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tested positive for thyroid antibodies - ??

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Julie, Sep 29, 2008.

  1. Julie

    Julie Approved members

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    Hello all,

    I'm not really sure what this means, was just told "not to worry about it" and that they'd retest in 6 months to a year.

    Has anyone else had experience with this, and in plain english, what does it mean for Stuart?

    Thanks for any input :)
     
  2. BozziesMom

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    I'd have to guess Hashimotos. Hey may have the antibodies without any hypo symptoms as yet.
     
  3. Abby-Dabby-Doo

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    In plain English, as I understand it... confused. Call them back and have them explain it to you so you aren't wondering and bothered by it.
    Either he has the antibodies that will someday effect his thyroid or he has elevated antibodies but not enough to be concerned about. I would go with he has the anitbodies that will someday effect his thyroid because they didn't use the word elevated.
     
  4. jcanolson

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    We just went through this with my oldest non-d dd. It sounds like they can tell that the thyroid is under attack, but it is still producing enough to keep him in the "normal range" on the TSH. My dd anti-body levels were through the roof, but her TSH was only in the high normal range. They did go ahead and start her on meds because she wasn't feeling right.

    Call them back and get a better explanation.
     
  5. kevin@diabetech.net

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    If this was from anyone other than a pediatric endo I would go see one asap. At age 13 you don't want him missing out on 6 months of tsh. I also seem to remember that the TSH screen was only an indicator and that there was another more expensive test required to confirm diagnosis so make sure there isn't another test he could have to confirm. 10% to 25% of kids w t1 will get hashimoto's and missing out on tsh equals lost growth and more. Caught early they can pretty much stay on track and then it's just a pill a day.
     
  6. 4.my.son

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    If your doctor has told you that you have tested positive for the presence of "thyroid antibodies," but you have a normal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level, what does that mean? Typically, it means that you have autoimmune thyroid disease, and that your thyroid is in the process of autoimmune dysfunction. The level of dysfunction may not be significant enough to register as an out-of-range TSH level, but the presence of antibodies may in fact generate hyperthyroid or hypothyroid symptoms.

    Many doctors will not treat patients who present clinical symptoms of hypothyroidism, test positive for Hashimoto's antibodies, but have a normal TSH level -- known as being "euthyroid" -- or, "in the normal range."

    There are, however, some endocrinologists, as well as holistic MDs, osteopaths and other practitioners who believe that the presence of thyroid antibodies alone is enough to warrant treatment with small amounts of thyroid hormone. If you've tested positive for antibodies, and have a TSH in the "normal range," but still don't feel well, you may with to consult with a practitioner who has this philosophy.

    The practice of treating patients who have Hashimoto's thyroiditis but normal range TSH levels is supported by a new study, reported on in the March 2001 issue of the journal Thyroid. In this study, German researchers reported that use of levothyroxine treatment for cases of Hashimoto's autoimmune thyroiditis where TSH had not yet elevated ("euthyroid") beyond normal range could reduce the incidence and degree of autoimmune disease progression.

    In the study of 21 patients with euthyroid Hashimoto's Thyroiditis (normal range TSH, but elevated antibodies), half of the patients were treated with levothyroxine for a year, the other half were not treated. After 1 year of therapy with levothyroxine, the antibody levels and lymphocytes (evidence of inflammation) decreased significantly only in the group receiving the medication. Among the untreated group, the antibody levels rose or remained the same.

    The researchers concluded that preventative treatment of normal TSH range patients with Hashimoto's disease reduced the various markers of autoimmune thyroiditis, and speculated that that such treatment might even be able to stop the progression of Hashimoto's disease, or perhaps even prevent development of the hypothyroidism.
     
  7. jcanolson

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    I totally agree. That is a long time to wait when they know the thyroid is going.
     
  8. 4.my.son

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    so basically it means in D terms . your thyroid is honeymooning.
     

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