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Scientific Sessions Update: Continuous Glucose Monitoring in the Youngest Patients

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Alex's Dad, Jun 27, 2011.

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  1. sammysmom

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    Lisa, we are just starting to get to this point and I will say it is a bit scary! Example, we had a horrible storm here last night and my son is deathly afraid of storms. He checked his BG after and said "I'm 442 but Im going to wait that number out, I think it will come down on his own"! He is learning what some of his triggers are and what to do in some situations. I thought we would NEVER get to this point, and while he is just in the beginning stages of this, it is a start. I will say, the cgm does help him with his decision making.
     
  2. Lisa P.

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    Wow.
    I really don't know why this kind of thing is really striking to me. I guess it just hits home that it's all going to "belong" to them some day. That's kind of a hard one.
    How right was he, out of curiosity? Did he have it pegged?
     
  3. joan

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    I think when people tell you when your child is diagnosed at a young age , " its good they got it early they know nothing different". I would wince when I heard this. It really bothered me.

    Now, I see that that it is true for him. Its common sense, habit, intuition to always think about what he is going to do before giving insulin. Maybe it is so important in his situation because he is an athlete and always was. Playing travel sports at a young age, 3 sports in HS and planning to play D1 lacrosse in college. Activity planned or done is hugely important in every dose.

    These decisions are just a part of life. No big deal. This is his control over d. Its summer here. The first time in a long time he has not had 2 to 3 hour practices every day. His dose are increasing and he has to figure out how much.

    He woke up the other day and went to the gym to work out. He was in the 80's. He ate a small bowl of cereal and went to work out. I said I think you need a unit or 2, he said I don't want to go low at the gym. He said this is an experiment and went. Came home 278. Now he knows and will use that info for the next time. Its no biggie at this point in his life.

    Don't worry about her when she is older. It all comes over time.
     
  4. Alex's Dad

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    Just because we don't use a CGM or a Pump doesn't mean I don't have and opinion on the subject, and that's why I started this thread, this is the technology I want for my daughter and for me the experience of the parents in this forum is very important, the newbies and the PROs like you.
    In the end your approach is the way to go, but I was pointing out that it might not be for everyone especially those with little kids.

    Lisa there was no derail in the thread you guys had a very good and informative discussion. thanks:)
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2011
  5. Darryl

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    By the teenage years, the judgement a kid makes in modifying the "formula" for certain applications comes naturally to them, just as when they learn to drive and figure out that they press the brake pedal a little harder, say, when stopping on a downhill vs. an uphill. They get a "feel" for it because they see the data all the time, and they learn the consequences of each decision. Leah does this kind of thing all the time... if her BG is a little high on a bike ride, she won't correct for it; if she's over 200 she knows that she needs to bump up the PDM's suggested bolus (she may not think in terms of how ISF is altered by hyperglycemia, but she knows it instincively based on experience). Many things become gut feel for them as they get to be teenagers.

    A lot of what Ali and Joan are talking about give a glimpse of what all of our kids will learn to do. Our kid's transition to self-management in adulthood will be accomplished, as with everything else that happens along the way.
     
  6. Darryl

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    I'm really sorry if my comment came across the wrong way... I was just trying to say that when a CGM is being used, a different set of ground rules and expectations can apply. I hope the discussion has been helpful.
     
  7. sammysmom

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    He was actually on the right track! He came down to 241 and I had to correct the rest. I took it as a teaching opportunity and told him that when he hits over 400, he typically does not come down all the way on his own. It's a work in progress but I have to say he is starting to own some of this!
     
  8. Flutterby

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    Interesting.. I think the constant attachment to a cgms, testing, counting carbs, constantly adjusting bgs and giving insulin (whether through a pump or injections) is more of a reminder than a dr. appointment every three months.. K actually likes going to her dr's appointments, she loves her CDE (and the endo, sometimes, lol).:cwds:
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2011

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