- advertisement -

Small rant about school districts cutting funding

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by Traci, Mar 4, 2011.

  1. Traci

    Traci Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Messages:
    857
    Our school district, like many others, is being forced to make major budget cuts. I found out today that our school nurses are on the chopping block. I am so very sad about this possible decision. They are cutting teachers, aides, and nurses. To the best of my knowledge, administration is not being cut. Don't they realize that one anaphylactic reaction in a peanut allergic child that results in injury to that child will create a lawsuit that makes these nurses salaries seem minuscule?

    But at least our district has it's priorities in line. Athletics, and anything associated with athletics--specifically football--will not be impacted. There is not an eye-rolling smilie big enough to indicate the huge amount of sarcasm I am feeling over that little tidbit.
     
  2. CoopersMom

    CoopersMom Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    Messages:
    55
    This is exactly what our schools are doing. I was going to post about it but you took the words out of my mouth. I am nervous enough with Cooper going to Kindergarden next year and now having the possiblity of having no nurse in school. Ugh!!!:mad:
     
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
  4. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    I'm so sorry to hear that! I don't know what our school would do without the nurse. Not only does she do the D care, she handles all the meds for kids who need them at school, does the vision screening, handles all the "epidemic" sort of stuff (when the flu or general crapatosis is going around, sends out letters), handles all of the "clothing" issues (bathroom accidents, lunchroom spills, kids who come with no hat or boots, etc.), and does all of the training for teachers on medical issues. My son's school is small (220 kids) and she is busy All. The. Time.

    I am actually a big proponent of school athletics, but if it comes down to that or the nurse, in my opinion, the nurse wins every time.
     
  5. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    You actually would want to use this smile: :rolleyes:

    I agree with pp. Our school would be sunk without our nurses (we have two who share between the 2 schools, 1 is always on duty at each school). Not only is there D, but a whole bunch of other conditions, diseases, ailments. They are always pretty busy.

    I'm sorry this is happening, this is actually one of the main reasons why we would not move out of our town. 1) Because we have a school nurse 2)Because we have school nurses who actually know how to think logically (aka think like a pancreas) when it comes to diabetes. I have always said that if they even talk about getting rid of the nurses I would stand up before the school board with a glucagon, talk about a seizure and ask, would you be willing/able to administer this to my child in a time of crisis?

    The sad thing is is that these nurses will probably be cut. Then there will be absolute outrage when something terrible happens that could have been handled quickly and confidently by the nurse. Then there will be a big push to get nurses back into the school, when they never should have been removed in the first place.
     
  6. Traci

    Traci Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Messages:
    857
    It's just so frustrating! We live in an affluent area, but they won't raise taxes to make up for the shortfall. I know the economy is bad, but unemployment in our city is about 2% according to the latest reports.

    Our nurses are phenomenal! Our endo actually tells newly dx'd patients that if they are in our district, they will be well taken care of. They sit down with me every year and ask, "what do you need?" and "what can we do for your child?".

    I'm certainly not anti-athletics, but the health of the children and the academic education of those children should come first. Our area could easily switch to a pay to play for athletics (most parents pay for sports until middle school anyway) and significantly lower the budget deficit. These are the same parents who are paying for pitching and hitting coaches for their second graders, for heaven's sake!

    Hug your sweet nurses!
     
  7. Tripletmommy

    Tripletmommy Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2008
    Messages:
    410
    Almost word for word what I was about to write!! I am fairly certain our school would shut down if it wasn't for our nurse! :D We are very fortunate to have her as well as a health aide for our 2 T1's. If they do end up cutting the nurse, might I suggest fighting for a 1:1 aide for the classroom to be trained and manage all aspects of T1. Maybe try to have something put into a 504?
     
  8. Traci

    Traci Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Messages:
    857
    Kally, hi! Long time, no hear! Was another of your daughters diagnosed or did you mean that there are two type 1's at your school? Hope you are all doing well! Your girls are beautiful!

    Sorry for the OT, but it's good to see you on here.
     
  9. Tripletmommy

    Tripletmommy Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2008
    Messages:
    410
    Thank you, we are doing great!! I'm glad to be back!!! :D
    We have 2 T1's in our school, and fortunately, the other child started K with us 2 years ago, so he and Bella have been together for the past three years and it's such a wonderful little friendship they have! Madison even said once "Maybe Bella and 'C' will grow up and get married and have lots of diabetic babies!!" haha.... Gotta love 7 year olds.... :rolleyes:
     
  10. AlisonKS

    AlisonKS Approved members

    Joined:
    May 16, 2007
    Messages:
    2,391
    we live in one of the richer districts in our town-and there is only one school nurse for the whole district. It's ridiculous, they are always fundraising for a new playground (the one they have looks fine to me) and other things but the health of kids doesn't seem like a priority. She drives around all day from school to school. Next year will be scary when he requires an insulin shot at school, they are asking if he can get on the pump yet they are also telling me about all of his sensory issues which prevent a pump:rolleyes:
     
  11. Ronin1966

    Ronin1966 Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2010
    Messages:
    228
    Hello Traci:

    Each school nurse here makes 80K+ per year.

    We have four administrators who never see a classroom and their executive secretaries all of whom make far in excess 100K per person. The principals, the vice principals and all of their secretaries... all all make 100K and over too.

    Yup, makes sense to cut the nurses doesn't it...


    My joined sarchasm (to yours) aside in all candor, I am not sure we truly need them. Analphaxis <sp.?> does not require a medical degree just an epipen or benedryl... ASAP.

    Low sugar, high suger pretty simple too... unless somebody is a trained pump expert their "medical training" does not help too much... IMHO-IMHE.


    Stuart
     
  12. Traci

    Traci Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Messages:
    857
    That's quite an amazing salary! Our nurses make no where near that! Our superintendent makes $225k and we have about 32,000 students k-12. I realize that medical training is not a necessity for most things, but if my child is unconscious from a low blood sugar and requires glucagon, I want someone with ZERO hesitation there to give him the gluc, not a teacher who might get too nervous, who might have forgotten how to do it, who might feel the need to discuss the legal ramifications, etc. Also, if I were a teacher, no way would I want the responsibility! Who's going to check dosages for all the add/adhd meds that kids seem to get these days? We just recently had a "nonnurse" give a child a lethal dose of heart medicine in a nearby district! I would like to think that a nurse would not make that mistake.

    I still say if they've got millions for athletics, there's room for compromise to
    keep our nurses. If we simply made athletics pay for play, we could save every teacher and nurse that they are letting go. Every child benefits from the teachers, any child at any time could possibly benefit from the nurse, and while a certain percentage of students participate in athletics (and still could if it was pay for play), not one single student from our district has ever made a professional career out of a sport, so to me, the order of importance in a school should be teachers, nurses, athletics...but for our area, athletics comes even before the teachers!
     
  13. PatriciaMidwest

    PatriciaMidwest Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Messages:
    1,297
    I'm sorry too -- I hope you can convince the school board to keep the nurse! I would be upset about this too. A nice compromise would be keeping the nurse and charging a fee to students on athletic teams. I doubt that our school nurses make 80K a year but I can't say for sure.
     
  14. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    Can you please cite your source for this?

    Everything I have read about school nurses' pay, indicates that the average, nationwide, is about 45K. And for their level of education, school nurses are less well paid than nurses with comparable education in every other employment setting.
    Here's just one source
    http://www1.salary.com/School-Nurse-salary.html
     
  15. Traci

    Traci Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Messages:
    857
    I just downloaded all 400 pages of our detailed budget. The entire budget for health services is 1.5 million. We have 43 nurses. That's an average salary of about $35k a year if nothing else is coming out of the health services budget. For athletics, payroll only is over $6 million. I'm not sure how many coaches there are at each school, but I know that $80k was a head coach's salary over ten years ago. I'm sure it has increased. We only have four high schools and six middle schools that have athletics programs, so not sure of the math there and what salary totals are for those programs.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2011
  16. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    Wow, your school district is very generous in paying your nurses. Can I ask what part of the NE you live in?

    You say that nurses may not truly be needed...but can you count on a lay person to jump into triage mode when an emergency arises? I'm thinking of people at our school, and while they are great, very nice etc. I can't picture them (except for our PE teacher who is emergency trained) jumping in quickly and remembering what to do in a time of crisis. I also know that when it came to the pump they would most likely not be as flexible in adjusting insulin doses as a nurse would be, we'd have to have specifics written into the 504.
     
  17. mamamccoy87

    mamamccoy87 Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2008
    Messages:
    529
    DITTO!!! Our school has over 600 kids - 5 type 1s, 3 or 4 SEVERE peanut allergies - asthma and a student who has his own AED :eek:
     
  18. alila

    alila New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    first, i would like to know where the poster, who stated that school nurses make 80k a year, lives. because i need to move there. stat. i am a school nurse and i've never heard of anyone making that much money doing this job in the average public school.

    second, in some- quite a few- states, school nurses are actually medical assistants, not registered nurses. no district that i can imagine, would pay to staff every one of its schools with a registered nurse. my city, for example, has about 60+ public schools. there are only 3 nurses, each of which oversees a cluster of schools. they are paid about 30-40k per year. each actual school has a medical assistant, assigned to that school. we work hourly, not salary, and we do not work a full school day. i make less than 9,000.00 per year. on average, a medical assistant in my position makes 10-13k.

    third, people like you are the exact reason school nurses are necessary. you can't even spell anaphylaxis, yet you think you can handle someone who is going into anaphylactic shock. Anaphylactic shock requires more than just an epi-pen and benadryl. it requires someone who knows what signs to look for (because it does not always happen instantly, anaphylactic reaction can happen in stages), has the presence of mind to act according to the child's care plan and not just do what they heard was supposed to be done, and the ability to determine what to do next in case the epi-pen isn't working. hypo and hyperglycemia require someone to be familiar not only with the symptoms, but with the child, as each child is different, and a knowledge of what to do in case of either. who, exactly, might you think would be willing to do that? the teacher, who has a room full of kids all demanding attention? the secretary, who has an office full of teachers demanding attention? the principal, who has a building full of everyone demanding attention? a volunteer, with no medical training or credentials other than the fact that they have nothing to do but hang posters in the school hallway all day? would you feel comfortable, if your child were hyperglycemic, telling a random person walking down the street to decide how much insulin your child required and then give it to them? no, you would not. you would take them to the nearest hospital, clinic, or medical center, and rely on trained medical personnel to do the best job possible for your child.
    that is what a school nurse does.
    in addition, for the pleasure of 9k a year, we are the ones who track patterns of illnesses, offer community support programs to families that have fallen on hard times, watch and report child abuse (because most teachers, though they are first-responders and have the right to make the call, simply will not, for fear of alienating the parent.) we offer help to the school office, particularly elementary schools, who are so overwhelmed in paperwork that it often takes more than one to get the job done.
    in schools that do not have psychologists or psychiatrists, we are the shrinks. we are the ones who talk to your kid after grandpa joe dies and they sit at a desk and cry all day. we are the ones who offer a safe haven for kids who may feel like they don't have anyone else to talk to. i've had kids on the verge of suicide come and talk to me because they felt unable to talk to their teachers, parents, or friends. i've listened to confessions of rape, abuse, anger, unwanted pregnancy, suicidal thoughts, low self-esteem, and shame, because no one else had the time to hear them.
    in impoverished areas, we are often the only medical attention that child is getting. i have seen children with rotten teeth, had them come in with rashes and all manner of illness, because the mother was too poor or inexperienced (i'm being generous) to take the child to a doctor. i have spent countless hours referring people to doctors that donate time, clinics that donate equipment, and companies that offer free medication. where else in the school are these resources going to come from?
    we are the smallest portion of a school budget. classroom assistants, who basically fingerpaint and walk the classes down the hall, get paid more than we do. the janitors get paid more than we do, and half the time they don't even sweep the floors.we get paid very little money and zero respect to do a job that, if we were not there to do, nobody else would bother doing.
     
  19. DsMom

    DsMom Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2010
    Messages:
    1,700

    I hope you're not feeling disrespected--I think everyone here hugely supports our school nurses. Just last week, when my son's BG was very high at the end of the day and it looked like a site problem, our school nurse called us after dinner to check in and make sure he was okay. Our other nurse has been a big support to me as we've gone through the process of helping my son with his ADHD. Both nurses love my son and he loves them. We are extremely lucky--and I wish the original poster of this thread the best of luck in fighting for her school's nurses. You state your case very well here and am sure you will with the school board as well. It's reprehensible that they are considering this.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice