- advertisement -

Survey for Parents About New Glucagon Rescue Drug

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Jeff, Dec 6, 2014.

  1. Jeff

    Jeff Founder, CWD

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 1995
    Messages:
    1,546
    Please take a minute to share your perspective on a new rescue glucagon product under development:

    http://svy.mk/1u3rLDk

    I'm very knowledgeable about this product and am looking forward to it being on the market. It will transform glucagon rescue with a much simpler product.
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521

    LOL, must admit, Jeff, that the phrasing of the post made me think you'd been hacked. Could you tell us more about this new glucagon?
     
  3. kiwikid

    kiwikid Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    3,011
    Its all about that "needle" .... an age appropriate needle ( we used a 30 unit insulin syringe when Rachel needed glucagon when she was small - age 5 - and it worked beautifully) . That needle just looked sooo BIG!
     
  4. Jeff

    Jeff Founder, CWD

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 1995
    Messages:
    1,546
    In this case, the rescue glucagon does not use a needle. The survey question is about the dose.
     
  5. kiwikid

    kiwikid Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    3,011
    No needle? even better....
     
  6. swellman

    swellman Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2008
    Messages:
    3,544
    I find the question very odd. The difference that makes no difference is no different.

    Who would say "I want a smaller dose than an adult for my child because, well, just because."?

    If the side effects are the same and the risks are the same and result is the same then it's the same.
     
  7. valerie k

    valerie k Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,510
    I can totally understand people and the need for specific dosages on products. We are used to medications being smaller with our kids, and the fact, that more, is not always better but can be harmful. Who else has done the, "I have a terrible headache, the bottle says take two, so four must be better and work faster. We are conditioned that adults get more, kids get less. I have never had to give matt glucagon, but did my dad. I knew at the time, it was the full syringe. Had it been matt, it would have been much less, and then, have to think, how many units would I have to give him. This way, it wouldn't matter. I think that is beneficial when your faced in an emergency situation.
     
  8. Melissata

    Melissata Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,650
    I also find the question odd, but I know for a fact that a full dose gives more intense nausea, even in an adult. That is why we always used a half dose with a regular syringe after the first couple of times using the full dose. My son was a teen at the time, so adult weight. When given the full dose, he felt sick to his stomach the rest of the day. When using the half dose, it was very mild to no nausea. Makes sense to have smaller and hopefully less expensive doses for children though!
     
  9. jenm999

    jenm999 Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2014
    Messages:
    855
    I think the question is trying to tease out whether people will give up the ability to adjust dose in exchange for a simpler delivery device. I would. I have never used Glucagon (thank goodness) but I know that too much is not going to hurt him, and the ease of administration might be the tipping point that gives a teacher or grandma the confidence to give it to him instead of waiting for EMTs.
     
  10. Jeff

    Jeff Founder, CWD

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 1995
    Messages:
    1,546
    The company is trying to determine if parents will be uncomfortable using a dose designed for adults in their children. All data shows the adult dose is effective and safe in kids with no additional side effects. Or, perhaps said differently, the child dose is equally effective in adults.

    If the company has to make two separate products and submit both to FDA for approval, that will (a) delay the process and (b) increase cost, in the face of evidence that indicates that two doses are not medically necessary.

    This product is very exciting and will, in my opinion, completely change how we all look at rescue glucagon. It is truly a breakthrough product.

    And I have no stake in its success, other than that of being a parent and wanting a better product for my daughter.
     
  11. Snowflake

    Snowflake Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2013
    Messages:
    482
    We've never had to do a full-on rescue, but we did once use a very low dose to bring up an intractable low on endo's advice. I'd like to keep that tool in our toolbox. So, while it might be nice to have this new product on hand, I think I'd also want the injectable/adjustable version on hand for that kind of situation.
     
  12. valerie k

    valerie k Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,510
    simple answer to your question Jeff, YES, I would love to have something like that for matt. Here is hoping its easier to use then present glucagon.
     
  13. Cheetah-cub

    Cheetah-cub Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2014
    Messages:
    241
    I also said YES to the easier rescue glucagon. I think the big needle on the current glucagon is very intimidating to school staff to use. A teacher can say no, because he/she is afraid of it. I don't really blame them. I too, was afraid of needles before my child was diagnosed.

    I always wished that our glucagon can be made to be friendlier and easier to administer, kind of like the Epi pen. I think with the epi pen, you push on a button, and it self injects, and release the medication. The user don't even see the needle. A friend showed me his son's epi pen, and it looks just like a pen, not scary looking at all.
     
  14. wilf

    wilf Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2007
    Messages:
    9,652
    I agree. A simpler delivery device that would not be so intimidating to family, friends and teachers would be a godsend. A one-size fits all product would be simpler. :)
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice