advertisement

Taking the SAT With an Insulin Pump?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by sszyszkiewicz, Nov 1, 2018.

  1. sszyszkiewicz

    sszyszkiewicz Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2013
    Messages:
    841
    So my son is taking the sat's this weekend. We did not even consider whether or not his pump would be allowed into the exam room with him, and we have not sought out any accommodations. He took the PSAT's last year and nobody complained about the pump, but it was in his own school.

    What has your experience been?.
     
  2. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,732
    The guidelines stated at the beginning of the test are very strict. The only things allowed on the desks are number 2 pencils and an approved calculator. All other electronic devices must be powered off and put under the desk. Items, including bags, are not allowed to be accessed during the test or breaks. If an electronic device makes noise, the student will be dismissed and the test not scored. No food or drink is allowed.

    With accommodations, pumps, blood meters, cgm (cell phone must be specifically stated in the accommodations or it will not be allowed), food & drink, extra breaks and extended breaks can be requested. The accommodations mean the student will test in an accommodated room rather than the standard room, and sometimes the testing occurs on a different day, depending on whether and when test administrators can be hired. I believe SAT contacted somewhere around seven schools before finding one where my daughter could test.

    The accommodations must be requested in advance.
     
  3. sszyszkiewicz

    sszyszkiewicz Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2013
    Messages:
    841
    Thank you!

    So how this turned out was I stayed up very late making sure he woke up at a good number (success....102), very low carb breakfast (6 carbs uncovered), he took off his pump and he did Lantus. Apparently this was his plan all along.

    My wife just dropped him off. The last ping on his cgm was 150 slight arrow up.

    I feel stupid for not doing this right, and next time it will be better, but I like the idea that he doesn’t feel like he needs accommodations. There was a resilience there, and a strategy. Next time I will make sure there will be backups.
     
  4. sszyszkiewicz

    sszyszkiewicz Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2013
    Messages:
    841
    So when I picked him up and he was all hooked up to his CGM he was around 300. Interestingly the G6 "remembers" the past, so I saw the trace for the entire time and he rose steadily. This makes sense for him. The lantus doesnt start working right away with him. if we were to do that again, I would have dosed him 2 units before we disconnected to cover the couple of hours before the lantus got rolling. He has started the paperwork for the next time.
     
  5. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,732
    He may just have needed more because of the testing situation. My daughter ended up needing 20% more, plus I think she bolus a correction in advance as well, knowing she could adjust with glucose tabs if needed.

    I can't find the article now, but I read an article last year saying the even having a cell phone in the room during the testing dropped scores by an average of 10% because it was a mental distraction. I remember thinking, "Then what does a cgm (or meter) do that not only is there but may need action taken." Just a reminder that even leveling the playing field with accommodations doesn't really...
     

Share This Page

advertisement

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice