- advertisement -

TEACHER needs info

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Andreaandi, Sep 12, 2010.

  1. Andreaandi

    Andreaandi Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    I am a kindergarten teacher who has never experienced having a student with diabetes before. The new school nurse was very willing to talk to me, but seemed unable to pin down the two things I need to know: WHAT TO LOOK FOR and WHAT TO DO when I see it! We have only had one day of school so far, and on Monday I will be asking to meet with the child's mother in hopes of getting information, but I was hoping someone could really clearly give me the basics, since this child will be in my room Monday morning and I want to do what is best for her well-being. Thank you for any advice you might have!
     
  2. StillMamamia

    StillMamamia Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2007
    Messages:
    13,195
  3. Barbzzz

    Barbzzz Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2008
    Messages:
    2,661
    Paula has some great links that I know will be helpful. But, I am sure that if the child's parents are anything at all like the majority of us who frequent the CWD forums (pancreatically obsessed :rolleyes:), they will come armed to the teeth with loads of information for you. :eek::D Kudos to you for being proactive on this, btw! :cwds:
     
  4. Andreaandi

    Andreaandi Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Teacher thanks you!

    Thank you so so much! That first link is EXACTLY what I have been trying to track down online, unsuccessfully. The other information is helpful and the kind of stuff the nurse was telling me, which is great to know of course, but isn't the direct life-saving stuff I NEED to know for the first days. I am glad to find such helpful people here. The mom sent her to me without any juice or anything the first day, just saying to call her cell if her child didn't feel well. Granted the first two days are shorter orientation days so the child was (and will be tomorrow) with me only for an hour and a half. I am hopeful that she intended to be more helpful before Tuesday's first full day when we will be going to lunch and having snack, and other situations. If I don't get the answers I need tomorrow, I will be back here begging for more help! Thank you again! :)Andrea
     
  5. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    8,240
    If you have the parents' phone number, I'm sure the mother (and the father too) would be so grateful to hear from you and know how much you care about their child and want to know what to look for even before the meeting.

    With your support, this child will THRIVE in your classroom. Kudos to you for reaching out.
     
  6. Ronin1966

    Ronin1966 Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2010
    Messages:
    228
    Hello Andreaandi:

    You are a brave woman, teaching kindergarden I mean ;)

    ======
    Talking to the parents, be direct.

    "...I don't know your daughter well, you are with her more than any doctor/nurse... will ever be. What is a dead give away something is wrong?

    Can she tell yet when something is wrong?

    She ever "cry wolf" or try and get attention when she's not low?


    You not the nurse will be dealing with any problem. The nurse gets the so called aftershocks, not the low itself.

    And in my experience bottom line, if there is a problem, that is sugar related, the rule of thumb is assume it is a low, and treat litely. If it turns out to be a high (unlikely) no severe harm done...

    ========
    Signs:

    Irrational total melt downs,,,,
    hysteria... (if out of character)
    weeping (w/o cause)

    Repeated behaviors, doing XYZ, ever and over as if "compulsive"

    Glassy/vacant eyes

    Putting their head down....


    Tired is fine but tired has to be watched like a hawk without letting them KNOW you are watching...

    If the child knows how to tell, you'll need a "secret word" between you that mom/dad agree and understand too. So that when you ask the child believing/concern they say ZEBRA (whatever your word), or they tell you ZEBRA....so you can continue teaching, grab the juice, give them the juice

    And no big deal...


    Recovery from a bad low normally takes 15-30 minutes. Relax, do not freak no matter what and be kind and upbeat. Worst thing in the world, is grown ups all looking SCARED or frightened.

    You sluff it off, and are nice about it, don't make a big deal, they won't either. Panic, and it spreads. THe name of the game is POKER FACE with a genuine smile.

    Let us know what happens... we are very interested,
     
  7. kiwiliz

    kiwiliz Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2008
    Messages:
    893
    I wish we had had you as our kindergarten teacher when our children were little! Very dedicated!:cool: What lucky children!:)
     
  8. Andreaandi

    Andreaandi Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    So we have gotten through week one. Fortunately, her parents did not send her to school yesterday when things were a bit chaotic (and unsafe in my opinion) after the neighborhood was hit with a tornado Thursday night! And yes,we did have tornadoes in NYC this week!

    Anyway, the rest of the week did not have any major difficulties, and my co-teacher and I felt much better with the information you all provided, so thank you! We did find that she drank a lot of water and we had to negotiate ways for that to be okay without the rest of the class chiming in every time. But honestly, I am still not so secure about things, such as that she came to school having not eaten breakfast and mom rushed in to get her breakfast. Or when she handed me apples for snack and said "I don't need to test her before snack, this will be fine, it is sugar that we have to adjust for" but when I said apples have sugar, she said it was only half an apple and would be fine. I have to trust that she knows, yet then she tells me she is often high. Then there is the fact that the mom still has not provided juice or glucose or anything to us, despite numerous conversations about how she will.

    The child came to us on Thursday to tell us that her pump beeped but she said "I know how to stop it." We called the nurse who showed us that the pump was almost empty, but like a car on E, has a reserve. No info on how long the pump would be able to continue after a beep, but nobody seemed too concerned.

    The biggest issue that has yet to be resolved is who is going to take her to the nurse before lunch and snack each day, since mom did it all this week, and she is not sure she will be able to continue to do so every day. I teach in a trailer because the school ran out of classrooms, and the child cannot walk to the nurse in the building without an adult. Supposedly paperwork is being filed for a paraprofessional, who we assured mom would not hover over the child, but merely be aware of what to look for, as well as be able to escort her to the nurse.

    Sorry to ramble on, but I figure the more I mention, the more you may find something you know about to comment on that just might help! Have a great weekend everyone!
     
  9. Barbzzz

    Barbzzz Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2008
    Messages:
    2,661

    Eeeek! Sounds to me like maybe the mom is a bit of newbie, too? I'd be curious to know how long this child has had D. Red flags all over the place! Plainly and simply, you have got this child's life in your hands and that mom hasn't given you the tools to keep her safe. I'd ask for a conference at this point, among you, your co-teacher, the school nurse, principal, IHP or 504-coordinator (if the mom filed the paperwork for one) and the child's parents.

    One thing, this forum does not have a ton of traffic... can you come on over to the parent's board and post? There is always someone around there.

    Oh, and glad you made it safely through the tornado(es). :D If it ain't one thing in the Big Apple, it's another. :rolleyes:
     
  10. StillMamamia

    StillMamamia Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2007
    Messages:
    13,195

    Ok, I have to say that perhaps this is a recent dx and the parents are still learning a few things, so be a bit patient with that part. (said in a non-judgmental tone:D, but as a friendly reminder) (although, being that the chid is on a pump, it may not be a new dx:confused:)

    Also, if the pump is beeping for low reservoir, it can be 1) that there is almost no insulin left OR 2) the alarm has been set to ring when the units go below a certain preset level (for ex: we have 40 as our "limit" and it'll beep if it hits 39, but we can easily go 2 days without having to change the reservoir. So check with the parents about this. It's a caution alarm that soon the reservoir must be changed, not that it needs changing right there and then.

    Also, I'd write down all the questions you have for the parents. Ask that they bring in

    juices
    tabs
    small snacks
    extra meter and pump batteries

    This may be of help to you to at least have some "point of reference":

    http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/parents/d_03_420.htm

    Maybe the parents can add in their own childs needs, so you have something to work from.

    In any case, the best is, when in doubt, call the parents.

    It would be up to the parents to provide the school with all of this, I think, but perhaps a little help is needed.:cwds:

    If you want to go one step further, ask the parents to include the carb count with each snack the child brings in. The Calorie King book or website are also good to use.

    The most important thing is not to project nervousness to the kid and deal with it in as calmly a manner as possible.

    Good luck.

    PS - ask about Glucagon use as well. Not sure about the laws in your state about this.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2010
  11. AlisonKS

    AlisonKS Approved members

    Joined:
    May 16, 2007
    Messages:
    2,391
    can the teacher let her know about a 504? I know Tony's kindergarten teacher is setting us up for an IEP (already have a 504) for other issues that have nothing to do with diabetes. She came to me saying sign this and we'll get started. Sounds scary!
     
  12. Andreaandi

    Andreaandi Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    AlisonKS - this child has a 504, although many of my students have IEPs, as we are an integrated class. The IEP process is not so scary if you ask a lot of questions and don't let people use what I call "Alphabet Soup" - if they say things like OT and PT, ask what they stand for and what those things mean! If you look at the IEP as a way to get your child the help they need, it is a very positive thing. If your child had a cough or broke a bone, you would go to a doctor and get the help they needed. This is the same idea, get your child the help they need so they don't struggle in the future. Good luck, and let me know if you have questions about this process - it is something I know a lot more about than Diabetes!
     
  13. Andreaandi

    Andreaandi Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    I hate to say too much, in fear that this family may be on this forum, but basically, this is not a new diagnosis, and the family has an older child who has also dealt with this, so I am not sure what is going on. Again today I asked mom to send juice, and she said she will. What else can I do? I don't think having a meeting with the principal is going to be productive. Thanks for the info about the reserve in the pump, and for the general support here. I am not looking for a ton of answers, just want to make sure I am on the right path and not being too demanding of this family. I always try my best to keep my cool, and not overreact, but I want what is best for the child. Thanks again!
     
  14. AlisonKS

    AlisonKS Approved members

    Joined:
    May 16, 2007
    Messages:
    2,391
    oops didn't mean to say the iep is scary, the situation you are in seems scary. I completely forgot in the middle of this back to school stuff to make a few emergency kits and the teacher reminded me to-I filled a bin full of fast acting sugar (only kid I know who won't drink juice lol) and I made one for the office too as a back up. I'm glad the teacher noticed some issues in the first week and suggested he needed some help-she said it's normal as a parent not to notice these issues when we are basically trying to keep a kid alive day to day but our son will get the help we need thank goodness.
     
  15. Andreaandi

    Andreaandi Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Sorry for the misunderstanding. Glad the IEP process is going well. Thanks for your input on my situation too! :)Andrea
     
  16. Flutterby

    Flutterby Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2006
    Messages:
    14,623
    At this point, I'd pass it off to the nurse. The nurse should be reminding the parents to bring in these things.. could it be perhaps this family doesn't have much for resources, like they can't buy the extra juice to supply school (and home?)? Just a thought.

    It seems as though you are taking on a lot of responsibility that other staff members should be worried about.. like how this child gets to the nurse. That is the nurse's job, not yours. Its up to the nurse to either go to this child or go get the child and walk them back to the nurse's office.

    Sometimes I forget to bring stuff into the school.. but it usually only takes one reminder.. not a dozen.. I always ask them to remind me before they run out, that way I can forget once and she won't be without. ;)
     
  17. Omo2three

    Omo2three Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    Messages:
    1,663
    Glad to see a caring teacher...thank you!

    I would ask the parent to come in for a meeting. ask your questions..and get the answers.

    1/2 apple is about 8 to 15 grams of carbs. Sometimes snacks of 15g or less are not dosed with insulin..it all depends on the individual.


    Don't fret too much your doing great...lows happen. We find the first two weeks of school challenging because all the excitement can make diabetics run higher or lower than usual About the third week...things should get better.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice