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Trick or treat

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by njswede, Oct 31, 2015.

  1. njswede

    njswede Approved members

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    We're going trick or treating this afternoon. I have a feeling it's going to be painful...

    How do you guys handle that? He's going to score a ton of candy that I can't let him eat (except for a couple of pieces). To make matters worse, he's got a non-D twin sister...
     
  2. rgcainmd

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    I'm sure not everyone is going to agree with me, but here goes: I let my daughter eat as much candy as she wants on Halloween, just like I did before her diagnosis. The only difference: we pre-bolus with the amount of insulin required. If she goes "too" high afterwards, we treat the number and move on!
     
  3. Cheetah-cub

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    It doesn't have to be painful. Let your son enjoy Halloween as any non-D kids, and eat as much candy as you would normally allow, and just bolus for them.

    We allow our 12 year-old eat her Halloween treats as her non-D sister, as long as the treats are gluten free.
     
  4. mamattorney

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    My daughter inevitably goes low when trick or treating - must be the combo of the walking/running and the excitement. So she eats candy periodically while she trick or teats in addition to what she eats later. Not at all deprived!
     
  5. dayanne

    dayanne New Member

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    I will either buy his bag of candy or have him trade it I for a toy or something like that. Some of his friends do this even though they are not diabetic. This seems to work for him and us. Halloween is tough, he was diagnosed around Halloween 2013. Maybe this may work for his sibling too. ��
     
  6. njswede

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    That's probably what I would have ended up doing anyway. Thanks for your comments! Now I don't have to feel like the worst parent in the world for letting him have candy and probably spike! :)
     
  7. Nancy in VA

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    My kids don't scarf it down on Halloween, mainly from several years of belly aches that have taught them better. Its usually 3-4 pieces on Halloween night, and that's likely what Emma will do this year - if she stops running long enough to eat, that is. She does tend to go low when she's out so hubby will probably grab a couple packs of smarties to tuck in his pocket just in case.
     
  8. Theo's dad Joe

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    My kids will go trick or treating and put all of their candy in a bag in their room, or if they want, I will keep it on a shelf. They can then pick one or two a day to work into their lunch and dinner which is pretty much the same as the rest of the year regarding treats. Then they also get the fun of having a bag of candy and choosing and planning what to put in their lunch.
     
  9. jenm999

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    This will only be our second Halloween, but this is exactly what happened last year! Our plan is to swag it on the actual night and then have 1-2 pieces/day going forward with bonus. I have a great cheat sheet link somewhere of carb counts for all the fun-size candy which is not often labeled.

    Here it is: http://jdrf.org/neny/wp-content/uploads/sites/36/2013/09/candy-carb-counts.pdf
     
  10. Megnyc

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    I always just ate the candy and bolused as needed. I have allergies so my parents would buy candy I could have and trade me for the candy I got trick or treating that wasn't "safe." I'm pretty sure I enjoyed trading the candy (and arguing about how many starbursts a full size candy bar was worth) with my brothers more than actually eating it though.

    Have fun! I'm excited to get trick or treaters tonight!
     
  11. StacyMM

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    Mine have always dropepd while trick or treating, which is great because they have all that candy on them and love being able to eat as the go. After they got back, I'd have them bolus for a huge amounts of carbs and let them eat. They would save the wrappers so when they were done, I could add it up and then bolus for the extra or set a temp basal if they ate less.

    And even better than Trick or Treating is the day after, which I think of as "go buy lots of clearance junk to use for lows" day. And don't just look in the candy aisle - even granola bars and breakfast bars and the like have Halloween themes! My kids use this stuff at school until Valentine's which is my secondary "go buy lots of clearance junk to use for lows" day.
     
  12. Lakeman

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    Before diagnoses we always limited the amount of candy our kids would eat on Halloween. All the rest went into a "candy box" which each child had access to everyday in moderation until it was gone. It was not uncommon for candy from last year to be thrown away because it had gotten too old.

    After diagnoses my kids actually eat more candy than before to treat lows. The fast candy gets thrown into a "low box".

    On Halloween day my daughter tends to go low from all the walking and fast candy is certainly available. Chocolate boluses really well so it is not hard to eat some chocolate, while not low, and just dose for it.
     
  13. valerie k

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    I get more excited to hit the candy isle after the holidays just for this reason.... at Easter, Halloween and Christmas...
     
  14. njswede

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    Well it worked out beautifully. I intentionally over-bolused slightly for dinner and he started to feel a little low when the basket was filling up, so I told him to pop a few pieces of candy to get his BG up again. Of course we overshot, but that's easy to fix when you have a pump and Dexcom. Just bolus on the up-slope. After that, he got tired of eating candy and we just stashed it. Thanks everyone!
     
  15. Snowflake

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    We bolused for about 5 pieces, and kept both kids that limit, which is probably the max our non-d 3 yr old could do without getting sick. Then 15 minutes after dd fell asleep, she beeped 58 and we gave her a juice. It made me feel bad I didn't give her those last bag of skittles she'd begged - that would have been a much better way to conclude Halloween night! All in all, though, a big improvement over the bg roller coaster last year.
     
  16. jenm999

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    Well we totally failed! He started at 126 and just kept climbing from all the excitement! I let him have 2 pieces with a bolus and he still got home at HI. Then overcorrected and he went LO. Poor guy. His BG is very sensitive to emotion. Fortunately he's not a candy junky and happy to have 1 piece/day with dessert until it's gone.
     
  17. rgcainmd

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    You didn't "fail"; you're not allowed to say that!

    Your son just had a rough ride while surfing the Halloween sugar waves!
     
  18. kim5798

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    We went to a party & I have no idea what Danielle's blood sugars were. I asked at one point if she had tested & was told that she had bloused for everything she ate. At about 10pm, once home, she told me she was 97....woke up fine this am...happy to let go of some of the responsibilities of diabetes as she grows up:)
     
  19. jenm999

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    Tongue in cheek! All's well that ends well. :)
     

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