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Strong-Willed Pre-schooler and food

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by bleaton, Feb 6, 2010.

  1. StillMamamia

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    Along with the good advice you've been given about giving the shot after a meal, I think you may want to change how food is referred to for the moment.
    Kids pick up on our own "anxieties", even if we think we control them. So, I can imagine my own kid hearing me say to eat his carbs, well, he'll ask why and refuse, just because he can.
    I would avoid the term "carbs" for a while. I know, sounds silly, but it's causing a power struggle between you and him. You want him to have the carbs, well, he'll just avoid the carbs.
    Did I make sense?

    Anyway, and yes replace the candy with some yummy no-flavour glucose tabs.;)

    And definitely reward when it's needed.

    On the slow-eater front...sigh...I know the feeling.:rolleyes:
     
  2. Becky Stevens mom

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    Yep I agree with this:) He doesnt need to know carbs from non-carb right now, just, " this is for dinner, if you eat your dinner you may have a cookie for dessert. (we do give a cookie for dessert, not sure if you do) I will sometime substitute a piece of whole wheat bread and butter if Steven really doesnt like what we are having
     
  3. wilf

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    Heather, remember these are "anticipated lows" that are the topic here. Son gets injection and balks at eating food. Parents worry he'll go low, and give candy to head off the low.

    Of course this canny 4 year old figures out how to work the system.. :rolleyes:

    But the thing is he isn't usually going to be low. Parents have measured just previously and know exactly where he is - milk in this situation will keep up BG and significantly reduce the incentive to work the system.. :cwds:
     
  4. Toni

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    He used to love carbs and now is refusing all carbs. I would also wonder if he really hates or is afraid of the insulin shots? Hope this is not the case.
     
  5. foggybear

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    My four-year-old son was diagnosed two months ago, so I know exactly how you feel! He is on a strict regimen that requires 45g of carbs at mealtime and 15g at snacktime (3 times a day). For a while it felt like all I was doing was either convincing him to eat or trying to keep him from eating. Overcoming the carb battle has been challenging. In the beginning, we had to surround him with junk food just to get him to eat. A lot of 100-calorie snack packs have around 15g of carbs each, so meals were often three packages of snacks (cookies and crackers), a few slices of summer sausage, and a couple of hard boiled eggs. As my son's BG numbers have stabilized, his moods have improved and his eating habits have returned to normal. I'm still struggling to get carbs in him, but now it's because he's eating his veggies first. Reese's Pieces are a secret weapon, too. A four-year-old fist-sized serving has very few carbs, so I can treat my son occasionally without worrying about it. Bottom line, if your son wants candy, let him have it if that is what it takes to get carbs in him. He'll tire of it soon enough. Lows are too dangerous for food to be a big battleground.

    For upper-end lows (high 50s and up for us), we often treat with "magic milk." This is simply a cup of milk mixed with chocolate Carnation Instant Breakfast. The whole cup has 38g of carbs, so a couple of sips is all that's needed to bring him up.

    Remember basic four-year-old parenting, too. This is an age where kids naturally start seeking some independence and control. Some things my son does that minimizes battles overall: chooses his clothes (from options), helps in his D care (picks a finger, opens the alcohol swab, etc.), helps cook (opens packages, stirs, etc.), picks snacks, does chores (helps with laundry, trash, etc.).
     
  6. Corinne Masur

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    Who wouldn't want to eat candy for dinner?

    Regarding the pp: If you use candy or junk food instead of regular food at a meal to get enough carbs into your child you are guaranteed a child who will refuse regular food. It may be necessary to consult with the endo and switch to MDI with a Novolog/Lantus regimen rather than NPH with required carb intake at each meal so that you and your child can have more control over how many carbs are taken in at each meal.

    To the original poster - have you tried other childhood favorites:
    chicken noodle soup
    sandwiches cut up into interesting shapes or made into a face on the plate
    french fries
    mashed potatoes
    hot dogs with a bun
    sliced fruit
    applesauce
    jello
    pudding
    custard (the kind made with eggs and milk not frozen custard)
    scrambled eggs
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2010
  7. Becky Stevens mom

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    Hi just wanted to say welcome to you:) My son was diagnosed when he was 3 years and 4 months. He was also on NPH and humolog, 2 shots per day and a strict meal schedule. He had 3 meals of 30-40 carbs and 3 snacks of 15-25 carbs. I found that if I didnt make an issue of him eating he would usually just eat what the rest of us were eating. It does make it difficult being on the NPH regimen. I do remember having to give juice at times to make up carbs. Luckily Steven usually likes to eat so it wasnt too much of a problem. If your son doesnt like what is being offered ask the endo about cutting his dose as hes probably honeymooning now anyway?
     
  8. Ali

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    Bolus after eating. Ali
     
  9. wilf

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    Welcome to the site - if you are having to stuff your young one, then it is time to reduce the insulin he's getting. Rest assured, it can be done. Talk with your medical team.. :cwds:
     
  10. foggybear

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    This thread is not about my battles, but I feel like I need to respond to all the comments directed at me. I have been fighting for MDI since day 1. My endo insisted we spend three months on 70/30 first. Every time I've asked the team for help, I've been given parenting advice and food lists but no help with insulin adjustment. I'm working on finding a new team, but the next closest clinic is four hours away so scheduling is difficult.

    I offered the solution that helped me get through a really tough first month. After having his world turned upside down, my son was searching for control anyplace he could find it. By backing off from the food battle for a while, it gave him a chance to adjust. Yes, it is unconventional to let a child eat junk food frequently. But it's better to let them eat what they want for a while and gradually reestablish better food habits than to fight over food and battle lows all the time.
     
  11. wilf

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    Agreed - if you're on a fixed regimen. If you're on a flexible regimen then you adjust the carb intake to your child's appetite, and then adjust the insulin to cover that carb intake.

    I think people are just trying to be helpful, pointing you toward the possibility of changing your regimen. If your can't find an endo that will give you the insulin regimen your family needs to live its life, then you could get yourself some good reference books and we could work through the steps necessary to get an insulin regimen that works for you.

    If you're interested, you can start a thread. If you're not, then that's fine too. I hope you don't think us too forward - many of us have been where you are and we're just offering alternatives for you to consider.. :cwds:
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2010
  12. Heather(CA)

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    OK, so if your saying to give milk in place of uneatten carbs, then I can agree with that. I still think it would be better to just give him the shot after he eats. I mean, what if he decides he doesn't want milk either...:confused:

    I do not believe in using milk for actual lows however...For the same reasons I stated earlier:cwds:
     
  13. wilf

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    We're on the same page.. :)
     
  14. Heather(CA)

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    That doesn't surprise me...:cwds:
     
  15. SarahKelly

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    I completely understand. My son was diagnosed in November and truly didn't start eating carbs again until recently. Luckily because of his age (19months at diagnosis) we were told to dose after he ate based on what he did consume. Often he'd only receive insulin for his sliding scale and not any carbs as he just didn't consume enough to get any insulin. Due to his low needs for insulin we decided the pump was the best solution, it allows us to give him as small as .1units of Novolog, which is great because he still is very particular about what he eats. I have started offering him two different choices at every meal, whenever possible I have him help make part of the meal and we treat lows with candy. He can't have juice as it gives him abdominal issues and there's really not other options. However, I do make a point that he has to have his blood sugar checked again and can only have one roll of smarties before being checked again. I try to not make it something exciting or fun as I want him to understand that it's just as much a treatment for him as is his insulin. Hmmm...not sure if that helps but it is what is currently working for us. I think if I were in your place having so many lows I'd try to switch insulin, or I:C ratios, basal rates or dose after meals. This is tough and we can all only do our best. I think part of what we have to remember is that this is our childs prognosis and we need to help them cope with it as best as they can. Honestly if just for a few weeks he is showing his power through food it'll eventually tire him out and he'll realize that he does want to eat...oh that reminds me my son who is 4.5 non-D will try almost anything that others his age are trying. Could you have a few playdates with other kids his age and have them eat together? Just another idea. :)
     
  16. hawkeyegirl

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    Actually skim milk is 32 on the glycemic index and apple juice is 41. Obviously juice is a little better to treat a low, but neither are that great. They're both categorized as "low GI."
     
  17. Kirsten

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    You've received some good advice. We needed to do NPH when my son was first diagnosed because he was in a daycare that would not administer insulin. It was very stressful. We had a few "go to" high carb foods: Frozen waffles, mango, banana, and chocolate milk. I would often end up topping off a meal with a few fruit snacks. Once we were able to get him off the fixed carb regimen by pumping, all the food issues disappeared.

    If you're on MDI, definitely think about bolusing after meals.

    GL!

    Kirsten
     
  18. Becky Stevens mom

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    Just some FYI about milk for hypos. I apologise for hijacking the thread.





    What is the treatment for hypoglycemia?

    If you feel that your blood glucose is too low, test it. If it is 70 mg/dl or lower, you should eat or drink 15 grams of carbohydrate quickly 1/2 cup of fruit juice, such as:
    1-2 teaspoons of sugar or honey
    1/2 cup of regular soda
    5-6 pieces of hard candy
    Glucose gel or tablets (take the amount noted on the package to add up to 15 grams of carbohydrate)
    1 cup of milk

    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) states that milk is better than juice or glucose because it has lactose, fat and protein that will help keep your blood sugar remain steady over time. A candy bar or other high fat sweets can raise blood sugar too high after you eat them and can contribute to weight gain.

    From the following link http://www.lifeclinic.com/focus/diabetes/Hypoglycemia.asp
     
  19. bleaton

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    Thank you all for your suggetions. They have been very helpful. I will have to talk with my doctors to find out if we can administer shots after he eats.

    As far as treating lows with milk....I do use milk to treat a low with my daughter. However, my son will not drink milk. Also, I do believe that milk works for treating a low and our doctors actually recommend using milk to treat a low.

    For the person that wanted to know if my son is terrified of shots....yes he is not a fan of shots. Shots can be a little difficult in our house. The worst shot is lunch because I do not have anyone to hold him while he gets his shot. It is rather difficult to hold a squirming kid and administer a shot at the same time. I do have neighbors available to help but I do not want to rely on our neighbors and I don't want him to get used to relying on other people either.

    I do allow my son to help with his D management. I do allow him to pick out his own clothes, games/toys to play with etc.

    We do offer our son applesauce, hot dogs, and all the normal kid foods that they all love. He would love them most of the time but now does not want them.

    The thing I know he will eat for sure is raisins, bread, pancakes and waffles.

    Please, I hope you all don't think I am being a pain or not a good mom....I'm just trying to come up with new ideas mainly because I am fresh out of ideas. My son, of course, does not do any of this stuff when my husband is at home on the weekends so it is hard for my husband to understand the problem. My husband is fantastic and is very involved in the treatment of our children.

    Hope you all have a great day.
     
  20. Jacque471

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    Thank you for posting that Heather. I swore that milk was slower and insisted that to DH when he gave some to Logan for a 69 that was then a 58 about 15 minutes later. I was starting to wonder if I imagined that it was slow acting and DH was right. (Heaven forbid! LOL)

    To OP, my son is 3 1/2 and although he knows the term carbs and looks sadly cute when pretending to read a food label or use the calculator to figure out his carbs, we don't battle over meals. We do prebolus for meals but that is because he is generally predictable in eating. He sometimes won't finish all of his carb food but generally we can either supplement with something to make up the deficit or we let it ride for awhile to see where he goes, especially if it's something that could cause a fat spike post meal anyways. Then at 1.5-2hours if he is just on the lower side of normal then we can give a small snack if we feel it's needed, if he is bottoming out, then we treat accordingly.

    We do have moments where he insists he is low to get some graham crackers or a sucker be we have been explaining to him that he doesn't need to be low to have a treat. If the timing is ok between meals he can have a treat or a snack and just get a bolus for it. We are trying really hard to not make food a battle or have him feel deprived in any way due to his D.

    Good luck. I know food struggles can be a challenge. I swear there was a period where we thought our now 19yo daughter would turn into a chicken nugget since that is all she would eat but she grew out of it.

    I agree with the others. If you don't know how much he is going to eat, don't prebolus. Or only prebolus a portion of the meal.
     

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