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Shotblocker to use or not to use?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Melanie, Dec 5, 2005.

  1. Melanie

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    My daughter Rayana is 3 years old. She has had D for a little over a year. Her Endo tells me that I should not use the shot blocker that we have been using because then she will become too reliant on this tool. she is getting 5 injections a day. I feel that it helps make the process of the injections go a lot smoother. Do you think I am wrong for letting her use this?:confused:
     
  2. Amy C.

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    Just because you aren't using injections in the standard manner, doesn't mean your daughter would be too reliant on the shot blocker. This is just a variation to get the insulin into the body. Some folks use pumps, others a pen, some use inject-ease devices to help with shots, others use an insulon device. The important thing is that she receive her insulin.

    You may grow tired of using it and when the time comes for her to give herself shots, it may not be handy.

    I wouldn't stop using it.
     
  3. Sweetkidmom

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    Excuse me, but what is a shot blocker?
     
  4. Amy C.

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    "Shotblocker quickly and effectively blocks the pain from injections such as immunizations, insulin and allergy shots without the use of medication. It works by stimulating the skin with multiple blunt contact points on its underside. The sensation this produces blocks the pain signal of the needle-poke from reaching the brain. The result is a pain-free injection!"

    The picture is attached.

    Source: http://www.diabetesnet.com/ishop/pr...d=586&osCsid=308cb2fc52a74f8340fefdf8592f9c10
     
  5. mischloss

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    Wow, you learn everyday. I am definitely getting one for my son immediately! He has so much pain trying to do his thighs each evening! Won't even touch tummy or tushy for shots, so basically we are down to his arms. I am also going to be ordering the Insuflon Infusion patch for him but in the mean time, this shotblocker seems like a great idea. Thanks again!
     
  6. Sweetkidmom

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    I think this looks absolutely brilliant (never seen one before) and I get very peeved when doctors discourage aids because one may become too "reliant". I would trust your mother's instinct, which says that making the necessary procedure less painful has to be a good thing.

    We used the Penmate (which hides the needle from view during the injection) for my daughter when she was around 9 and suddenly became a lot more needle-phobic than she had been previously. It was brilliant and eased a lot of trauma.

    If you ask me, your daughter is getting the message that mom really cares about her feelings, so that even while having shots is not negotiable, the way it is done, is done with consideration. No offense to doctors, but this falls into the arena of Mothering, not Doctoring ;) (in my not-so-humble opinion)

    Kay
     
  7. mischloss

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    I absolutely agree SweetKidMom!! I will do whatever it takes to get my son relief from daily shots. Thank goodness our endocrine is very supportive of any ideas that we have. Kids need to be kids, not having to worry about pain and shots every day of their lives. They have plenty of time when they get older to decide how they will administer their insulin, in the mean time, we are their GUARDIANS for a reason. : ) It's to have a better quality of life.
     
  8. mischloss

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    WendyC, Hi, my son takes Lantus at night also, and we just ordered the shot blocker. From what I am reading in your post, does it not work with the Lantus pen needles? We use Pen needles now for Humalog and Lantus. No syringes anymore (yeah!) was just wondering if you can let me (us) know that shot blocker is also successful with these. Thx!! : )
     
  9. Beach bum

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    Hi , I didn't realize the Lantus comes in a pen now. Wow, I wish we had that. Hopefully, we'll only be on it a few more weeks, as we are going on the pump. We were told that for my daughters age group (4) that the Lantus Pen wasn't working very well. I never pursued why as she took the syringe fairly well after switching to her hip for the injection site. Let me clarify, we are using the Novolog Pen, with the PenMate attachement. It hides the needle, but also isolates the injection site. It makes the injection go more smoothly. I'm thinking they discouraged us from the shot blocker because we were using a Penmate (NovoLog), and the two just may not work in unison. So, I don't know if the Lantus pen will work with the shot blocker. Hopefully it will!!)
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2005
  10. Melanie

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    Thanks for all the great opinions! It really helps and makes me feel much better! My daughter is also using Lantus at night and we do use the shot blocker. It works great for her!:)
     
  11. mischloss

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    Hi Wendy, yes, the nurses at the hospital gave us regular Lantus vials and syringes and when I asked them about pens they said it wasn't available, then for some strange reason, when we did our monthly nutritionist appt., I commented how great it would be if Lantus also came in pens since my son seems to like the Humalog pen so much and she told me that it is available and promptly wrote a prescription for it. The only different between the two pens is that the Humalog pens are disposable and the Lantus ones you order only the "click in" vials. But keep the mechanics of the pen. Just think of a fountain pen, where when the vial reservoir runs out, you pull it out and then pop in a new cartridge (cartrige by the way is the way that they refer to the Lantus vials for the pen!). Very neat. But my son at first did have a problem pushing down on the top button of the pen, after inserting the needle into this arm or leg. It is really meant for adult hands and his little hands couldn't hold the pen and push the button at the same time. But after a few trys, he seems to be doing it a lot better now. But he is 10. I don't think your daughter's hands would be big enough just yet to handle that bulky pen. Hope this helps!
     
  12. mischloss

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    Oh Wow, we got the shotblocker tonight and my son tried his leg with the Humalog pen! It went right in and he said he didn't feel a thing. This is truly a miracle. He even wants to do the Lantus shot tonight on the other thigh! THANK YOU ALL!!! I will definitely be ordering a second one to keep in my purse at all times!!!! Now he might not even need to be on the Insuflon so we will see!!! : )
     
  13. Red (aus)

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    Hi. My daughter doesn't use anything like this but I wanted to add that some doctors (and educators) advise against it because they are worried about reliance and what would happen if such a device wasn't available. This may not be a problem for many people but I have spoken to a parent who used an injectease for a few months, until one day they were out and were out longer than she had planned. This meant that they had dinner out and her daughter needed to have a shot and the injectease couldn't be found having been left at home. Their daughter flat out refused to take the shot without the injectease, having a huge tantrum where they were eating. They had to take her home to get the injectease before she would agree and unfortunately this was a fair distance from their home, meaning that everything was late and had repercussions for them over the following 24 or so hours while they got everything back on track. The have since weaned her off it altogether which was a long and arduous process.
    Other doctors will have various other reasons for not wanting to use it. Of course I'm not saying anyone should or shouldn't use any helpful devices, just clarifying one of the reasons some docs are anti. I still think that even if docs are anti something they should give their reasoning and allow the parent/patient to make their own decisions.
     
  14. mischloss

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    Hi Red, yes, I can totally understand and relate about this! My son at least has had 3+ months taking shots the old fashion way and knows what to expect regarding pain or discomfort. I am letting him know that this device is only an aid and that if we don't have it on hand one time, tough cookies...he still must take his shots. I do believe that children of course (and adults as well) get used to easier methods quickly and of course expect it all the time. I think if children at first don't have it and then are introduced to this shotblocker later on, it might be easier to go either way (with or without shotblocker) if necessary. Children that have had the shotblocker since day one of diagnosis and experience nothing without it, of course will be shocked when they have to take the shot "au naturel." I for one am grateful that there is a choice and that we can make the decision as a family. You are right though that doctors need to be more compassionate and explain their views regarding the shotblocker and educate the families on how to handle children's emotions regarding usage.
     
  15. mischloss

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    Just a quick update, we went for our checkup this morning and I told the nurse practitioner about the shotblocker, and she knew of it through her nursing seminars. They had some free sample ones that they were giving out. She told me that she thought it was a gimmick (from what she saw at the seminar) and hadn't taken it seriously. But hearing how great my son is doing on it, she has now written it down to order some for the doctor's office to have on hand. So I guess, good things will be coming out of this exchange of information. : )
     

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