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Teacher with type 2...

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by TheTestingMom, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. TheTestingMom

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    I suppose it depends a lot on the teacher as a person. But what is your opinion on your T1D having a T2D as a teacher?
     
  2. sooz

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    What difference would it make? I don't understand.
     
  3. Butterfly Betty

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    As long as they give my child the care they need, I don't care.
     
  4. TheTestingMom

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    My son started track today and his coach is a T2D (since '10). She was wonderful with him, pulled him out of class and talked to him about what he should do if he needed to take care of his D during practice. She talked a little about herself and told him it was OK to have diabetes. It really seemed to make an impact on my son. She is a 5th grade teacher that he could end up with. I can see that she could be a good mentor/example for him but also worry that her having D could also not be helpful, not so understanding. I'm sitting on the classroom placement form, waiting to fill it out.
     
  5. sooz

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    Is she a good teacher? She has already shown a very nice kindness to your son. I wonder how we would feel if, years from now, someone asked whether our children could succeed in their chosen profession. After all, they have type 1 D. She seems very helpful to me.
     
  6. Turtle1605

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    Unfortunately, I know plenty of people with type 2...none of them know anything about type 1. Sadly, many type 2 people I know are not provided with enough information to know a lot about type 2 either.
     
  7. emm142

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    It could be a positive thing if they are caring and understanding but realise that T2 and T1 are totally different illnesses. The time I can see it being a negative is if they think they know everything about T1 or are confused about the differences, but it doesn't sound like this teacher is like that.
     
  8. GreenJenny

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    My daughter's teacher has diabetes (not sure which type as she has not volunteered the info, and Im not going to pry). It has been a great year. I really like her teaching style and her personality, her having knowledge regarding diabetes has been helpful. Especially in comparison to last years teacher, who basically ignored it and fought me about testing in the classroom. For us, this has been a convienince.
     
  9. liasmommy2000

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    I would say it could go either way. I don't know that Lia has had any teachers with T2 but she has had a few staff members who work at the school in the latch-key program which she attends. I give extensive training and so far it hasn't been an issue.

    She also has a teacher this year whose dh has T2 and this teacher is wonderful. So far all the middle school teachers are but this teacher really seems concerned about Lia. And even though she has stuff for lows in her purse and crackers in the office etc, this teacher keeps juice boxes and crackers in her room for Lia. I've told her she doesn't need to but she had already bought some and said she felt like it was something special she could do for Lia and they are there if she needs them.

    However I do have a few coworkers with T2 and while one is knowledgeable and informed, the other two are not and I would hate to see them as teachers in this situation. Though one could learn I'm sure, the other is so stubborn and always sure she is right that she would be a nightmare I think. But then she would be a nightmare as a teacher to any student!
     
  10. cm4kelly

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    Just depends on the teacher

    It all just depends on the teacher.

    You could have a type 2 who could really understand your child, or you could have the same person who didn't have a clue.

    I would HOPE they would understand and be able to look out for your child - but who knows.
     
  11. MamaC

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    I would not make a teacher request based on the info you've presented. If they already have a coach/player relationship (as seems evident in your post), I might just pocket her as an extra helper on your D team.
     
  12. Lee

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    I don't even understand why you would ask this question?

    A Type 2 teacher can be just as good or as bad or as misinformed as any other teacher. If there is a reason that you think it would be a bad thing, then please include some details - otherwise it smacks of discrimination against those with T2. It sounds like your son has a great relationship with her already?
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2012
  13. mmgirls

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    my dd's teacher right now is T2, We do not have her do any of her care except to keep eye out for low/highs.

    She has asked allot of questions to understand things, but her T2 made no difference what so ever, she does not self test and just goes for an A1C blood draw and takes her meds.We have had some indepth T2 conversations and she is set in her ways and jaded by her families heavy tendencies to T2.

    I had hoped to open her eys a bit to the dangers of not actively exploring her DX, but only so much you can do while volunteering in class and at school.
     
  14. sooz

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    Just a thought, how would you know if any teacher he has had, or may have, had type 2 diabetes if they chose to keep it private? You can't. Honestly, speaking as a grandma here, and the mother of a teacher, you roll the dice, you teach your kid to understand there are all kinds of people in the world. Some teachers are great, some not so much, but the greater lesson is the importance of accepting people for who they are and learning to deal with situations. The lesson that a child learns by the rejection of someone with diabetes is what?
     
  15. swimmom

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    I just know that if I need to have a discussion about needs/care and the teacher interrupts me with "I have diabetes too!" I silently groan. It's always type 2 and I get the feeling that the teacher feels like they know what they need to know and is tuning me out. It seems to take much more effort to communicate the necessary information and impress upon them how serious consequences can be when the teacher already feels like an expert because they have type 2.

    Just recently had this experience with a HS band director when discussing an action filled trip to Washington DC planned for next year. He has diabetes too, so what's the big deal?? Argh! I'd really rather start the D discussion from scratch with someone who's completely ignorant.
     
  16. wildemoose

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    This is what would worry me. I remember this coming up a couple of times when I was a kid, with an assistant principal at the middle school and a Sunday school teacher who was a chaperone on an overnight trip around the same time. Both of them assured my mom they knew how to take care of me and then proceeded to give me advice that was worse than useless. It's a good thing I knew how to take care of myself or I would have been in trouble.
     
  17. sisterbeth43

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    Please don't assume that all T2 people don't know anything about type 1. I have been type 2 for over 17 years and my dd was dx'd with type 1 almost 14 yrs ago. I know a lot about both and so do many others. I have had teachers tell me they didn't need any info on what to watch for in my dd because their younger brother had type 1--well sir, times changed and care changed since your brother was a kid. At least her other teachers in the jr high dept were willing to listen to me and watch out for her. Since I worked at the school 2 hours a day, these teachers could let me know if anything was going on with her D.
     
  18. PixieStix

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    Quite honestly I have met some people with T1/parents of kids with T1 that I would in no way want them sharing their "wisdom" with my son. I don't really care what personal medical issues they might have, I am most concerned with them knowing what my son's care routine is, and that they are willing and able to provide emergency care as specified in his care plan if warranted. Would not want the teacher sharing her care routine/opinions with my son on a routine basis--not relevant.
     

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