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So sad today -

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by cm4kelly, Mar 18, 2012.

  1. cm4kelly

    cm4kelly Approved members

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    My five year old goes to church choir every Sunday afternoon from 4:30 - 6:00. I ALWAYS go with him and stay just because of his diabetes. People are aware of his condition there, but no one is trained to check him or help in any way.

    He is on a pump and every Sunday does great with blood sugars. I rarely ever check his blood sugar during children's choir because there is no need.

    Today I seriously contemplated leaving him and giving the teacher my cellphone number so that I could run some errands. He ALWAYS does fine was my thought. My husband and I decided though that I should stay with him like I always do, and I did so - but wasn't that happy about it.

    Around 5:30 during art time, I noticed my son was struggling to write his name and just wasn't acting right. I pulled him aside and checked his blood sugar. 36!!! WHAT????!!!! I quickly pulled out the starbursts and snack and had him sit until a recheck of 93.

    I then just started to cry - thinking WHAT IF? What if I would have left him - he would probably have passed out on the table before I got back. God was looking out for me today. The teacher said even though I have never left - that she will require me to stay with him from now on.

    So sad today - just a harsh reality check.
     
  2. Hstntxag

    Hstntxag Approved members

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    I am so sorry and I completely understand. We have only been at this for 7 months but I have had several of those moments.... Especially as summer camp options are drawing near.

    I wish I has great words of wisdom and encouragement- but just know you are not alone. Deep breaths and hang in there
     
  3. Connor's Mom

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    I feel for you! I almost did the same thing last night. Connor asked if he could just sleep through the night for once (I wake him to use the bathroom 3 times a night and test him since he's up). When the alarm went off at 1:00am I thought I could just turn it off this once he'll be fine...I woke him any way and he was 56. He couldn't figure out how to lift the toilet seat up to pee. He was awake too so, it wasn't a sleep walking kid thing. It took 2 treatments to get him above 100 to go back to a full sleep for him. Everyone tells me just once will be fine but, everyone I think I can let him do it because he's been fine for weeks something stops me and I test him any way. He is always low those nights. Guardian angels for the sweet ones!
     
  4. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I'm glad you stayed :cwds: but when you are feeling calmer you might want to talk with the teacher and do a little training. I don't think it's very kind for her to insist that you stay from now on, insisting that you train her to spot lows and how to treat them would be more in line with the setting, I think.

    Good luck.
     
  5. MamaLibby

    MamaLibby Approved members

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    i agree with Sarah. And hang in there! The independence factor gets slightly easier as they get older...but when Ella was younger I had far too many of those moments :(
     
  6. cdninct

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    Agreed. For 1.5 hours, it does not seem outrageous to me to set things up so that you check him at 4:30 and then have her hold the fort for a little while (with appropriate training, of course). I realize that she is under no obligation to receive the training, but I hope she would consider it.
     
  7. anna-bananna

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    First of all, let me say, "hugs, hugs, and more hugs to you!" Problems at church are so hard, because you don't expect it there. It gets to feel like a family and it's hard to think that these people who have always loved your child before would now not want them in their class, or would not be willing to care for them.

    I had a similar problem with one of dd's sunday school teachers last year (incidentally, when SHE was 5), and dd never even went low! The teacher just confronted me in the hall one day that it was irresponsible of me to leave dd in her class with written instructions on how to care for her. She couldn't keep track of "all" that info, she would not be able/willing to stop class to help/care for Emma, she insisted on having 2 snacks sometimes and no snacks others and it was too much for me to ask for her to have to work around the food issues with Emma. Didn't I know this other family with kids with food allergies and their mom brought their own snack and their kids didn't care that it was different from everyone elses, or that sometimes they just weren't able to eat the snack and had to sit out and watch everyone else eat, and dd just needed to learn that she was different and learn to deal. And this was an older woman (with children my age) that I regarded as a personal friend and mentor. :mad: :( I cried a lot that day, and our relationship has never been the same. The Children's Director at church was able to brainstorm with me on how to work it out and smoothed it out with the teacher, who eventually allowed dd to stay in her class and called me each week the night before or the morning of to discuss snack. Dd was fine in her class all year, and I just had to release the teacher as a friend and accept that I couldn't change her...I just have to let her be herself and hope and pray that God will change her heart. Not that I am unwilling to be friends, but she now avoids me like the plague. Of course she is nice when we come accross each other, but she no longer seeks me out like she used to, and is just "friendly" and not "a friend," as she used to be. I realized that day that D was gonna show us who our true friends were, and that's not altogether a bad thing. It's sad sometimes, but I'd rather know where I stand, anyway.

    As others have said, I would try to work it out with the choir director, first. If you find that doesn't work, then you need to take it to the next higher authority. (My dad was in civil service, so he taught me to move up the chain of command.) :) For us, that was the children's director (CD), and you may get some surprises there, too. For instance, our CD looked into the legality of the whole thing and found out that our church's INSURANCE does not allow anyone who is not hired (on the payroll) by the church or a licenced medical professional (nurse, doctor, etc), to do anything related to D care. :eek: (I'm not entirely sure that THAT's legal, but that's what she said, and I never pushed it, since we were able to brainstorm a way around it between ourselves.)

    So, the plan that we worked out, is that our CD was willing to be trained herself, and she identified the other people that would be in the hall at that time that would qualify. I trained her and she trained the others. (I could've insisted that I do the training myself, but she wanted to do it to keep it low key so people wouldn't freak out, and I am one of HER mentors, so I know her really well and knew she would be as thorough as I am, and she has babysat dd a time or two, so I felt confident in her abilities.) Your situation may vary greatly, and I wouldn't let it go until you have a plan that YOU are comfortable with. Then, since this teacher didn't have a cell phone at the time, we left 1 walkie-talkie in the room with her and the CD wore the other one, in case there was ever an emergency in class, she would have a way to get help (aside from yelling down the hall, of course). Yes, this seemed like overkill to me, but I just ran with it for dd's sake. I also always wrote my cell phone number next to dd's name on the sign-in sheet, so everyone would feel nice and comfortable. :) Now, dd has moved up into the grade school department and in that (different) building at the time that dd is in sunday school is a registered nurse with type 2, who is on insulin injections, so she knows how to treat lows and administer glucagon. Her job is to sit in the hall and make sure everything runs smoothly and keep track of who is coming in and out of the building for security, so she is readily available if dd needs her. All the teachers also have my cell phone number and I give them a list of symptoms to watch for, but also just tell them that if they see ANYTHING UNUSUAL going on with dd, even if it seems minor, they are to call right away, and I will come. Knock on wood, but no one's had to call yet, and we're about to have our 2nd diaversary.

    Oh, I also try to run her a little higher and almost always have her eat a snack about 1/2 way through any childcare/class/etc, (or right before she goes in, if it's going to be short) to ward off lows. Of course, anything can happen with D, so it's not a failsafe, but it's worked so far.

    Anyway, I know this has been long, but I hope that you can find a helpful idea somewhere in it, or just feel hope that someone else has been there and come through. :)
     
  8. anna-bananna

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    So...I got to thinking about it, and realized that I just assumed that your children's choir was at church, since OUR church's kid's choir is at that time. :eek: Sorry if that was an incorrect assumption on my part. Hopefully I didn't offend, and you would still be able to find support/ideas in my post!
     
  9. MTMomma

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    I just want to encourage you and offer some support. When I was where you are all I wanted was for someone to tell me that it will not always be like this. I suppose if they had I may not have ever believed them. It honestly felt like I was connected to him and would have to be forever. I was on a constant alert and it was overwhelming. So I am here to say, believe it or not, it will not always be like this. Really.
     

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