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Sudden insulin sensitivity - Honeymoon?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by DavidN, Mar 24, 2013.

  1. DavidN

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    A few days ago our son went low at school after breakfast (very unusual). We cut his basal and afternoon bolus and he went low again. I intentionally under-covered dinner and he headed out to an evening baseball game. It took two 20g gatorades during the game to keep him above 100 (not a very strenuous sport). That night we cut his basal off for an hour then cut it in half for a couple hours and we still couldn't keep him above 100. I've cut his basal 35% the whole next day and he still kept going low. At bedtime, he took in two tabs and a juice box and we couldn't get him above 105. Last night, after basal cut in half for most the day, I gave him a juice box and two bon bon's (14g) and that's what it took to get him above 110. Last night, dinner bolus 25% reduction, basal cut off completely for two hours, juice box barely kept him above 80, so followed with another juice and 20g snack. That spiked him to above 250. We gave small correction and with a reduced nighttime basal rate he drifted down to 120 by morning (we usually get "stuck" when above 225 or so).

    Anyway, we're into our 9th month, he's progressively needed more insulin over the past five months or so, and then this. I thought his honeymoon ended months ago when his nighttime highs quit drifting down on their own. He's not sick. Is this a honeymoon recurrence of some sort? Or just normal ups and downs of a 9.5 year old boy? The sudden insulin sensitivity just seemed pretty severe and sudden.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Christopher

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    I don't think anyone can tell you what it is. Others may say they had a similar experience, or others may say they did not. The important thing is that you are recognizing his changing insulin needs and are dealing with them properly.
     
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    People mistakenly think that the "honeymoon" just flat out ends and then the islet cells are done. I don't think that's ever the case.

    We had times over the first 5 years when she had "D free days" or days punctuated with many unexplained lows which suggested that her body was still trying now and again to send out some islet cells and that they survived the T cell attack, for a little while at least.

    Perhaps that's not "honeymoon" but it's a transitional time of minimal and sporadic insulin production.

    And I'll echo Christopher, what matters most is that you are watching and responding as needed
     
  4. shannong

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    My son was diagnosed around the same time. Although I find it incredibly frustrating at times, my son's insulin needs can dramatically go up or down for no apparent reason. In fact we just got back from a vacation where he ran around on the beach all day, playing and swimming. I thought for sure that I would need to reduce his insulin. Instead, everyday he needed more and more insulin and we came back with him getting at least 30% more insulin. It went against all logic. I have also seen it go the other way, where he begins having lows and I have to cut back on the insulin. It's a roller coaster ride for sure.
     
  5. nebby3

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    Unfortunately that's D. I have heard it said that they will spit out one final burst of insulin before the honeymoon ends. Spring is notorious for bringing on lows too.

    Re the beach-- we find it usually means lows but if they are excited the adrenalin can make them high. Also being overheated will make my dd high. Fortunately ?? Here there is still snow so we don't have those problems yet :)
     
  6. StillMamamia

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    It could be anything.;) More activity, the end of a big growth spurt (we get patterns like that after having to increase dosage during a big growth spurt), weather changes....

    Just keep on being proactive.:cwds:
     
  7. Mwills27

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    Hi,

    I'm going through the EXACT same thing right now with my 10-year old son. It's the first time we've ever experienced anything like it. He's been Diabetic for over 2 years now. A couple of days ago his new helper at school took apart his insulin pen and put it together poorly, I only noticed by the next morning that it wasn't functional, but his BG readings were all excellent even though he would have missed two doses. He had been having a lot of lows prior to that, that we couldn't figure out. Now, the past two days he's had several lows, that it takes 3X the treatment to get him back to normal. I've reduced his fast acting insulin by 45% and his basil by 50% and increased his carb intake especially at bed time. We'll see what tomorrow brings.

    I don't know why this is happening, no extra exercise or illness that I can think of. But we're doing exactly what you're doing, watching, adjusting and waiting. Good luck to you!
     
  8. Ali

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    FYI
    I had days like that on a regular basis for forty years as a T1. It was always very disconcerting as I always felt like there was a chance I really did have a pancreas working again. Never lasted, but lovely for a few days. I am now fairly old and think lots of those variations in my case were hormonal. Now that I am close to sixty I rarely have that much of a reduction in insulin needs unless I exercise a ton. Ali
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2013
  9. wearingtaci

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    We have gone through this exact same thing with our 10 year old daughter a few times. She will run low,we adjust basal,then she jumps and needs more then before. This has been going on for months and it is the reason I tell everyone,"never use pen to write down anything about diabetes. It will change,soon"
     
  10. hawkeyegirl

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    Just a note - this thread was started in March. Hopefully the OP has a handle on things by now. ;)
     
  11. caspi

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    I didn't realize the date. I will delete my post.
     

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