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School Policy to Shut Off Predicitive Alarms

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Lindy, Jan 26, 2010.

  1. Lindy

    Lindy Approved members

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    A MM Rep told our school staff of other school's in the state that have a policy that all pred. alarms need to be shut off. Could this be true?

    We shut off our High Pred. alarm - I would Hate it, if the MM Rep told a neighboring town and parent of Type 1 child that becaue WE do something, they should too.

    Some decisions should be the parents, and doctors decision - NOT the schools!

    Anyone else hear of such a thing?
     
  2. BrendaK

    BrendaK Neonatal Diabetes Registry

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    Wow, if that is true, that's just unbelievable! A CGMS requires a prescription from a doctor, schools are not allowed at all to make a medical decision like that!

    I can understand constant alarms being distracting, but there are "vibrate" features and "low" alarms on our Navigator.

    We don't use the high alarm, but we do use the predictave low alarm and it's saved him from many lows at school! The school should be THANKFUL for them, not ban them!
     
  3. Toni

    Toni Banned

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    I would fight that. The high predictive alarms should at least be able to go to vibrate; the low alarms should never be turned off at all.
     
  4. selketine

    selketine Approved members

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    I would ask that MM rep to give you more information - especially on how to find a written copy of this policy. I think the rep should provide you with this policy since the rep actually told YOUR school that other schools have it.

    That is ridiculous.

    We do turn off William's high alarm and predictive high alarm but we leave the low and predictive low alarm on - this is while at school. I can see how the high alarm going off every 10 mins or whatever would be VERY distracting - especially when there is too much IOB and you can't really do anything. But that is not something that should need a policy.

    Maybe a school had a huge problem with some parents who refused to turn off these high alarms but they continued to alarm all the time? I still don't think they can have a formal written policy to refuse to allow medical devices to alarm.

    I'm sure the ADA people would love to see that policy!
     
  5. deafmack

    deafmack Approved members

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    Well, for one thing policy is not law, so I am sure there is a way around this either via a 504 plan or through a Diabetes Medical Management Plan or by using the vibrate mode, etc.

    The thing is that there should always be exceptions to policies when needed, especially if the policy affects the childs health or safety.
     
  6. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

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    The MM needs to get you more info.
    Have your doc write something that you can put into the 504. Policy is not law, there are ways around this.

    Policy-
    NOUN

    1.
    course of action: a program of actions adopted by a person, group, or government, or the set of principles on which they are based

    Law-NOUN

    1.
    binding or enforceable rule: a rule of conduct or procedure recognized by a community as binding or enforceable by authority

    2.
    piece of legislation: an act passed by a legislature or similar body
     
  7. alismom

    alismom Approved members

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    Interesting topic, I have had teachers ask my daughter if she can turn off her alarms for exams....she told them no. I was also asked at the last 504 meeting if the alarms had to be on at all times. I told them that they didn't have to be, but we insist upon it.
     
  8. ecs1516

    ecs1516 Approved members

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    My son has them on vibrate so no one would know.;)
     
  9. Nancy in VA

    Nancy in VA Approved members

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    I don't agree with what or how the MM rep said, but I do think there is a balance that needs to be achieved. As much as our children have a right to be safe at school, other children have a right to an education as well and if that education is interrupted by beeping every 10 minutes, it can be disruptive. I think all of our requests for accomodations due to medical conditions need to be done with sensitivity to the affect on the people around our children.
     
  10. Lindy

    Lindy Approved members

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    Nancy - beeping every 10 minutes? Is that your experience?

    Our high pred. is off - our high sg is set at 1hr - so if it goes off, we test, correct and move on. If his number isn't below that high threshold, it'll go off again in 1hr and we see if another correction is needed. Most times, it works.

    Our low sg is at 20 minutes - you would get a low pred. alarm, treat - sometimes this is enough to prevent the low sg alarm, sometimes a low sg alarm will follow. However, you have another 20 minutes for glucose to raise above threshold so another alarm will not occur. If you get another alarm, it would be reason to see if he's still dropping and needs mroe carbs. It's pretty awesome!

    My frustration with the MM rep was in telling our school staff that another school district in our state has this "policy"... Our staff is very green and believing absorbing every word this rep has to say as if it's the LAW....

    We are 2.5yrs into the CGM, our school staff (brand new). So they are beginners, and having to go back to the very basics is a bit difficult. Staff is wanting to believe the reps over us - frustrating. The Rep was telling some story of an elderly gentleman who gained weight because he was feeding his pred. alarm - so they shut off his pred. alarm and just went with the low alarm and he lost his weight.. So now my child is being compared with an elderly man (Probably Type 2) - cause that makes sense!

    Teach the button pushing MM - keep your opinions to yourself!
     
  11. Toni

    Toni Banned

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    Beeping every ten minutes? How often would that occur? And if cgms did beep every ten minutes from repeated lows, child should either be in the nurse's office closely monitored for the quickly dropping blood sugar or aggressively treated with carbs but this is one situation where ignorance (via turning off predictive alarms) would not be bliss.

    Minimed Rep needs to stop pretending he is an endo. Some of the trainers for cgms are CDEs.
     
  12. hawkeyegirl

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    ROFL at the notion that other schools have a rule that predictive alarms have to be turned off at school. There are many, many reason why that is a pure fabrication:

    1. The Guardian, Dex and Nav have predictive alarms. The Paradigm does not.

    2. A TINY percentage of kids with diabetes use CGMs and of those, a fairly small percentage use a Guardian, Dex, or Nav.

    3. So you've got 1 in 300 kids with diabetes. It's probably an overestimation to say that 10% of kids with diabetes use a CGM. So in a school district you might have 1 in 3000 kids with a CGM.

    4. I bet no more than half of kids with a CGM have a Guardian, Dex or Nav (maybe less). So now you've got 1 in 6000 kids in a district with a CGM that actually has predictive alarms.

    5. I bet of those 1 in 6000 kids, many have turned off high alarms or high predictive alarms at school.

    6. The vast majority of school administrators would not know a predictive alarm from next Tuesday.

    7. So you've got a tiny, tiny number of students with the technology, and you've got schools who honestly have no concept of what the techology is, but schools have enacted policies against it? B freaking S. I'd ask to see copies of these "policies."

    ETA: We have our low set to re-alarm in 40 minutes and high set to realarm at 2 hours. If the school finds that disruptive, they can kiss my big fat behind.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2010
  13. Nancy in VA

    Nancy in VA Approved members

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    A Navigator DOES have predictive alarms. It actually had it BEFORE the Dex did.

    And yes, there are times when its every 10 minutes. If its a predictive followed by a low- if the low wavers right on the edge of the alarm barrier, it sometimes is even more frequent than that - remember that the Navigator takes a reading every minute instead of every 5.
     
  14. hawkeyegirl

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    Okay. My point remains the same. Most kids with CGM have a Paradigm, and that combined with the really small number of kids with CGMs means that this is hardly a pervasive issue where schools would be likely to enact policies. I will edit my post to accurately reflect the Nav's capabilities.

    I think the Navigator alarms differently than the MM, which is the system referenced in the OP's post. With the MM, you can choose the time period to mute the high and low alarms, and it will not re-alarm in that period even if BG is going back and forth above and below the threshold. It doesn't have anything to do with taking a reading every minute instead of every 5. The systems are just set up differently when it comes to muting alarms. We have our low mute set to 40 minutes, and it will not realarm during that time period at all.
     
  15. sammysmom

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    We keep Sam's cgm on vibrate. He likes it better that way. It draws less attention to him when it does alarm. Regardless, schools have no right to dictate policy about a medical device. Parents should also use good judgement and remember that the cgm could disturb other children and alarms and volume should be programed so that D care is not suffering but not so over the top that learning suffers because of distraction.
     
  16. Beach bum

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    He (or she) is totally out of line talking about this, and your school needs to realize, that while it may be policy, it's not the LAW. Ugh!

    Seems like he's made a big mess for you and you're the one stuck cleaning it up.
     
  17. sam1nat2

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    I agree:D They can put it on vibrate or shut it off for an exam. Its in our kids best interest to make sure that their bg is in range prior to an exam anyways, so why not shut it off for that time period?

    Do all the CGMS come with a vibrate option? I know Sam hates when he alarms in class, one reason he doesn't CGMS much.
     
  18. hawkeyegirl

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    At least with respect to the MM products, I could only WISH that the alarms were loud enough to disturb other students. I can't hear them when he's sitting right next to me sometimes! ;):rolleyes:
     
  19. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

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    We don't use vibrate, because Jack would simply ignore it, but I think the MM has a vibrate option for CGM alarms.
     
  20. sammysmom

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    Dexcom used to be louder too. Sam's will vibrate and then beep at him if he ignores the vibrate!!
     

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