advertisement

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Transitions in Care: Meeting the Challenges of Type 1 Diabetes in Young Adults

Discussion in 'Parents of College Kids and Young Adults with Type' started by Ellen, Feb 4, 2012.

  1. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    8,240
  2. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    5,560
    Wow, you wrote a great review of the book on Amazon.com. I'll bet they were glad you did that.
     
  3. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    8,240
    I was so impressed with it. After I read it I wrote the review and then sent it to each of the authors. I didn't know them before. I've since met two of them. Jill Weissberg-Benchell Ph.D. is on faculty at CWD FFL - she's fabulous.
     
  4. My2Prayers

    My2Prayers New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2013
    Messages:
    1
    Thank you for the recommendationE

    Ellen,
    Just want to say a BIG thanks for recommending this book. I have had some challenges as a parent of a 19 year old T-1. She is my world and I want to learn as much as I can to transform my parenting as needed throughout the journey of youth to adulthood..
    Best to you..
    Linda
     
  5. Corinne Masur

    Corinne Masur Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2008
    Messages:
    435
    College bound

    I might as well write the first post of 2017. I have not been on CWD for 4 or 5 years but now my son has been accepted to college. What an exciting AND frightening event! For the first time ever I am now putting him in charge of night time BG checks and remediation BUT he is not taking on this responsibility. He does not always wake up the alarm he sets; he does not always set his alarm; he is angry with me if I say anything about any of this. For the moment I am his back up and I continue to get up several times a night to check on whether or not he has done what he needs to do. IDEAS?????????
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2017
  6. Ali

    Ali Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,204
    I might start by talking with his Endo on your own. It maybe that you need to let his Dr. have this conversation with him and I am hoping the Dr. or a therapist has some strategies for you. So sorry. ali
     
  7. Mimikins

    Mimikins Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2014
    Messages:
    203
    A small disclaimer -I am a college student, diagnosed as an adult (about 3 years ago at 18), and my parents have never been intimately involved in my diabetes management (they pretty much only know how to give glucagon and the main signs of DKA). I'm also guilty of only doing overnight checks if I'm purposefully basal testing or feel high/low.

    Is he on a CGM and/or pump? Could you bargain that if he goes through the steps needed to have an accurate basal rate (basal testing) or uses a CGM during the night, then he doesn't need to set an alarm every night to test his BG? If he has a hard time waking up from alarms, is a vibrating alarm (such as using a fitbit bracelet) a possibility (what I like with the fitbit is that I only have to set my alarm once, and it can repeat if I want to)?
     
  8. mwebb

    mwebb Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2015
    Messages:
    6
    Hi there, I am the mother of a 21yo who really balked through most of high school in self managing her diabetes. Finally I had to back off and lower my standards a bit. (I'm not saying you are like me I'm just telling you what seemed to work) She really needed to own it. I did tell her though that the agreement for her to go to school would be an A1C goal that was reasonable for her. I never required her to wake up and test, only that she manage her A1C and that I just affirm whatever steps I could in her managing the diabetes on her own. I also made her go to her own appointments - I stopped going completely. Even though her A1C was on the higher side - 8.5-9, she was managing and I was not. When she went to college, she made sure to get an endo there of her own initiative(she was 6 hours away). I thought that was great progress. She saw other students on pumps and decided to go back on the pump (yay!). She figured out when and how often to order her own supplies. Her A1C continued its decent into a better range. All in all, I know she still has a ways to go, but this is going to be her thing to do for the rest of her life (God forbid), so I knew that she just had to figure it out.

    At any rate, I just want to encourage you that your son is going to be OK. He WILL get it. But it may take you lowering your standards a bit to step back and let him figure this out on his own.
    One thing I would say about college - whatever you do, make SURE he gets an appt right away to get in and talk to the appropriate folks so that if he needs to miss class or miss a test due to highs or lows that he's covered with all his profs. That was a big deal at her school, and she got a zero on a test once because we didn't do it right away and she missed a quiz due to a low BG. Live and learn!!
    Good luck and God bless!:smile:
     

Share This Page

advertisement