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[School] Remote Exam Proctoring and Accommodations

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by moco89, Jan 26, 2014.

  1. moco89

    moco89 Approved members

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    I am going to address this at the Know Your Rights-for College Students with Diabetes meeting, so the American Diabetes Association knows about this issue, on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 at 8 PM EST, but all of you should be aware of this accommodation issue that will likely occur to your children or current college student in the future with diabetes.

    As online courses and technology in general is becoming more common and prevalent, I just wanted to let all of you know that remote exam proctoring services, via webcam and the Internet, like ProctorU and Kryterion absolutely cause serious hardships for students with disabilities. This is a problem especially for those that use an insulin pump or continuous glucose monitor, which could alarm during the exam, which could lead to academic integrity allegations. These services do not let you take restroom breaks, let you have access to your medical devices, or let you have access to fluids or a source of glucose (sugar).

    Because these services, which are provided under contract between the testing service and the university, have no official policy (none of the services do--I have searched and searched) or statement for dealing with students with disabilities in regards to remote proctoring, I had to make alternative arrangements all on my own, that my university's disabilities office, my instructor, and the proctoring center had to agree upon. The disabilities office at my university actually had never encountered this sort of issue before, so this had to be brought to their committee, which took 2 weeks for them to accept my resolution for the matter. (This was not the university's fault. This should have been covered in the first place by the proctoring service. Other--in-person--proctoring services, such as Pearson VUE, accommodate students with disabilities and have official policies and statements. There is no reason why remote proctoring services should not have this covered.)

    Also, one of the exams is on a Sunday, so I have to drive 1.5 hours each way to (redacted) to a proctoring center that is a member of the National College Testing Association and is open on Sunday.

    I am very pleased with my univerisity (where I am pursuing an online degree, due to medical problems) and the proctoring center's willingness to work with me, but it is completely unacceptable that these services, even if bare-bones, do not have coverage or policies for students with disabilities.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2014
  2. moco89

    moco89 Approved members

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    I hope this is helpful.

    I also hope that none of you think I am being unreasonable. It does cause hardship, as I have to spend all day driving and taking an exam, which will last 8 hours total together. (I have a very fatiguing form of autoimmune autonomic neuropathy, which includes severe orthostatic hypotension--low blood pressure when standing up.) In addition, making proper arrangements, to ensure exam security, which satisfied the disabilities offices at my university and my instructor was not a simple task, and was entirely up to me to do.
     
  3. moco89

    moco89 Approved members

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    I am also going to call 1-800-DIABETES to get the American Diabetes Association in on this issue.

    Even if some of these commercial businesses (that do not directly receive federal funds) are bare-bones operations, they are legally obligated to accommodate (make arrangements for alternative testing) for students with disabilities.

    If mediation does not work and these companies are unwilling to form formal policies for students with disabilities regarding remote proctoring issues, I will report these commercial businesses to the US Department of Justice's, Civil Rights - Educational Opportunities Division, since ProctorU and Kryterion are private commercial businesses covered under Title III of the Americans with Disabilites Act.

    Keep in mind that this situation is different from school-related discrimination complaints. If your public or private school, university, or college receives federal funding--even a minimal amount of federal funding, of any sort, and you exhausted all appeals for accommodation related grievances--including their formal 504 grievance policy, you must file a complaint with the Department of Education's, Office of Civil Rights. This is covered under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

    I hope I can get this resolved, but I really do hope this helps someone.
     
  4. C6H12O6

    C6H12O6 Approved members

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    I think you are doing the right thing. Good work. I have a lot of experience writing exams with disability services with my school, and even had hiccups at that level. I cannot imagine having to deal with a third party company

    Good luck :)
     
  5. moco89

    moco89 Approved members

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    You make a great point that all arrangements can fall through with the exams, especially on a Sunday. Anyways, I do not feel like calling the American Diabetes Association, but I know that this is the right thing to do. It is a form of discrimination, since I cannot use their service, in any way, especially since this is provided under contract by the university involved. Let me make it clear that this was not my university's fault.

    I will be calling the ADA later today after I take care of some other obligations.

    After reading this, I am shocked that these companies do not have some sort of a statement, since they would have a legal counsel. This issue is very clear-cut, as seen below. (http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ817924.pdf):


    Legal issues, standards, and guidelines


    Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973 mandates that qualified
    people with disabilities in the United States have access to programs and services that
    receive federal funds. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) reinforced
    and extended the mandates of Section 504 and prohibits institutions from excluding
    and otherwise discriminating against people with disabilities in public programs and
    services,
    regardless of whether or not these programs and services are federally funded

    (Edmonds, 2004). In 1996, the US Department of Justice (Patrick, 1996, p. 1)
    clarified that ADA accessibility requirements apply to programs offered on the Inter-
    net by stating: ‘Covered entities that use the Internet for communications regarding
    their programs, goods, or services must be prepared to offer those communications
    through accessible means as well’.
    Specifically, if qualified individuals with disabilities
    enroll in distance learning courses offered via the Internet, these courses should be
    made accessible to them.
     

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