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storing glucagon at school...question

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by mandapanda1980, Sep 7, 2011.

  1. mandapanda1980

    mandapanda1980 Approved members

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    I took in Alli's glucagon kits to school today...was going to put one with the nurse and one in her "low tub" in class. The nurse(actually she's not a licensed nurse...but handles all D care) informed me that she keeps the glucagon kits locked up with her.

    I would think that there shoyld be onr stored in class...without a question. What if dd passes out in class?(heaven forbid) then what do they do...call the "nurse" to bring the kit down? What if she's not in her office? Then what?

    Is there something I'm missing? Must glucagon be locked up somewhere and not allowed in class? Should I bring this up and insist on the glucagon being stored in claas as well?
     
  2. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

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    Well, we keep it in the nurse's office because she's the only one trained to administer glucagon. I figure that he could need it anywhere, so the best place for it is with the nurse so that she can grab it and go.
     
  3. McKenna'smom

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    We kept ours with the nurse in elementary school as well. If something happened, the teacher would call the nurse and she would come. We haven't had to use it yet at school.

    This year, DD has 6 classes, so the nurse keeps the glucagon in her office.
    .
     
  4. Heather(CA)

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    Have you thought about giving the teacher a tube of cake gel frosting. she could start giving your daughter that while the nurse is coming...
     
  5. Amy C.

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    There is no sense in keeping the Glucagon in a place where no one is trained to use it. Cake frosting is a good idea -- as long as you teach the teacher what to do.
     
  6. denise3099

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    Yep, cake frosting in class, gluc kit with nurse. DD could be anywhere in the building when she goes low--I don't want the nurse to have to figure out where the thing is in an emergency. I want her paged and know exactly where to find it. Epi-pens are also with the nurse. The fact is that if no one else will even use it then why have it there. The teacher will be much more likely to use frosting than to whip out big red anyway.
     
  7. mandapanda1980

    mandapanda1980 Approved members

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    ok, I will put cake gel in with the low tub. That is a good idea, on top of the other low supplies. I will just keep the one with the nurse and go with that :)

    thanks all
     
  8. liasmommy2000

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    We don't have nurses in our school district. In elementary school it was the secretaries who would do it and a few trained aides. Lia had an aide assigned to her who would come when called via walkie talkie. She also attended the before/after school program etc. I felt most comfortable having one on her. She carried a small backpack with all her supplies as she tested/treated in class with the aide assisting. We also kept a back up in the office.

    Same now in middle school except the secretaries don't do glucagon, they have a few teachers who are trained and will be called.
     
  9. momandwifeoftype1s

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    Connor has glucagon in the clinic/office, and he carries it on his person in his diabetes bag. I like knowing he has access to it at all times. There are 5-6 people at his school trained in glucagon, including all his teachers. It makes sense for our situation, but it may vary due to different factors. He didn't carry glucagon until 3rd grade, when he was more mature and I knew he would not pull it out to entertain his friends. His 504 team agreed that he could carry it.
     
  10. DsMom

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    Last year, the nurse had one in her office, but he also carried glucagon in his supply backpack, which he carried with him at all times.

    Not to de-rail the thread, but people mentioning those who are "trained to use glucagon" got me wondering. If someone with D should pass out and a witness calls 911...would the 911 operator "talk the witness through" administering glucagon if it is on the person with D? I mean, can you really cause more harm to a person even if it is not administered correctly? The worst that would happen is that it is not absorbed...and then you are really in the same place you started if the person with D is already unconscious. It's not illegal to try to help someone with D with glucagon if you're not "trained" is it??? For my son's sake, I hope not.:(

    Well...just thought more and kind of answered my own question...I guess the witness could only administer glucagon if they were sure the person with D had LOW and not high BG. Guess they'd have to know how to test BG, too.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2011
  11. jules12

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    We keep are kit at the nurses office too - we have never had to use glucagon at school. I make sure there is gel in the classroom that they could use while waiting for the nurse. I like the glucose gel because it has an easy to open lid.
     
  12. Flutterby

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    We keep the glucagon taped up in the door of the cabinet of her classroom.. she also has one in her diabetes supply bag. I wanted it taped up in the cabinet rather than in the supply box so they can just grab it, they don't have to go looking for it.
     
  13. Lenoremm

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    I agree with cake frosting in the class and the gluc with the nurse but why locked? That seems like a mistake to me. Why not leave it with the nurse but in the low box. Even someone who is not trained can figure out the gluc in a pinch. There are pictographs on the inside of the case.
     
  14. Beach bum

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    It's fine if they want to keep it in the nurses office, however I would want it where they can grab and run. My daughter also carries one on her person at all times.

    Think of this scenario:
    Your child goes low, and doesn't have the cognative skills at the moment to test. Nurse comes down, but in that time, child starts seizing. Nurse runs back to the office, gets the keys, unlocks the cabinet, shouts for someone to call 911, then runs back to your child.

    Here is what you hope:
    That teacher is trained enough to notice that because your child is so out of it they can't test, things can turn from bad to worse in a flash.
    That the nurse knows enough to asses the situation to grab the glucagon when coming to your kids aid.
    That the nurse realizes the imporatance of having glucagon stored in a safe yet accessable place in the classroom, or on your child is key in an emergency.

    Don't mean to be an alarmist, but this was my argument when it came to explaining why my child would be carrying glucagon in her kit (which sits at her desk) at all times.
     
  15. denise3099

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    Oh, don't forget to "open" the frosting!! When you take off the cap you have to cut the tube to open it. Then just put the cap back on--it doesn't need refrigeration even after it's opened. You will hate to have an emergency and start looking for scissors to cut it open.
     
  16. Becky Stevens mom

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    We do keep the glucagon in the nurses office. Not sure if she keeps it locked up or not:confused: Suppose its a good idea so no one gets the idea to attack someone with a loaded glucagon kit:rolleyes:;)
     
  17. dragonfly

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    M has a bag that she carries everywhere that contains her meter, extra strips, sugar tablets, and the glucagon pen. That way she has it for gym, recess, art, etc.

    It's also part of the teacher's lock down/fire/tornado procedure listing to make sure the 2 diabetics kids have their bags.
     
  18. hawkeyegirl

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    Yeah, I guess we could stash glucagon in various points in the building, and if we really wanted to cover our bases, we could insist that people other than the nurse be trained on it. What it comes down to for me is that because he wears a CGM 24/7, the chances of him needing glucagon are about the same as the chances that I would need glucagon. I don't even carry it with me when we're out and about.
     
  19. sammysmom

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    My son carries one in his kit bag that he totes. He hands this kit bag off to his teachers (music, PE, art) when switching classes. He also hands it off to the recess monitor during recess. Everyone at our school is trained. Our district nurse found it easier to do a mass training instead of just a few people. Anyone new that is hired into the building is also trained. This is not ususally the norm, but I like it! Next yr when he goes to middle school, 2 teachers on every floor of the building and the office health people will be trained. If glucagon is needed and he (or any of the other 5 d kids) is with an untrained teacher a CODE RED is called out over the PA...someone on that floor is always available and can be there in less than 30 seconds. Again, it works for us. He carries one glucagon and one is kept in the office. I supply the office with a few extra since we have so many D kids at the school and some of them can not afford to supply the school with glucagon....which I completly get because our co pay just went up on that darn thing too.
     
  20. Heather(CA)

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    Just a thought, I would give it directly to the teacher rather then put it in the low tub. That way the teacher knows where it is and the child wont use it up so that it's not there in an emergency...:cwds:
     

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