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Thinking of switching from Contact Detach

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by joy orz, Jun 26, 2011.

  1. joy orz

    joy orz Approved members

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    Ava has been on the pump now for over three years. We've always used contact detach steel sets.

    The last few months and weeks though, her sets have not been healing up the way they used to. I don't know if it's that she would be getting scar tissue anyway, or if she is beginning to react to the sets.

    She's still a skinny minny, so we only use her toosh and arms. I'm thinking of making the switch to a different set to see if we can rotate sites abit more.

    Though I love the comfort of knowing the site isn't kinked. I'm dreading going to a teflon set and always worring about a blocked site. Anyone have to make the switch?

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Lovemyboys

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    We just recently switched from contact detach to comfort shorts. We kept getting blood in the tubing from the c-d sets. The comfort shorts work well for us, but the sites take longer to heal.
     
  3. Lisa P.

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    We recently were forced to change to angled sets. They work for us now, when only steel sets seemed to work before. Have not had problems, but we try to change every other day. The steel sets seemed to begin to pump into her muscle or something as she grew up and got leaner, we were getting horrible numbers, much better now. :)

    Sometimes I think how kids heal or scar has more to do with how their immune system is developing than anything external. Sometimes Selah's good immune system seems to cause problems for our Dexcom, for example, since her body has an immune reaction to the wire and can surround it with white cells (?) that mess up readings?
     
  4. joy orz

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    Sara, any thoughts on why they take longer to heal? Ava's set's are taking longer than they ever did and she is itching at them. I think she may be developing an allergy or something. We did the steel sets because she has sensitive skin and i was worried she'd be allergic to the teflon. And I love the ease of putting the set on.

    Lisa, are you still using metal sets that are angled, or are they teflon? What are you guys using? What do you think accounts for the better numbers?
     
  5. Lisa P.

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    Are there angled steel sets? I've never known that there were, so we just used the inset 30s or whatever they are called that normally come with the Ping. Sorry, I get all the labels very confused. But they are Teflon, and we haven't had the problems we used to have. I'm not sure why, they aren't pulling out or getting blood in them as much.

    I think when we moved to steel sets it was in part because we wanted to be able to troubleshoot without switching out sites over and over in case that was the problem. With the steel sets you can take that possibility out of the mix. But I don't think we necessarily were having a lot of site failures, we mostly had basal issues but couldn't decipher them while wondering about site failures.

    We recently switched to the angled sets because we had about four months of huge, huge problems with her numbers going straight up and down all day and night every day and night. Nothing made sense. Bolus and basal unpredictable. Changes didn't have consistent results. Dexcom often very wrong or going to ????. Brenda here let me know they'd had something similar happen and needed angled sets. I still don't know if maybe she was just developing absorption problems so now that we're at a new "level" it's better. But I'm pretty convinced that as she grew and got rid of baby fat and stretched out (you know, looking more like cat than kitten?) that those sets were beginning to deliver insulin into muscle. I used to think insulin in muscle just meant a faster reaction, but I read from someone (LantusFiend?) that injecting insulin into muscle actually makes for erratic absorption. So I think we were getting insulin either not getting in at all or getting in far too quickly or not getting in as small basal deliveries but then a bunch of basal getting in with the next bolus and whammo!

    We moved to angled sets and a shot of Lantus a day, and our world makes sense again. We still have our days, of course, but we had been correcting in one direction or another every hour all day and night. It was unworkable.

    Anyway, probably has little to do with your situation but since our kids are on a similar track and this made a huge improvement for us, thought I'd detail it.

    I'll ask, is she swimming a lot or has she changed soap or bubble bath or anything? I think with Selah sometimes the site can get irritated by things other than the pump set itself. For example, we went swimming at a pool that I think was way heavily chlorinated and it just made a bit of a mess of the site. All of us had skin issues, itchy or dry and rashy, so it helped me see it wasn't the adhesive or anything, it was that the skin that was always irritated and broken under the set then got exposed to something further irritating so didn't heal as well.

    Good luck figuring it all out.
     
  6. Lovemyboys

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    I'm not sure why they take longer to heal. The steel set only left a little mark that was gone in a couple of days. These "pump bumps" will stay for a lot longer and you can see multiple ones on his bum where past sets have been inserted. I don't know if it's an allergy or not, good question. I think I'll have the endo take a close look at them during his upcoming appointment to make sure.
     
  7. Lisa P.

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    I've been told insulin is a growth hormone, I'm thinking that where ever you put a site there's going to be a "bump" of growth (temporary, I'm guessing, as cells swap out over time) and that if the cannula is delivering closer to the surface we're more likely to see it/feel it?

    Just a thought.

    (forgive my interchanging "set" and "site", can't seem to use the words properly!)
     
  8. aidensmom

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    DS has only been pumping since September, but we have switched in that time from contact detach to the insets. My son was complaining about pain during insulin delivery (to the point of not wanting to eat carbs) with the contact detach. He was also afraid to try something new, but we finally convinced him to try the inset and it has made a huge difference! He still occasionally complains that he can feel the insulin going in, but it has been much better overall. DH and I also loved not having to worry about the kinked cannula, but have had very few problems with the insets. I'd be glad to send you a few if you want to give them a try. Site changes for us have gotten much less stressful and I do think that the site may heal better/quicker with the insets. We were only using belly, but have branched out recently to bottom and he seems to be healing well for the most part. I'd say it's worth trying out some different infusion sets just to see how it works for you. :cwds:
     
  9. hawkeyegirl

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    We switched from a steel set to an angled cannula set (the equivalent of Animas' Comfort Short). The steel sets simply stopped working for us. We find the angled sets very reliable, and do not have any more issues with them than we did with the steel sets before they stopped working.
     
  10. emm142

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    Personally, I get quite a lot of kinks with angled teflon sets (fewer than with straight-in teflon sets, but still a significant amount). However, I wouldn't hesitate to give them another go if I was having serious problems with sure-Ts.

    In my experience they leave slightly larger scars, but seem marginally better than 90 degree sets in terms of absorption (when they are working). They're more intimidating to insert (longer needle) but definitely didn't hurt me any more once they were in.
     

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