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There are no absolutes

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Sarah Maddie's Mom, Feb 16, 2014.

  1. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    It's worth remembering that there are no absolutes in managing Type 1. Your meter isn't giving you a perfect reading, your cgm is calibrated off that meter, the carb counts on packaging isn't always correct, and the ripe banana that you've weighed so carefully may have more carbs than the less ripe one you'll weigh tomorrow using the same carb factor.

    It's worth just keeping that in mind lest you drive yourself crazy. We do the best we can with the tools we have - but the tools we have are not perfect.
     
  2. wilf

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    A sage and timely reminder. We were a bit crazy the first few years, until this sunk in.
     
  3. Mish

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    I found it was easier once I just went ahead and went full on crazy, when I stopped trying to fight it. Then the little issues didn't bother me so much anymore. ;)

    Joking aside, we're all coming from different family situations, with different parenting styles, and we're all raising different kids. But the one constant is we're all striving to fit diabetes into the lives we've already established. And while it's true that YDMV, we're all trying to find that balance that lets our children be both happy AND healthy. And we're all trying to do it with imperfect tools, with growing children. If only we had a printout; "today growth hormones will be peaking at 2am, adjust accordingly", but we do the best we can.
     
  4. sszyszkiewicz

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    I went to school to study meteorology, computer science, and business.......I never went to school to be a beta or alpha cell, and I am a poor approximation of one.

    ....and that scares the daylights out of me.

    So I am just trying to do the best I can, one meal at a time.
     
  5. swellman

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    I have a Master's in Chemistry and a second career in Software Development and Programming and I'm used to being in control, which means I'm usually out of my mind most of the time. I will master this ... I will master this. Who am I kidding? Thanks for the reminder. :victorious:
     
  6. Beach bum

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    And really, this is the reality of things. We just need to do the best we feel we can. Our best so that we don't go crazy, our best so we don't drive our kids crazy. Like all things in life, we aren't always our best, but tomorrow is a new day. We learn from our mistakes and move on.
     
  7. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    When I first appreciated the meter accuracy +/- 20% I was floored. Here I was believing that this bg of 167 was "true" and that exactly .5u would fix it in X # of minutes, or conversely that her low of 57 needed exactly y# of carbs and in so many minutes she's be 90... Oy, I roll my eyes at myself.

    Not only do we not really know what we think we "know", then there's all that metabolic, hormonal stuff that we can't even begin to quantify.

    I really feel for newly dx'd families and the certainty of the treatment plan that is dished out at the hospital.
     
  8. MomofSweetOne

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    And on those rare occasions we get an absolutely beautiful graph for a day - no hormone swings - no missed boluses - or forgetting to eat - or wonky BG readings - or....then the pump tubing malfunctions and pulls out in the night, once again reminding us to not shoot for two week's of "ideal" before the endo visit. (What happened to the eyeroll emoticon? That I even entertained the notion of walking in with such deserves one!!)
     
  9. shannong

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    I remember our diabetes team made it sound like everything would be so straightforward and simple. Just give this shot of NPH twice a day and your good to go! I'm still a little bitter about it. I would have done better emotionally in the beginning if someone had told me that there is no perfection in diabetes control. On the tough days, I try to remind myself that I am not a pancreas, I am only human, so I will just never do as good a job as a fully functioning pancreas. It's still hard for me not to get frustrated and down on myself when his bg's skyrocket or plummet. But I have started to realize that my son very much notices my reactions, so I am trying to roll with it more. I know one day he will take over all of his diabetes care, and I wouldn't want him getting down on himself.
     
  10. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    LOL, I know! I get that they were probably trying to keep us calm and ease us into the dx... it's just that no one ever took me aside 6 months later and said, "ok, you've had your baby steps so now it's time for dx lesson 2.0 and you'll be having one of these every year for a while because it isn't just giving them a shot in the morning and going on your way" Rather, I spent a bunch of years feeling like I was screwing up and failing when a random 300 or 50 showed up for "no reason". (rollie)
     
  11. caspi

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    Well said! This should be a "sticky"!
     
  12. sincity2003

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    Thank you for posting this. We, too, were given the N and R speil and DS stayed on it for 7 months before we moved to MDI. I remember at the beginning of summer break, his numbers started skyrocketing and I was so upset, thinking I was doing something wrong. Then when they uppsed his insulin I remember telling my husband, how do we even know this is safe for him? I was clueless about it, and there are still plenty of things I'm clueless about. I've now started telling myself, Keep Calm and Treat the Number (which I learned here).
    I appreciate all the advice on this board :)
     
  13. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    If you ask my father to say anything about diabetes at all, he will say that in the hospital doing diabetes education, they gave the impression that it would be as simple as an algebra equation- find the correct ratios and then plug in the numbers and you're good. My father, the mathematician, will tell anybody that it hasn't worked out that way.
     
  14. KatieSue

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    Yes to all of the above. At the hospital we were also told once we got home and figured things out it would be smooth sailing. I wish they'd tell you there is no such thing as "control". Once we learned and accepted that fact it made life so much less stressful and easier.
     
  15. Michelle'sMom

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    I've found a single absolute: just about the time I think I'm one rockin' D mom & have everything figured out, it ALL changes. We have fancy scales, incredible technology & all these wonderful tools, but I think the very best tool we can have is our ability to roll with the changes.
     
  16. skyblufig

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    In our short 15 months since diagnosis, I think they'd be wiser to equate it to surfing; some days you ride the wave, and others you wipe out and get pounded. (but you get back on the board) :cwds:
     
  17. minniem

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    Very well said. Someone once told us, diabetes is like flying an airplane...you constantly make little adjustments here and there and try to keep it level and flying at the altitude you want. Also, I was told you can't control diabetes, you can manage it. After I finally accepted all of this, it has gotten easier. We are coming up on 3 years since diagnosis and we definitely take everything one day at a time, one number at a time. There is no rhyme or reason at times to this disease and I still feel that people who don't live this 24/7 don't really understand that. Even doctors/medical personnel sometimes will make it seem so easy. And I'm speaking as one, as I was a nurse in my former lifetime. In the hospital taking care of patients with diabetes, I never really understood the full life impact this disease has until my own son was diagnosed.
     

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