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The rules of punctuation thread

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by Jacob'sDad, Aug 29, 2008.

  1. Mom2rh

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    Answer me this...can someone be unorganized? I have always thought the word is disorganized but I hear Unorganized all the time.
     
  2. Lisa P.

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    I will get my panties in a wad about some written errors (although if I know it's on purpose, I'm good with it), but I LOVE spoken "errors". To me, it goes to that "there's no place left to this place" idea -- if someone can really pull off a regional dialect, with no posing, I'm thrilled. I've got a friend from Arkansas with the strongest and most genuine Southern accent ever and it's the best.

    I think we only get irritated by accents and dialects when they are like our own, we love somebody else's!
     
  3. frizzyrazzy

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    I also hate "I seen..." as in "I seen that tv show last night"
     
  4. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    I don't things have changes so much, I think people(teachers) have gotten lazy in teaching properly(not all), and students are made to pass the state exams, from what I understand.

    When my neices and nephews were in school, I complained when a teacher gave my neice 100% on a science test that was riddled with spelling errors(not typos, hand written), I was told it didn't matter because in the real world she could use spell check:confused:.:mad:
     
  5. Mama Belle

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    I personally like disorganized, but apparently unorganized is also acceptable:

    American Psychological Association (APA):
    unorganized. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Retrieved August 30, 2008, from Dictionary.com website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/unorganized

    Chicago Manual Style (CMS):
    unorganized. Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Random House, Inc. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/unorganized (accessed: August 30, 2008).

    Modern Language Association (MLA):
    "unorganized." Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Random House, Inc. 30 Aug. 2008. <Dictionary.com http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/unorganized.
     
  6. mapoe4

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    OK read thru all the post and still don't know about grammer punctuation and all that. I was really bad in english when I went to school. How I passed I w ill never know. I am a southerner and people tell me I got an accent no as bad as others but I use y'all. and ain't but is ain't a word? I don't proof read my post I just type away and post them somethimes I will find a mistake and sometimes I will fix it. But I ain't perfect and I don't want to have to reread what I type because then I get really confused.
     
  7. OSUMom

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    I haven't read this whole thread - it's long! LOL I work in the academic textbook world. I can tell you that publishers will sometimes make their own rules slightly about what they want in their textbooks. This can be frustrating when as an old ;) person I've learned rules one way, and the publishers want rules another way. There is not always one way unfortunately.
     
  8. Ellen

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    Is there a simple way to explain when to use affect vs effect?
     
  9. saxmaniac

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    It's usually:

    Affect - verb, "Pizza affects blood glucose badly"
    Effect - noun, "I dread the pizza effect"
     
  10. Jacob'sDad

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    I'll give you a hint. I think it's only quotation marks and commas. If you look up the answer on the internet, that's cheating.;)
     
  11. Jacob'sDad

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    What is the proper use of "any more" and "anymore". There are other words just like that but I'm drawing a blank right now.
     
  12. buggle

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    I'm just skimming the thread, so someone may have already answered this. And I offer the disclaimer that I suck at grammar, spelling and punctuation.

    Here is the entry on effect/affect from this great site of common errors in English usage:

     
  13. Beach bum

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    Ok. I'm a nerd.

    http://alt-usage-english.org/anymore.html
    "anymore" and "any more"

    by Bob Cunningham

    Opinion concerning "anymore" vs "any more" divides roughly into three camps:
    1. There is no such word as "anymore". It is simply a misspelling.
    2. "Anymore" and "any more" are two ways of spelling the same thing, and the two have the same meaning.
    3. There is a useful difference in meaning between the two.
    About the first two camps, little more needs to be said. Either statement stands on its own and needs no elaboration.
    The difference in meaning considered useful by the third camp is that "anymore" is an adverb meaning "nowadays" or "any longer", while "any more" can be either adverb plus adjective, as in "I don't want any more pie", or adjective plus noun, as in "I don't want any more."
    The difference between the two meanings is illustrated in the sentence: "I don't buy books anymore because I don't need any more books."
    The distinction of "any more" and "anymore" seems to be recognized by many, but not all, US users and by dictionaries published in the US. At least one British dictionary (NSOED/93) and some British users recognize "anymore" as an alternative spelling of "any more", but do not recognize a difference in meaning.
    The adverb "anymore" is standard American English when it is used in a negative sense, as in "I don't do that anymore." It is a regional or dialectal usage, mostly restricted to spoken English, when it is used in a positive sense, meaning "nowadays", as in "Anymore I do that" or "I do that anymore."
     
  14. mapoe4

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    Is "ain't" a word? I asked in my other post but it may have gotten missed.
     
  15. frizzyrazzy

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    ain't is not a word. For what two words would it be a contraction?

    correction: it's not a proper word but it is actually a "word". Still, it looks bad and sounds bad if you use it, and that may be snobbery on my part but I cringe when I hear it. I also disagree that it is a contraction for are not. That's what the word "aren't" is for.


    Pronunciation: \ˈānt\ Etymology:contraction of are notDate:1749 1 : am not : are not : is not 2 : have not : has not 3 : do not : does not : did not —used in some varieties of Black English
    usage Although widely disapproved as nonstandard and more common in the habitual speech of the less educated, ain't in senses 1 and 2 is flourishing in American English. It is used in both speech and writing to catch attention and to gain emphasis <the wackiness of movies, once so deliciously amusing, ain't funny anymore — Richard Schickel> <I am telling you—there ain't going to be any blackmail — R. M. Nixon>. It is used especially in journalistic prose as part of a consistently informal style <the creative process ain't easy — Mike Royko>. This informal ain't is commonly distinguished from habitual ain't by its frequent occurrence in fixed constructions and phrases <well—class it ain't— Cleveland Amory> <for money? say it ain't so, Jimmy! — Andy Rooney> <you ain't seen nothing yet> <that ain't hay> <two out of three ain't bad> <if it ain't broke, don't fix it>. In fiction ain't is used for purposes of characterization; in familiar correspondence it tends to be the mark of a warm personal friendship. It is also used for metrical reasons in popular songs <Ain't She Sweet> <It Ain't Necessarily So>. Our evidence shows British use to be much the same as American.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2008
  16. Beach bum

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    Ain't ain't a word and it ain't in the dictionary:D Actually, I think it is, but this is how I was taught in school.

    Ain’t is a contraction originally just for “am not”, but can include “is not”, “are not”, “has not”, or “have not” in the common vernacular. In some dialects it is also used as a contraction of “do not”, “does not”, and “did not”, as in I ain’t know that. The word is a perennial issue in English usage. It is a word that is widely used by many people, but is not standard English.
     
  17. StillMamamia

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  18. frizzyrazzy

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    dictionary or not, it sounds trashy when people use it. What if your endocrinologist said "well, these numbers ain't the greatest." I'd be packing my bags and finding another endo. LOL.
     
  19. mapoe4

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    okay but I ain't gonna stop usin it. this is the way I talk. Don't mean to offend anyone. I hope my kids do better in english than I did the only part I could get right is the spelling part which there are words I still can't figure out.
     
  20. Lisa P.

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    Oh, not me, I'd figure him (trashy phrase) for down to earth. Of course, that's reverse snobbery in many ways, since I'd figure he "knows better" but uses it for effect (affect?!). That's the problem with language, and the beauty of it. A doctor using ain't makes me feel better, because it is homey to me. Same doctor may send someone else packing. Sometimes I wonder if any two people understand any word in exactly the same way. 'Course my brother in law is into linguistics and the brain, so I find this stuff interesting.
     

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