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Secretly bolused 16.5 units over 2 hours today!!!

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by calebsmom1113, Jan 17, 2012.

  1. calebsmom1113

    calebsmom1113 Approved members

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    So Caleb has been going through a diabetes rebellion. We took him to a counselor, talked to him, sent him to diabetes camp, tried to do everything to make him more comfortable with it. At first he was sneaking a few snacks. We dealt with that then, no problem. Then he was saying he was checking his BG when he wasn't. Dealt with that. Today was it!!! He bolused 16.5 units between 5pm and 7:30pm because he claims he wanted apple pie. The crazy thing is we try to give him treats; we're not super-strict with him and he had asked us for it, we would have given it to him! We freaked! We didn't yell at him or make him feel bad, but we had a REAL talk with him about how dangerous that is. So now, he's off the pump, back on shots and DH and I are totally at a loss. When he was first diagnosed we were told that teens usually go through a rebellion around 13 or so. He just turned 10 and is starting puberty early, so I guess that's what's going on here. We're so afraid he'll be one of those stories we've all read about so many times before.
     
  2. MomofSweetOne

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    I'm so sorry you're dealing with this. Were you able to get enough carbs into him without a serious low happening? I hope you're able to find a top-notch counselor he'll respond to before something else happens. Diabetes is so hard, but this is beyond anything I've had to deal with. We'll be praying for your son and family.
     
  3. calebsmom1113

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    Thanks so much. We did get his numbers back up after loading him up on carbs. For the last 3 BG checks he was 102, 146 and 111. We gave him the Lantus and we're taking shifts staying up tonight checking him.
     
  4. Helenmomofsporty13yearold

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    That is one smart child you have there. I have not heard of that trick before. Quite brilliant really. To me that screams of him trying to have some control and not give diabetes or his parents the upper hand. Do they offer a social worker or Child Life Specialist at your clinic? DD has been going since diagnosis with the frequency changing as her need for it changes.

    Does he ever get the chance to hang out with friends he met at d-camp? Your local JDRF unit may have a mentoring program and may help you meet other families. Maybe even ask your pump rep to help you plan a social get together for some CWD's. It helps to have friends that understand.

    I just tried Googling to find a mentoring group in Florida and found this...
    http://diabetes.health.usf.edu/samfuldcamp/
    Wow, this looks amazing.
     
  5. mmgirls

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    No real advic but a question?

    Was the 16.5 units correct, I mean he wanted apple pie, was it a correct dose?

    I would start with how he came to the conclusion to dose the amount he did and the results of it.

    I mean if my 10yr old dosed the correct carbs for the appropriate timeing compareded to a blind guess and timing that was way off. I would come at it in a different way? KWIM

    Take what I say with a grain of salt, my dd can't add more than she has fingers and toes.

    I have, as a parent, bolused for "X" carbs before the food is even out, just knowing that te possibility is there to consume an extreme amount of carbs. SO I can totally see how a kiddo coud make a rash choice in the matter.
     
  6. MommaKat

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    Oh my, I am so sorry you're going through this. Wow. I'm not sure how'd I'd react - Freak, yes... but after that :confused: I'll be thinking of all of you tonight, and in the days ahead. I guess I'm with Helen, do you have a social worker or counselor at the endo, or close to you, that specializes in children with chronic illnesses? Dd's asked to see the social worker, and we have the name of one counselor who actually specializes in counseling for type 1 kiddos. (Just don't have funds to see her yet...)

    Having worked with kids, it really does sound like an attempt to gain control in what feels like an uncontrollable thing. Maybe you or a counselor can help him to achieve a better sense of control and work through some of the grief (though I'm not sure what that looks like). Many, many hugs!
     
  7. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I was wondering along the same lines - I mean, was there a pie? Did he help himself or did he bolus and use that Iob as leverage?

    I suppose there's always the risk of the attention seeking, "let me make myself go low" bolus but this sounds less like rebellion and more like a bit of confusion over how much to bolus for for a treat.

    Hope you all got some sleep last night!
     
  8. calebsmom1113

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    He didn't bolus the 16 at one time. He kept bolusing small doses every few minutes to keep himself low, then he'd check his BG, tell us he was still low (as if the carbs weren't bringing him up and it was a stubborn low) so then we'd have him eat more or drink juice, etc. He basically found a way to keep himself him low without us knowing why... until we checked the pump ourselves. We actually thought it was malfunctioning. It never occurred to us that we would think to do something like this. He has been going to a counselor and has gone to D camp for two years. I guess we'll try getting him together with other kids more.
     
  9. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Does you son know that you up-load the pump data every so often? Or that you can easily scroll through the history? ;) It good, I think, to remind them as they begin to become more independent, that while we may not be there for every bolus, that we can know about every bolus. ;)

    Personally I don't know that getting together with other D kids (in general) is such a cure all. Having him meet an older D kid who is managing life with Type 1 well and who isn't angry or overly resentful is one thing but just "other D kids" could well put him in the company of kids who are equally resentful and may well have "tricks" to share.:rolleyes:

    What does your son say about the incident? Can he explain what he was thinking?
     
  10. Lisa - Aidan's mom

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    Wow, scary. I really hope you can figure it all out.

    When my DS gets together with other D kids, they do not talk about or share D stories; they just play like usual. Maybe one on one couseling would be better. I wish there was a class that was geared just for kids; there are so many programs/seminars for Type 2's. Hopefully your local JDRF can give you some advice.
     
  11. Tigerlilly's mom

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    Sorry that you are having to deal with this:( I think that you were very smart going back to MDI....bolusing to stay low to keep eating is very dangerous and taking the abilility to do that away will keep your son safe.

    I have to agree with Sarah about getting together with d kids just because they have d...sure they will have diabetes in common, but that might be the only thing they have in common, and that will just give another reason for him to resent diabetes (being forced to hang with kids he has nothing in common with except diabetes)...my son could care less if somebody else has diabetes, it's like saying that kid has brown hair just like you...

    I think that speaking with a child life specialist at your endo's office is a great idea and hope they are able to guide you and your son.
     
  12. bnmom

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    So he was intentionally making himself go low and then later explained it by saying he wanted pie...yet he never asked for the pie, he just keep letting you randomly chase the lows?

    Wow, I can't imagine how frustrated and scared you must be. I think you absolutely did the right thing taking him off the pump. You guys have to take control of all things D until he works through whatever is making him act this way. Hopefully after some time living under an iron guard of food and dosages he'll tire of the lack of freedom and independence - and decide to start flying straight.

    I'd definitely have him back into the counselor asap. Time with other D kids may help him feel better, but you've already provided camp so it's not like he hasn't already seen that D is manageable and life goes on. I might lean toward the earlier suggestion of trying to find an older D kid as a role model. Especially a teen, since younger kids always think teens walk on water. ;)

    For now, big hugs to you!
     
  13. Lisa P.

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    My only advice is what I often give on threads like this and may not apply at all.

    Remember not to let diabetes get in the way of seeing other things. I believe kids sometimes use things like diabetes (even in their own heads) as a "cover" when other things are upsetting them. For example, if he feels out of control with peers, he might combat that by taking control of his pump -- it's the same impulse, I believe, as kids cutting themselves when they have anxiety (not saying it's the same thing, just saying kids cutting themselves is not about them liking pain or blood, it's about other stresses in their lives, but if you focus on the act itself it can distract you from the causes).

    Hope you get this sorted out soon.
     
  14. Connor's Mom

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    So very sorry you are going through this! My son is 10 as well and has used his D as a way to "get at me" if he is mad. Refusing to test if he is acting high or low, saying I hate him for giving him shots when he was MDI, sneaking food because I said no, not just to him but to all my kids, because I "can't tell him not to eat, I'll just go low.". It's very hard and scary. I can't say I have any magic advice...just keep at things and hopefully he will open up about what is underneath the D issue. Big HUGS!!!!!
     
  15. JaxDad

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    Very true; the underlying reason could be D-related or it could be something else entirely and that D is just the drum being beaten as a response to some other stress or to get your attention.

    10 years old is a prime age for kids to start to feel like "big kids" and to take control of their own lives, i.e. they now feel like they're deserving independence. So he might just be trying to assert his independence and maturity (I know, what he is doing isn't exactly mature - I didn't say it has to make sense).

    Earlier on you said he was sneaking snacks and it was dealt with, then he was not being truthful about BG checks, and that was also dealt with. If you don't mind my asking, how did you deal with the other issues? If the answer resulted in his not having the option to "screw up" it may have corrected the immediate symptom but didn't solve the problem by creating the solution he needed.

    Did you ask him why he did this "bolus trick" and what he was hoping to accomplish? You may not get an accurate answer - chances are you won't. My bet since he really didn't want pie is that he feels he is being pushed around and just wanted to make you "do laps" for a while because he could. The probable honest answer of "just to mess with you" he's smart enough not to say so he said came up with the pie excuse.

    I know this is long already but let me give you an example of something in my house - not D related. And that worked for us. DD was texting, watching TV, skyping and doing homework(HW) all at the same time. HW suffered. We talked about it and "threatened consequences" just like when she was younger and the carrot-stick routine worked. Next thing we know she's still missing HW assignments or getting poor grades on HW - not quizzes or tests. Sure we could have solved the problem by telling her she had to sit in the kitchen and have no distractions until he work was done. That would have "solved" the problem. But in reality it would not have. What she needed was to learn responsibility. So we sat her down, told her we were taking her phone away (just for shock value) then spontaneously "changed our mind" and explained that many parents would take the phone (many of her friends parents already do that) but that our job isn't to discipline her, its to teach her to be a responsible adult and removing the available distractions wouldn't teach her anything. So we told her that she needed to get her HW done and offered her time management skills "class" at home if she wanted. Of course she wanted nothing to do with that, but she learned to balance it all herself and she was obviously grateful for not just being allowed to keep her phone, but for being treated like a maturing individual.

    This may sound completely counter-intuitive, and you're certainly free to tell me to take a long hike but if it were my kid - I'd give him more freedom and responsibility. It may just be time to treat him more like an adult, and for me, that would start by having a very serious adult conversation about how he could have hurt himself, how he and you both have responsibilities and how you'll practice Diabetes Ronald Reagan Style - trust but verify.

    My opinion is given freely and worth just as much as you paid for it. ;)
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2012
  16. spamid

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    I am sorry you're dealing with this, we have also dealt with sneaking food and not checking and lying about it from my DD. My only concern would be on shots, could he not bolus himself, and you wouldn't have the record of the pump? Just curious...hope you can get him to tell you why he's doing this!
     
  17. Melissata

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    My daughter did something similar a few months back, so I understand how much it shakes you to your core. She is much older, but mentally about the same age. For her, it her trying to get a high blood sugar down after she ate an extra bowl of cereal, while staying at her brother's house. For some reason, when she "sneaks" extra food, she doesn't think to bolus for it. So, she started bolusing over and over again, and insisting that her brother take her home that she could work out on our eliptical machine. He called me after he realized what she had done and read me the history on her PDM. Since I was 5 hours away I was a wreck, but he managed to bring her up and keep her up without calling 911.
    I don't have the option of taking her off of the pump, unless I want to be with her 24/7, and I would do that if I had to. What I did was make a huge deal out of it, but not by punishing her, but by showing her how serious this could have been. I told everyone that she comes into contact with, and let her see my emotions about how awful this could have turned out. She seriously could have killed herself by wanting to be independent and fix it herself. He is the only one that we can leave her with, but now we can't even do that. I would worry myself sick unless I had him keep the PDM with him. We may have to do that because my brother is battling cancer and there may be another time that we have to go without her.
    It took me a long time to get over it, and I don't really have any solutions for you, but wanted to share that I get it. I didn't really believe in angels before, but I seriously believe that my mom was watching over her that day. I am pretty sure that she won't do this again, because I really have made her understand that the high wouldn't have killed her, but what she did really could have.
     
  18. calebsmom1113

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    Update:

    Thanks for all of your support. He really did want the pie and we had a long talk with him about the dangers of what he did. I'm pretty sure he was being honest and just thought he could outsmart us. He also admitted that he had done a "trial run" about a month ago on a smaller scale. That made it even worse.

    Anyway, we had him on MDI and the amounts of insulin were just not doing it. He was between 200-400 since then and over 600 last night! We finally just broke down and put the pump back on him and his numbers have been perfect all day. We'll just have to monitor him super-closely from now on.
     
  19. JaxDad

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    Thanks for the update.

    I'm glad I was wrong and that he wasn't just messing with you but really did want the pie after all.

    I'm doubly glad that you guys talked it all out and that you have him back on the pump and are doing well.
     
  20. Connor's Mom

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    So very glad he was honest with you and that he was able to go back on the pump!
     

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