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School dance

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by njswede, May 19, 2015.

  1. njswede

    njswede Approved members

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    The twins' school is hosting a school dance for the second graders. I asked if there would be a nurse on staff to help my son if needed and they looked at me as if I had two heads. Correct me if I'm wrong, but if something is organized by the school and on school premises, they are required by law to make reasonable accommodations for children with disabilities, which would include diabetes care, aren't they?

    We'll probably just end up volunteering to chaperon the thing, which is no big deal, but I'm a little concerned that the school doesn't seem to understand the law they're operating under.
     
  2. Lakeman

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    I am pretty sure you are right. I bet one of the experts here will let us know. After you volunteer ( to show how serious you are and to demonstrate that you are a team player) you could clarify the issue with them and even add an addendum to your 504 or IEP so they can't forget.
     
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Yes, school should have a nurse on site for all school sanctioned activities but it doesn't always happen. That said, for social events I would just volunteer or be handy because I didn't want the nurse hovering or interfering with DD's occasion.
     
  4. njswede

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    Exactly my thinking as well. I don't need a nurse hovering over him at his first school dance. We'll probably end up chaperoning, but even if we didn't, he has a Dexcom, feels his lows and knows how to treat them, so he would be fine even without it. The school is two minutes down the road from our house. But, since this is the first time, we'll be there with him.

    By the way, a somewhat related question: Last year, our son was struggling with his literacy and was evaluated and found eligible for special ed. That automatically gave him an IEP. Since then, he's pretty much caught up on his reading, but the IEP is still valid for three years (I think). The school told us that since he's already on an IEP, there was no need to go through the 504 process for his D. So far, it's been fine, but I'm a bit worried that since the IEP isn't specifically for his T1D, we'd be out of luck if there's ever a situation where we'd have to play hardball. Any experience or input?
     
  5. glko

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    Just because the school is required by law to have a nurse present doesn't mean that is what is best for your child or what you may even want. If it is a short event and we are able to be there I would prefer to have myself or DH volunteer. The nurse will likely not be the one who knows your child and even if they do they won't handle things the way you do. Too much interfering could ruin the experience for your child and too little may result in wonky blood sugars anyway. Being present as a parent chaperon will not make your child stand out and will allow him/her to enjoy the experience vs worrying about the nurse in the corner.
     
  6. jenm999

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    Apples and oranges. Get a 504. An IEP wouldn't specify, for instance, that he may need a snack after recess to head off a low, or should be excused for class to visit the nurse at any time he's symptomatic (and escorted when low), or that he is allowed to carry a cell phone for remote BG readings where most schools forbid cell phones. It's not even a process, really, or at least wasn't for us in Massachusetts; just one meeting with teacher, nurse, and social worker (with principal sign off) to discuss what accommodations his condition requires and to put it in writing so everyone is on the same page. Happy to email you a copy of ours if you would like.
     
  7. njswede

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    Thanks! That's exactly what I thought. Now, that being said, our school has been wonderful and extremely accommodating and we've worked out everything informally. All the teachers and the nurse are on board and it's been smooth sailing so far, so I haven't seen it as a priority to get the 504 sorted. I probably should, though, in case we hit a bump somewhere that needs to be addressed more formally.

    The only incident was DS using his iPhone to take pictures of girls (hmmmm... :) ), which resulted in an email from the teacher asking us to give DS a primer in appropriate cellphone use.
     
  8. rgcainmd

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    Wow, a school dance for second-graders?!? And we wonder why our kids "grow up too fast"...

    My daughter is in 7th grade, and she would simply die if I chaperoned at a school dance (even though all her friends think I'm the coolest parent around). I'm pretty sure I felt the same way when I was in 7th grade (my parents, however, were decidedly not cool). Thanks to Dexcom Share with bluetooth, I'm no longer uncomfortable about my daughter attending dances (I'm not overly worried about T1D stuff, that is...the groping and making out stuff is another matter entirely).
     
  9. Megnyc

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    I was going to post that I had never heard of a nurse in the public school district I attended in the building after 3 PM regardless of after school activities but I just asked a former coworker of mine who is a school nurse in NYC and apparently they will hire a nurse for school sponsored activities even in the evening. However, you get whichever nurse decides to take the job for the extra hours. The only information they get before accepting and showing up would be something like "Daily diabetic care; PRN glucagon." I think I personally would rather a trained chaperone than a random nurse the kid had never met before. This is for all NYC public schools that use school nurses from the office of school health.
     
  10. virgo39

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    While I believe the school is required by law to make reasonable accommodations, it may be a bit of an overstatement to say that they are required by law to provide a nurse. Of course, it may be the practice of a number of districts to use nurses.
     
  11. mmgirls

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    An IEP is a stronger document with more people involved. Most schools will not do an 504 in addition to an IEP, T1D accomidations should be written into the IEP and then reference to a medical care plan for T1D.
     
  12. BarbDwyer

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    I second this post :)

    You can write the IEP to include whatever support you deem appropriate for school functions. Personally I'd rather have a chaperon trained to my child's specific needs over a random nurse hired for the event. At his grade level I'm guessing there are a number of people in the school trained? His teacher will probably be there. Is she trained?
     
  13. mmgirls

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    I have always been a chaprone to my kids field trip or after school activities, yet we moved this last month 2600 miles across the US and when we arrived here was a field trip for my oldest within the month. I had to sit on my hands and make sure there would be someone to be with her. I got my approval in time but prepared for the " if I csn't " go.

    I am in new territory here having a school nurse that is absolutely on top of daily / weekly/ schedualed or un- schedualed events and extra treats and snacks.

    In the past "I " felt like I was the ringmaster, and now I am a happy watcher of the show.

    You have to decide where you land in support from the school, no matter the laws that "cover" your child. If you are willing and able, and your child is welcoming, I see no issue with a parent being a main support in the school system. But, also if a family member can not be available to give support then the school system has to.

    That may or may not be an easy task.
     

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