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thinking of developing a Type 1 D short course for my teen

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by wilf, May 7, 2011.

  1. wilf

    wilf Approved members

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    Picking up where I left off in a previous thread - I've been thinking of preparing a diabetes short course for my DD, and PAYING her to take it at a rate which would be competetive with a part-time job.

    The local clinic provides no training to teens, and the expectation is that parents will do it. But how do you persuade a teen to take precious hours out of their evenings and weekends to spend yet more time on diabetes? And what materials do you use, when there are none available that are geared towards teens?

    Then it came to me that there's nothing stopping me from getting off my duff and putting something together. Moreover, I've come to the conclusion that there's nothing wrong with a little pay-off for my daughter for time spent on good and important learning. She has enough hardship that comes with the D, why not something good for a change? :)

    It would probably be a series of math/science type work pages, designed to go with my favourite D reference texts (Type 1 Diabetes, by Hanas and Using Insulin, by John Walsh). I'm thinking of putting it together over the next year. It would be aimed at optimizing an MDI regimen, because that's what DD's doing. But I'm hoping that it shouldn't be too hard to put together an extra piece to handle the intricacies of pumping, as DD has expressed an interest in having her Type 1 friends do this with her and some of them are pumping.

    Anyhow, this is what I've been mulling over lately. I'd be interested to hear your thoughts. I'd also be very interested in hearing if any of you are aware of useful handouts or work sheets that might already be available. I've gone through the stuff we got from our local clinic, and rejected much of it. But there may be some good materials out there somewhere - if so, I'd appreciate any references you may have.. :cwds:
     
  2. Mrs Puff

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    Awesome! I was the Facepalm poster and I just posted on my thread about the same thing! Here is what I said:

    Here is the weird thing about my son, who just turned 13 before diagnosis. He can be anal retentive about some aspects of diabetes care (doc said to do this...when I am trying to make some adjustments on the fly) but then have no problem swiping occasional skittles during the day when he isn't low. It is like there is a disconnect somewhere in his brain He will bark at his sister about not asking permission if she can have some milk, while purloined skittles are dissolving in his mouth

    I think someone should come up with some kind of curriculum that teaches diabetes care in stages. Obviously they can't load you up with too much info when you leave the hospital or no one would leave. I would have kept sleeping on that horrid bench if it meant someone else would be preparing food and giving shots! However, we all get home and feel clueless. If something new to learn was given to me once a week, that would be so much easier. Maybe that is what I need to do with my son. Once a week session where we learn something interesting like what fat does to insulin or how exercise affects his numbers. Maybe someone who has been at this a while can create something? hint, hint

    I would like to throw on another thought. Ds has no problem giving shots, figuring up carbs, etc...What he needs trained on now is the "whys" of his disease. Why does exercise help you when you are high? Why should you not exercise if you have ketones? Why does fatty food mess with insulin? Why should you not snag the occasional skittle from the jar when you aren't low? I need to start training him to think about his care, cause and effect, etc...
     
  3. Tricia22

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    Wilf -
    I would suggest getting in touch with some of the diabetes camps out there. They almost always do some diabetes education stuff mixed in with the regular summer camp stuff - maybe they'd have some resources or ideas on where to get "teen-geared" diabetes stuff. :)
    I think that's a really cool idea, and you could do another little one when college draws closer geared at drinking and D, cafeteria college eating, late night study session tips, etc.
    I am currently unemployed (desperately searching for a full time benefits RN job) so if there's anything I could help you with for this project, I'd love to help out. I think it sounds like an awesome idea, and depending on how far you want to go with it, you could even add in some diabetes activities / science expriments.
     
  4. Lisa P.

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    My only suggestion is that there are print on demand presses (lulu) that can make formatting schmancy for you. I'd also suggest that you make it a co-op night for local diabetic teens and their parents (I wouldn't try to teach a class yourself for liability reasons, but I'd guess if it were more a support group sort of collective thing it would be all right?)

    Wait, I guess that's two suggestions.

    Sounds like a great idea.

    Oh, wait -- a third. She could put together her own booklet. You always learn things better when you have to work through them and organize and synthesize the information yourself. Can't see the reward in that, though, and I agree there should be one. How about she could put one together and submit it to agents and publishers to see if she can actually get it published and finance college with the royalties? :p:p
     
  5. MReinhardt

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    I've been working on a book format just for Chell. With all of Chell's medical, its easy to forget something.

    So in Chell's book, I customize for her what to do if she is low - what to take & how much at a time, and if she is high - what to do. I have ALL of her medical drs, names phone numbers, address all lined up, with the meds he/she prescribes and pharmacy numbers.

    I also have contact numbers to call in case of an emergency. I have a sheet on how to give mini shots of gluagon if case she can not get her blood sugars up, along with when to give the full amount of glucagon.

    I also have sheets in her book that has her pump settings, sensor settings, along with what to do if she has a pump failure and has to go back to MDI on how much lantus to take, how much for a bolus for food and how much insulin she needs to bring her blood sugars down via a syringe, along with a cheat cheat correction sheet, with instructions on how to figure it all out.

    There is also information about gastroparesis, her bowel issues and how to flusher her bowels and the regiment because she is on a 4 day cycle of meds, and what to do if she has problems. There is information what to do about nausea, if its related to gastroparesis, or if its related to high blood sugars, ketones.

    At the bottom of each page is some encouraging words for her to reflect upon, that she CAN do this and succeed in all it (one day :)).
     
  6. kidsmakes7

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    Wilf - Our son turns 18 in July. Any chance you can put that together quicker? We'll pay tuition! :D

    We'll have to name you a CWDC CTE or a CCTE for short. (CWD Community Certified Teen Educator)
     
  7. obtainedmist

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    Regarding the "going to college and beyond crowd" there is a full day class offered by the Barbara Davis Center each June. Here is the contact person should you be interested in having her forward any information. The emphasis of this class is to get the late teens thinking about how to care for themselves when the 'rents aren't around day to day. Contact her if you are interested, I'm sure she'd be happy to share hand outs if you aren't anywhere near Colorado!

    Reece, Regina
    E-mail Address(es):
    Regina.Reece@ucdenver.edu
     
  8. chbarnes

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    Overall, I think it is a great idea, particularly since you use a very sophisticated form of MDI that few endos or CDEs would use. I'm sure there are many parents here who would love to see your PowerPoint. That being said, the point that caught my attention was paying her to learn. With Chris we have used bribes and incentives for everything except diabetes. It works for some things, some of the time. But we have always said that diabetes management is too fundamental and too important for cash incentives. Meanwhile, he has a friend whose parents have told her they will buy her a car if she gets her A1c down (but who refuse to get a CGM because they don't want her to "use a crutch"). Right now, Chris is pretty disinterested in diabetes. He more often is bolusing for meals without entering his BG. So it is tempting to consider an incentive, but I'm afraid it could backfire.
     
  9. wilf

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    Well, we don't use cash incentives for D management. I agree that would be a slippery slope.

    But I'm asking her to take the equivalent of the short course we had in Germany when DD was diagnosed, plus additions for advanced MDI - that means 12-15 lectures of 60-90 minutes, plus homework of at least as long again after each. No, in this case she gets paid. I need to get the knowledge from my head to hers, and I need her to be happy to be there learning it. :)
     
  10. emm142

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    I think the incentive will probably work in this situation. Wilf won't be paying his daughter for doing D tasks (which I think is a problematic idea) but for doing "classes" on D topics. It just seems different to me. You don't want to give your kid the idea that they are only doing D tasks for a cash reward, because at some point the cash reward will disappear, but if it takes an incentive to get her interested in the facts behind her D management.. it just seems different to me.
     
  11. BrendaK

    BrendaK Neonatal Diabetes Registry

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  12. wilf

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    Wow! I had not seen this. I'm thinking I'll order this and see how these lectures look. I could save myself a lot of work if someone else has done this. Since nothing is offered locally I was assuming nothing was available.
     
  13. chbarnes

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    Gary Scheiner is excellent. You would probably still have to supplement with info on the use of different types of insulin, but beyond that he provides basic to advanced knowledge. He can also consult or teach on a one to one basis via phone or the Internet.
     
  14. BrendaK

    BrendaK Neonatal Diabetes Registry

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    I plan on taking the course on diabetes and exercise offered this week. I can't be there live, but will be ordering it.

    The pizza "sample" course is excellent!
     
  15. dejahthoris

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    The type1university thing costs money tho right? Its been awhile since I looked at it. I think it would be awesome to put together something like this for teens. Something that helped them to feel independent from their parents and take charge of their own care, something empowering. This is really something to think about.
     
  16. KatieJane'smom

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    The camps were my first thought, too. Camp Sweeney does medical education every day and they "pay" the kids for learning in two ways: they have a "medical question of the day" where the kids earn anything from extra tokens to spend to a game boy. The second pay-off comes at the end of the 3 week camp when the entire camp takes a test (based on their age levels) and the person with the highest score wins a Wii system or some other big prize comparable to that.

    My dd has learned a lot from these medical talks - much more than she learns at the endo.

    Looks like you've gotten some good leads. If you need any help I would be interested in helping. Not sure what I can do but I'm willing.
     
  17. Heather(CA)

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    I am absolutely not knocking your idea :) I guess I have just looked at Seth's learning about D as a process...A crash coarse couldn't hurt though..What are you planning on working on first?
     

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