age in a lot of the studies I've seen (that is, 35 year old t1s average lower A1cs than 25 year old t1s).

    I've definitely noticed my blood sugar being on average more stable now (age 24) than it was just a few years ago (say, age 21).
     
  5. Christopher

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    But why is that? Is it because they have been managing it for a longer period of time? Did the studies determine a root cause for that better control as adults?


    The higher A1c would make sense due to puberty, increased independence in adolescents, etc. And the lower A1c in adulthood would make sense with being more responsible, less biological changes in the body, etc.


    I guess I interpreted the OP to be asking if diabetes is harder to manage throughout a person's life, if they are dx at an early age. Meaning, DUE TO the fact they are dx at a young age, it intrinsically makes diabetes harder to manage the rest of their life. I don't see how anyone can make that claim and if they do I would like to see the studies to back it up.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2013
  6. chocoholicsc

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    This makes a lot of sense to me as well.:)
     
  7. chocoholicsc

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    This is very sad if it's true...really hoping to be an exception to this.
     
  8. chocoholicsc

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    This is very good news!! Because at this point I'm pulling my hair out!! :rolleyes:
     
  9. SarahKelly

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    Not a fact...but just stories from several other parents...from what I have been told things get to be a little more smooth around the age of 7. From their experiences it seemed that there was a lot of BG fluctuation due to the sensitivity of their young child to both insulin and carbohydrates AND a ton of growth occurring, too. Additionally, these parents didn't utilize the CGM technology because as it is now wasn't available to them 7 yrs ago. So...hopefully with the use of CGM technology and the insulin pump we are able to better fine tune things to keep BG's from fluctuating so much.
    But we still can't factor in those moments when our two year old suddenly spills the rest of his milk, or figure out how much of his food he smeared on his face/seat/floor/wherever else, nor is simple to always get a two year old to sit calmly for 15 minutes while you hope their BG gets above 75. I sure hope that these things become less of an issue as they get older :)
    I know that my husband, whom was diagnosed as a preteen, doesn't ever remember having such huge BG fluctuations as we've had with Isaac, but he does know that he had a heck of a time during the puberty years...so, to him this is a moot point as it's not easy for any age, just different.
     
  10. mmgirls

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    My dd was dx at 13 months, and will be 9 next month. She has cgmed for the over 4 years and we have always had allot of bg variability.

    Her a1c has been between high 6 and mid 8 since cgming mostly below 8 though.

    But allot of bg varability. I expdct it to get worse before it getts better as we approach puberty.
     
  11. manda81

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    I'd say false... just because everyone is so different.

    We were dx at 2, and I don't like to use the word control because we definitely aren't in control of anything *lol* I will say that we have a lot of success with our goals related to D, and very, very few issues.
     
  12. missmakaliasmomma

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    It really depends on what aspect of D they're talking about. On one hand, the younger the child is when diagnosed, the easier it is to make better food choices, they get used to getting shots and being tested often and it becomes their way of life. My daughter doesn't remember life without D because she was diagnosed at 17 months. Because she doesn't remember not having D, she has never once said, Why me? I think she believes her diabetes makes her different, and therefore, special.

    Being young though usually comes with an increased insulin sensitivity and I think that's mostly to do with the fact that they don't weigh alot so even a half unit can make a huge difference in BGs. Whereas, if an adult took 1/2 unit too much, it'd probably end up to barely make a difference.

    I've known people diagnosed at older ages (in their teens) who don't want to be bothered with their new lifestyle, and they don't dose right, test enough, eat crap and drink alcohol, etc. I personally don't blame them, it would be very hard for me if I developed D now, after seeing what my daughter goes through, having to change my eating habits, actually eating 3 meals a day, etc.

    Every nurse and dr I've come in contact with, including when she was first dxd, have said that it's much better that she was diagnosed at such a young age, because she will know no difference.

    I do think if she was diagnosed at say 5, she'd be able to differentiate against highs and lows, but at 17 months old, she didn't know what felt "normal" so she still doesn't really know.
     
  13. missmakaliasmomma

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    It's not true. My daughter wants to handle her diabetes on her own, but she obviously can't. She helps me now by testing her BG and telling me the numbers. The other day she asked me how many units of humalog she was getting. She definitely is on the right track to being independent with it. You have to remember, not all kids are the same. Some are just lazy with or without D. Some are independent with or without D.

    Try to involve your child as much as you can.
     
  14. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I recall being told when DD was dxd a decade ago that it used to be considered "worse" if a kid was dx'd young. As I recall it had more to do with what tools were available at the time to managing a young kid and wasn't related to a child's capacity to manage their care or anything inherently bad or worse about an early dx.

    In other words, it's sort of an old wives tale and not really relevant to us.
     

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