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Transplant May Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by BrokenPancreas, Oct 24, 2009.

  1. BrokenPancreas

    BrokenPancreas Banned

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  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Did I miss any mention of the use of anti-rejection meds with this procedure?
     
  3. BrokenPancreas

    BrokenPancreas Banned

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    It does mention that in the article.
     
  4. teacherone

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    It sounds great but it needs more development. Hopefully they find a way to keep the pancreas from rejecting the new cells. Otherwise you're replacing one drug with another.

    http://www.ucsfhealth.org/adult/special/i/70759.html

    I will definitely keep an eye on this. Seems very promising!
     
  5. sam1nat2

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    I'll take insulin any day over antirejection drugs!!! Its nice, but really, what stops the body from attacking the new beta cells? so you take anti rejection drugs to keep the new pancreas (which has many other functions besides insulin production) and then eventually the antibodies attack it so you have to take insulin and anti rejection drugs??
    Maybe I'm missing something, obviously I'm not a medical person and can't possibly have their knowledge, but I'm not sold.
    Optomistic that a cure will be found though:cwds:
     
  6. Darryl

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    Nothing new here... there have been many demonstrations of islet transplants resulting in insulin production
    for up to 2 years, at the cost of taking immunosuppressive drugs for the rest of one's life.

    From: http://biomed.brown.edu/Courses/BI108/BI108_2004_Groups/Group04/Side_Effects.htm
    Side effects of immunosuppressive therapy include:

    alopecia - loss of hair, baldness
    anemia - a pathological deficiency in the oxygen carrying compound of the blood
    arthralgias - pain experienced in the joints
    bone marrow depletion - a depletion of bone marrow (a soft, fatty, vascular tissue that fills most bone cavities - it is the source of blood cells)
    coronary artery disease - a stage of arteriosclerosis involving fatty deposits inside the artery walls that feed the heart
    cushingoid appearance - moon face, buffalo hump, centripetal obesity
    gastrointestinal upsets - discomfort spurring from the stomach and/or intestines
    gingival hyperplasia - an increase in the amount of gum tissue in the mouth
    glaucoma - eye diseases characterized by high intraocular fluid pressure, damaged optic disk, hardening of the eyeball, and loss of vision
    hepatoxicity - damage to the liver
    hirsutism - excess facial and body hair
    hypercholesterolemia - the presence of excess cholesterol in blood
    hyperglycemia - the presence of excess sugar in the blood
    hyperkalemia - a condition where potassium levels are too high in the body
    hyperlipidemia - the presence of excess fat or lipids in the blood
    hypertension - abnormally high blood pressure - especially arterial blood pressure
    hypertricosis - excessive hair growth
    hypertriglyceridemia - a disorder due to disturbances in synthesis and/or degradation of triglycerides-rich plasma lipoprotiens
    hyperuricemia - the presence of excess uric acid in the blood
    hypomagnesemia - a deficiency of magnesium in the blood
    leucopenia - a decrease in the total number of white blood cells in circulating blood
    malignancy - presence of a tumor (cancer)
    nausea - extreme disgust with an urge to vomit
    nephrotoxicity - damage or poisoning to the kidneys
    neoplasia - the formation of tumors
    opportunistic infection - any infection caused by a microorganism that does not normally cause disease in humans
    osteoporosis - a condition characterized by decrease in bone mass and bone density
    pancreatitis - inflammation of the pancreas
    pruritis - a sensation of itchiness on the skin
    thrombocytopenia - decrease in the number of blood platelets that is often associated with hemorrhage conditions
    tremor - trembling or shaking, usually from physical weakness and disease
    ulcer formation - development of a break in the skin or mucous membrane with loss of surface tissue
     
  7. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I see - it's in the link within the link.;) Thanks.
     
  8. buggle

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    Anti-rejection drugs are nasty. They require constant and intensive testing and opens the person up to all sorts of issues, since their own immune system is weakened -- not just flus, but things like cancer.

    I think that transplants (islet and pancreas) are far worse than just living with diabetes. It's also something that is incredibly expensive that wouldn't be available to everyone -- very few pancreases and islet cells are available.
     
  9. FeeferGross

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    or you could be like me, who has had both an organ transplant and type 1 diabetes :p nah, i would rather insulin shots... even though im already on anti-rejection meds.. so hey, maybe it would work? :p
     
  10. buggle

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    I didn't know you'd had an organ transplant, Chris. So, you don't find that the anti-rejection drugs help with the D at all?

    Do you know if the anti-rejection regime you're on would be similar to the one they use for islet transplant? It would be worth perusing if that's the case.

    ETA: This is a blog by a woman who's undergone an islet transplant. She goes into detail about her drug regime.
     
  11. maha

    maha Approved members

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    Well said, 15 years ago they started to reveal some good result about greffes and after transplant and with the promise that'll be find less aggressive drug... But 15 years after the antirejection drug are unfortunatly the same.
     

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