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Silly idea?!?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Carrie, Mar 29, 2007.

  1. allisa

    allisa Approved members

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    There must be something in the air.....I was just at a parents forum for kids with Autism and this idea came up.

    Handing out business cards to explain that the child is NOT misbeahving or being a brat....they are autistic and can't stop their behaviors !

    That is a lonnnggggg conversation to explain THAT to onlookers at the mall or playground !

    Staples carries business cards....very easy to customize and print out....cutting is done easily....they just bend and snap.....and they are cardstock.....

    LOL....I'll ahve business cards for Autism, Down syndrome and Diabetes Awareness !!
    hhhmmmm....maybe I need one for frenzied/hectic mom syndrome :D
     
  2. Flutterby

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    I think this is a great idea.. I had someone say that I was text messaging when giving K insulin through her pump.. I looked at her and said ya, I'm texting her pancreas to give her insulin.. if you don't know what it is.. ask.. but don't tell your kids something stupid..

    and my dad has type 2.. he doesn't get it at all.. his is under great control.. he doesn't test, but gets his A1c done every 6 months (use to be 3, but because he's doing so well, its now 6) anyway, he's just stubborn and doesn't get that K can't just eat.. she needs to be checked.. and he counts sugar.. we count carbs.. so he thinks sugar free is OK.. but it usually has more carbs..

    and then there is my FIL.. just dx with type 2 a few months ago.. after K was dx.. and I often here him say.. I feel low.. umm.. you aren't on pills so you can't go low like K does... when he feels 'low' he's actually in a normal range.. like 120, but because he's spending more time higher he's feeling low at 120.. but I just shut my mouth with him.. he likes to argue an as long as its not hurting K.. then its OK with me.. whatever.. but I do say something when we are out..

    some people just don't get it.. these cards aer a GREAT idea!
     
  3. jeep_bluetj

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    But here's the problem - Why should Jane Q Public understand T1 D? It truely affects a very small percentage of the population. T2 is a way larger issue (population percengage wise) and is what people thing D is.

    As an example: How many of y'all know what Retinitus Pigmentosa is? Do you care? Does it affect you? It does me. It affects my every waking moment in a significantly negative way, but I don't expect random people at wal mart to understand why I cant see.

    Heck, lets face it, most random people at walmart don't undertand words like halitosis or flatulence, why should they understand the details of T1D.

    Its unfortunate. It's sad. We want others to understand. But for the most part, they don't have the personal reason to understand. It's just the way it is.
     
  4. hold48398

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    Well I for one went to google "Retinitus Pigmentosa" because I WANT to know what it is. I think everyone has a natural curiosity for other people's health, and some actually aren't as ignorant as we think! They just don't know.
     
  5. jeep_bluetj

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    It would help y'all's googling if I spelled things correctly. Sorry... :)

    My point is that 100% of the western world knows what you mean when you say "my kid has a cold". A far fewer percentage than that knows what you mean when you say "my kid has T1D". They think they do, but its the same as cancer - the average person thinks they understand cancer. But not all cancers are the same.
     
  6. selketine

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    People never say stupid things to me (with one terrible exception - and let's just say the grown man was crying when I was done talking) about William's diabetes. Maybe I'm just too bad-&^% looking.:p Otherwise I really don't pay much attention to comments and questions from type 2 folks - they are just trying to understand - and relate type 1 to what they probably know which is type 2. Perfectly understandable. Most folks are just making small talk and trying to relate and don't really want or expect a big education on the subject. Those who do usually get it.;)

    I think if it is a problem though the cards are a great idea. A non-confrontational education tool for those seeking info.
     
  7. bensgirl

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    Carrie, I think your idea of creating a business card in fantastic! I feel like sometimes we are just talking to ourselves, saying the same things over and over again, with no one listening!
    An older gentleman in the mall told us how if "we prayed hard enough" that Alexander would not have to take insulin anymore, "just like the little girl in their church."
    We are told over and over again, how "Alexander will outgrow this" and no matter how many times, you reply no he will not, they say the same thing.
    We were out last week, and Alexander said he felt low, his legs were hurting, (always a sure sign he is low) checked 48, so while I was treating the low, in a cafe shop, a lady that worked there, was second guessing what I was doing to treat his low, with all of her helpful comments! :rolleyes:
    Anyway, I guess what I have realized is that not many people understand what Type 1 diabetes is, and most people seem to not listen when you try to explain it.
    Alexander always says that he has Type 1 diabetes, not Type 2 like Grandma Christy. :)
     
  8. Carrie

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    Oh, man...what have I started?!? :rolleyes: On a small little girl, a pump pack is a pretty obvious thing (especially her black one with the bright polka dots of every color on it). And, lets not forget if her tubing is hanging out of it.

    Example: I walked into my daughter's Sunday school class a couple weeks ago and she had three new teachers. I walked up to the two older ones and calmly said, "I just wanted to let you know that Emma is a diabetic", and went on to tell them things to look for if she was high or low. The one lady's eyes got huge! I apologized the next week for springing that information on her like I did. She said, "Oh no, you're fine. My husband has diabetes.", like she knew exactly what I was talking about. :( That's the ignorance that I don't have time to stand and explain to people. Like one parent said, if you don't live it, you can't understand it. And no matter how much I might try to explain, they probably wouldn't get it anyway. Is it my job to correct them? No, probably not. But I don't want them to assume anything. My daughter doesn't test her blood in the morning, take a pill, and watch what she eats for the rest of the day. People are curious. I guess I would rather face ignorance head on then to have someone assume they already know the facts. And the facts are that what my daughter has is not the same as someone with Type 2. I'm not going to stand by the greeter at Walmart and hand out cards, but if the opportunity arises to set someone straight with accurate information, I think it would be a quick, easy, and non-offensive way to do so and educate people in the process.;)
     
  9. Anne

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    Oh Carrie I think what you have started is a type of grassroots effort to educate and enlighten people! A few days back there was a thread entitled "Medtronics and Diabetes Education" which cited a Harris Interactive poll that shows only 1 in 5 Americans knows the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and 2 out of 3 believe Type 1 is "curable"! Does anyone else find these statistics as disturbing as I do? We have an awful lot of people to educate!
    Anne
    (I still think a name change is in order! To me, they really seem to be 2 different, distinct diseases.)
     
  10. deafmack

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    I would be happy if people would ask me what I do for my diabetes care and realize diabetes care is an individual thing and no two of us are alike, whether on insulin or meds. I wish people would stop comparing my care to their Aunt Gert. I may have type 2 but I am not their Aunt Gert. I have friends who are type 2 and are insulin dependent and I do get it. My first rule is Do not assume anything about a person and their diabetes regardless of the type.
     
  11. deafmack

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    I do know what RP is and especially when it pertains to the Deaf where it is called Usher's Syndrome. I have several Deaf-Blind Friends with it so I do understand.
     
  12. deafmack

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    I hate stereotypes too. and I do not have your grandma's diabetes or Henry's Diabetes. I have diabetes period. I hate it when people think all people with type 2 are overweight. Many of us are not.
    I would love it if people would learn the truth and stop making blanket statements about type one and type two diabetes. period.
     
  13. bethdou

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    But if Jane Q Public is either asking <potentially rude> questions or spouting misinformation (like the "if you just quit eating sugar" or "if you took this vitamin you wouldn't need insulin"), then I think it's my job to educate them. If they are "concerned" enough to make comments or ask ?s, then they need to have the right information. If someone doesn't ask me or doesn't make an uninformed comment, then I won't say anything. If someone asked you about RP and had the wrong ideas about it, you would straighten them out, wouldn't you? :)
     
  14. jeep_bluetj

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    Ahh... you've got a good point there. And part of the problem is indeed that people think "D" is Aunt Gert taking a few pills a day. And it's not. Just like the average population wouldn't know what Celiac is. (Or truely what RA is, instead of Aunt Gert's sore fingers)
     
  15. Illinifan

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    Again, the issue is what effect can the "well-intentioned, but ignorant" people have on my kid?

    If they are in authority over your child, then the implications can be disastrous. There are plenty of stories of teachers, prinicipals and even school nurses on this website who didn't have a clue.

    If you have a little one who still considers all adults to be smarter and wiser than he or she is, then the "well-intentioned, but ignorant" can set up a conflict between you and them. "But Teacher said..."

    I think the cards are a great idea. But I'm also the guy who bought his teenage long-haired soccer player son a t-shirt that says "Yeah, I know I need a haircut." ;)
     

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