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tachycardia with high blood sugar

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by ashley_lynden, Nov 18, 2013.

  1. ashley_lynden

    ashley_lynden Approved members

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    Anyone's child ever had this?

    Sloan's been complaining of his "chest hurting" for months. We assumed reflux (has history of it) and started him on 15 mg prevacid daily. Still complaining of the pain multiple times a week, he was upped to 30 mg daily. He's still complaining of pain. Now however, sometimes he complains that his "heart hurt." Yesterday he complained and told me his heart was beating fast. I put my hand on his chest and I could feel his heart beating pretty hard. His pulse was 125.

    He had an endo appointment today and I mentioned it. At first, she thought he could probably use an EKG and an day or 2 with a halter monitor, but then asked if it happens when his BG is high. I told her I really don't know. So, I'm supposed to start keeping track of his BG when his chest hurts.

    I was just curious if anyone else has had this problem with their child. Maybe the BG is causing it, but I'm curious if that's normal. Do they do anything about it? My father in law has lots of heart problems, so this just worries me a bit.
     
  2. mocha

    mocha Approved members

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    I have idiopathic sinusoidal tachycardia, completely unrelated to my diabetes. I know there's someone else with the same thing on the DOC (twitter is awesome).

    I started feeling like I was randomly having heart attacks about two years after being dxd with diabetes, like someone was stabbing a knife through my chest and my pulse would spiral up.

    They'll probably make you go through a battery of eliminations: caffeine, different foods, etc., especially if there doesn't seem to be a correlation with blood sugars.

    I will say that it sucks, and it hurts, and it's exhausting.

    Oh, and watch out for cold medicine. It can have stuff that will make your heart race. I found that out the hard way and ended up with a pulse of 300.
     
  3. moco89

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    It could also be POTS (postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome) or even orthostatic hypotension (which can result in tachycardia--a compensatory mechanism), in addition to what mocha said.

    I have orthostatic hypotension (not diabetes-related) and I frequently have resting tachycardia. I was referred a cardiologist after going to my endo two times in a row and having resting heart rates in the 130s during vitals. I actually sometimes lose my vision completely (go blind) after standing up, due to the low blood pressure, which results in less blood flow to my optic nerve.

    Diabetes-related tachycardia is more likely to be due to dehydration or long-term complications.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2013
  4. moco89

    moco89 Approved members

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    I am also really sorry that your son is going through this.

    I wanted to mention that all of the above mentioned medical conditions from mocha and I are forms of autonomic dysfunction, also known as dysautonomia (unless IST is due to a structural abnormality--seen in heart ultrasound). If this is not due to caffeine, some other medication interaction, or dehydration, the next thing that needs to be eliminated is dysautonomia/autonomic dysfunction.

    I have experienced several EKGs, 3 heart ultrasounds, 2 Holter monitors, 2 tilt table tests, and 1 cardiac event monitor (30 day arrhythmia monitor) over the course of my illness.

    If your son has dysautonomia, the autonomic dysfunction is probably limited (probably is predominantly the circulatory system, e.g., not involving digestive system), unlike mine, which is a good thing. My neurologist says that when your heart beats that fast, your body is working twice as hard. Dysautonomia is certainly exhausting.

    Finding specialists that are well-trained in dysautonomia are hard to come by, and they are mostly (and preferably) (pediatric) cardiologists that sub-specialize in electrophysiology, that have a lot of exposure and training in treating dysautonomia patients. If your son has dysautonomia or his pediatrician suspects it, I highly recommend using the "Finding the Right Doctor for You" link by DYNA Inc., an organization which serves youth with dysautonomia, to find a dysautonomia specialist. There is a pediatric cardiologist in your state that is well-trained in dysautonomia. Juan Villifa?e, M.D. is his name (his website http://www.mykentuckyheart.com).

    * Finding the Right Doctor For You

    DYNA Inc. is also great for finding reliable information and publications for school (504, etc.). In addition, they have a parent support group forum, if you join.

    If things do not continue to improve after seeing pediatric cardiologists (preferably electrophysiologists with training and exposure in dysautonomia), get a neurologist (ideally a pediatric neurologist--Gisela and Thomas Chemilimsky in Milwaukee, WI comes to mind--diplomates in autonomic disorders) on board, preferably a diplomate in autonomic disorders, relatively close to you. Also consider getting a pediatric rehabilitation medicine specialist on board too, for further assessment and physical therapy--particularly in a pool, eventually, if things still are going bad.

    Dysautonomia can be a very isolating illness. Many school-age children have homebound schooling or finish their schooling online due to the disease. I am actually in a situation where I am forced to finish my bachelors of science in electrical engineering completely online, due to my health and discrimination issues at my school (the story itself is pretty shocking).

    Unfortunately, you will likely have to travel to see doctors that know what they are doing, with treating dysautonomia.

    I really hope this is not dysautonomia, but this sounds like it to me. If he is diagnosed with an illness of autonomic dysfunction, he might be able to recover from it.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2013
  5. lmf1122

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    About a month before DD was dx'd with diabetes, she had episodes of tachycardia. She could walk from one side of the room to the other and her heart would be racing...it felt like it was beating out of her chest. She saw a cardiologist, had an EKG, halter monitor, but they couldn't find anything wrong with her heart.

    She has not had any episodes since starting on insulin, so I'm guessing it was either from the high blood sugars or dehydration due to the undiagnosed diabetes.
     

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