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School nurse

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by njswede, Jun 18, 2015.

  1. njswede

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    My just told me that his school nurse finger-pricked him without disinfecting. She claimed that she didn't need to, since she used the same finger last time. I'm kind of baffled. I think I need to sit down and collect my thoughts before I write her an email...

    I mean, seriously? Apart from the infection risk, you're obviously not going to get a good result since there could be God knows what on his fingers. What's even worse was that it was after DS reporting that he felt low and the Dex was saying 81 and going down. The finger prick came out to 110. But what if he had touched a surface where someone's sugar cookie had rested a few minutes earlier...

    SERIOUSLY?????!!!!
     
  2. Christopher

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    If you poll parents on this site (and there is a thread somewhere that we all discussed this), you will find that we all have different views on disinfecting for bg checks and also for giving shots. Some people never do it, some use soap and water, others always use an alcohol pad. Personally, the times when I do check Danielle I always try and wipe her finger with a wet paper towel. As for the school nurse, calm yourself down before you send her anything. You need to maintain a good working relationship with her. And you also need to pick your battles. I still think you need to say something to her to set the standard of care that you expect her to give your son, I am just saying the WAY you deliver the message is important. Good luck.
     
  3. jenm999

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    Our team feels that disinfecting is not necessary but that washing with soap and water is. Alcohol will not remove sugar residue.
     
  4. KatieSue

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    Mine never does anything first (she's 19) and licks the extra blood off after. It's gross but she's never had any sort of infection.
     
  5. Theo's dad Joe

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    At the barbara davis center they told me soap and water and only to remove impurities to get an accurate test. Bernstein says no disinfection and that he's never seen a patient get an infection from a finger stick FWIW.

    By the way, my kids team at barbara davis center were adamant that they not prep the insulin the day before. The nurse was placing the needle the day before and capping it for the next day.
     
  6. wilf

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    You will not get a better number from disinfecting (e.g.. with an alcohol swab), and the infection risk is so low as to be non-existent. If you want to make sure that the numbers are correct, a thorough hand wash with soap and water is what you. This is something your 7 year-old can do.

    I would leave this, so that the nurse listens when you have a real issue.. :cwds:
     
  7. susanlindstrom16

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    Yeah, I agree that if he was reporting feeling low she should have had him rinse his hands off at least. I also don't get the logic of "it was the same finger as last time" I would mention it to her but in a casual way.
     
  8. rgcainmd

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    This. Big time.
     
  9. rgcainmd

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    If Dr. Bernstein says so, It must be true. :rolleyes: <--- roll eyes, not a happy face

    (Kinda makes me want to start using alcohol wipes. Maybe even betadine scrub. With a steel brush....)
     
  10. swellman

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    We never, ever, ever disinfect before testing in all our years. He washes his hands if he feels it necessary. We have never had one problem.

    An alcohol swab might not be the best way to remove residual sugar. Washing is.

    Also, FWIW, we always swab the insulin vial and scrub and injection, Dexcom and Omnipod site. Not one infection.

    YMMV
     
  11. njswede

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    Wow! That didn't take the turn I expected. :) Anyway, I talked to the nurse and we're good.
     
  12. swellman

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    Every single person here played by a different playbook when first diagnosed.
     
  13. BarbDwyer

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    Lol. I'm glad it all got worked out. My kid never washes his hands first. I make him wash and retest before treating a very high number. He reuses needles until they bend or hurt like hell. I change them out each time if I am home but I'm not always home or he is away. Kids are gross - nurses should go by the book though!
     
  14. rgcainmd

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    For better or worse, this pretty much sums it up for how we handle things.
     
  15. Mimikins

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    I should go ahead and take the walk of shame -I'm a nursing student and don't sterilize my finger for every single test. If my result is abnormally high and has me questioning its accuracy, then I'll wash my hands and test again. I'm also guilty of licking the blood off my finger. For site changes, I'm pickier about making sure everything is sterile (rubbing my new site with alcohol, rubbing the insulin vial with alcohol, making sure my hands are washed, etc). The chances of infection are a lot higher for what is, essentially, a wound that is open for three days than one that's only open for maybe five minutes.
     
  16. sszyszkiewicz

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    I think there is a big difference between "sterilizing" and "clean". We generally avoid alcohol on the fingers because it dries them out. Just to keep things on the up and up with Dex calibrations it has been more than sufficient to simply make sure the finger is clean. A quick wipe with a washrag, A quick wash and dry. In fact if i am reaching into those little bottles to try and coax a strip out I make sure MY hands are clean. That may be a bit over the top but I get the feeling these strips are a little sensitive.
     
  17. mikegl31

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    Very rarely do we clean his fingers. Only if we get a high number and want to retest.
     
  18. Beach bum

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    In a perfect world, my daughters wash their hands. So this happens maybe 20% of the time. Gross? Yes. Dangerous? No. But at least they know that if the meter shows 350, then they need to definitely wash with soap and water. I am a bit surprised a nurse didn't encourage hand washing, but at least you settled this issue in a friendly manner.
     
  19. wilf

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    A lot of truth in this.. :cwds:
     
  20. Charliesmom

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    We use wipes only when we've been at a park or something and his hands are dirty with no place to wash them. I prefer that he washes his hands before testing to make sure we don't get an inaccurate number and, honestly, it's another chance to get the kid to wash up.
     

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