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Recipes

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by meghanmurray, Sep 11, 2011.

  1. meghanmurray

    meghanmurray New Member

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    Hello! A friend of mine just recieved the news last night that her 2 year old son has type 1 diabetes. I would really like to organize a group to take meals to them for the next several weeks, as I am sure one of the most overwhelming aspects of coming home is facing the diet change and figuring out how to implement it. Would any of you be willing to share some recipes with me that I can spread out amongst our friends? Thank you so much for your help in advance!
     
  2. frizzyrazzy

    frizzyrazzy Approved members

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    What a great friend you are to want to help. :)

    But actually, the thing is, with type 1 diabetes our kids don't really change the way they eat. We simply have to know the carbohydrate count in the foods they eat and then give them the appropriate insulin.

    Soooo.. bake whatever you want, (including some "glad you're home from the hospital" cupcakes with oodles of frosting) make casseroles etc, just copy the nutrition information from the recipe. THAT right there is a huge help. If you have a printed recipe and it says "serving size 1 12" square has 22g of carbohydrates" THAT is the info you want to provide. If you don't have a printed recipe try running it through an online recipe builder, or getting a close approximation from a website like Calorie king.com

    You're right - it's a huge adjustment but just not in the ways you're thinking.
     
  3. Flutterby

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    great friend! I 'ditto' what Frizzy said.. make whatever they like, maybe make the child's favorite food, cookies, casserols.. whatever they like.. and include the serving size and carb count.. great place on the internet to look is calorie king.com.. you can type in the food type and serving size and it'll give you the carbs count.

    The first thing most everyone is told when a child is dx with type 1, is that they are a kid first, if they could have it before, they can have it now, the carbs need to be counted and insulin given for it. Type 1 isn't treated the same way it was years ago 'sugar' is no longer a 'no no'.. I bet your friend will apperciate you all very much! :cwds:
     
  4. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

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    Whatever you make, include very specific carb counts, detailed as to exactly how much a serving is. For example, include a card with basic ingredients and 1 cup = 20 carbs. Avoid things that are pasta based right now, and I would also personally avoid potatoes, those two things tend to be troublesome for some kids. Definitely NO pizza.

    A neat gift would be to include a serving ladle that is exactly 1/2 cup. That's one of my favorite kitchen utensils, I have a few ladles that are precisely half a cup serving size and that's how my son scoops up his food. I have another that's 1/4 cup. Be sure to measure it and let her know how much one ladle serves.

    You're a great friend! My friends offered and I said NO WAY because I didn't want them to have to do the carb counting, it's kind of a crazy thing to learn to do and quite frankly I didn't trust anyone to do it at that point, I mean, what if they were WRONG. So whomever cooks, let them know that the carb amounts are very very important and they should be meticulous with it.
     
  5. bnmom

    bnmom Approved members

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    That is such a nice thing to do! No doubt this poor gal would welcome some help, her world has been rocked. You are a good friend.

    I agree with everyone - make whatever meal you want, nothing is off limits for that little boy. As you put a meal together, look at the package for each ingredient and make a note of how many Total Carbohydrates you are putting in (Total Carbohydrates and the corresponding serving size are on the nutritional label).

    Then at the end, just add up all the ingredient counts you noted...divide it by the number of servings your finished meal provides - and that gives you the carb count per serving. Then just hand the whole note sheet to your friend with the meal.

    Your friend will probably want to kiss you full on the lips when you show up with a ready to go meal that gives her all the info she needs to calculate for her son! I know I would have ;)
     
  6. emm142

    emm142 Approved members

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    You sound like a great friend! :)

    I think the best plan is to talk to your friend and find out:

    1. Are there any dietary restrictions right now from a diabetes standpoint? Nowadays, most kids with diabetes can eat what they want, but some are on different treatment plans which may necessitate different methods.

    2. Is he on a fixed number of carbohydrates per meal?

    If the answer to both of those questions is no, then you can make whatever but be careful about counting the carbohydrates. If the answer is yes, then you may need to tailor the food to the number of carbohydrates he can eat in a meal. Some people are on fixed carbohydrate intake at first.
     
  7. Deal

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    The number 1 thing a friend could do would be to offer to learn the care protocols so they could offer a safe house of sorts in case the parents need the occasional break. That would be worth a thousand meals!
     
  8. swimmom

    swimmom Approved members

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    And please tell her about this forum!
     
  9. L101418

    L101418 Approved members

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    After our dx a wonderful neighbor brought a bunch of these chicken bundles http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,1739,158181-230197,00.html over. She delivered them frozen so I could just put a few in the fridge to thaw and pop them in the oven for 20-25 min. My picky girls would not eat them but they were a blessing for me at a time I was emotionally, mentally and physically overwhelmed and not really eating. Not the healthiest but warm and comforting in my tummy.
     
  10. Christopher

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    Do you have a child with diabetes?

    Honestly, I think it would be worse getting all these homemade food items. For most people, there does not need to be a major change in their diet. The challenege is learning how to count carbs and match up the insulin to those carbs. The best thing you can do for your friend is direct them to this site and let the people here try and answer any questions they may have.
     
  11. swimmom

    swimmom Approved members

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    I totally disagree. When I've had a child in the hospital or other stressful family event, a meal provided by friends feels like a getting a big hug. Even though they can't do anything to fix the situation, they want you to know that they care and will do whatever they can do to help you. It means a lot. Taking on the burden of shopping, planning and preparing a meal is very welcome practical help during a difficult time.
     
  12. Christopher

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    Understood. And I would normally agree, except in this case the issue IS the food.
     
  13. virgo39

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    I think it is great that you want to help your friend. If you have any concerns about bringing her food -- I'd suggest you just ask her.

    When we first brought DD home from the hospital, we did not need to be on a restricted diet, but as the pps have said, we did need to count carbs.

    My niece made us some soup and included a carb count per cup on a label on the container -- she got it by entering the recipe into an online website (there are many -- some recipe sites, some weight watching type sites, etc.), sparkpeople, to come up with the carb count.

    DD's aunt baked chocolate chip cookies and took special pains to make them each the same size and to provide a carb count per cookie (she also baked them with Splenda, after asking me if we would be interested in that -- I was so that DD could have a treat like that as a snack without extra insulin).

    My nephew brought me a couple copies of the Calorie King guide, including a large print one that stays in our kitchen!
     
  14. swellman

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    I tend to agree - I thought back to when we were first diagnosed and I'm certain if someone brought over home prepared food I think we would have had a brain implosion. Even with the best intentions it's pretty difficult for someone to estimate serving size and carbs for prepared meals. I, personally, would not want to introduce a variable of that size into the equation early on. I would now, having a few years' experience, ask first now that I think I can deliver a meal with very accurate carb estimation but we could hesitant just in case something went awry as it usually does early on.
     
  15. cdninct

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    @Christopher: Is there a reason why you are asking? There is nothing in her post to suggest she does. She is just looking for a way to help a friend out, which is really admirable. Maybe you were asking for a totally different reason, but it looked to me like you were telling her to get out.

    Having said that, I totally agree with the rest of what you said. I was terrified to serve anything that didn't come with a store-issued nutritional label all but crazy glued to it (and preferably pre-packaged in individual serving sizes, too!).

    @meghanmurray: thank you for trying to help out a friend. I wish I had had somebody like you thinking of ways to help me out when my son was diagnosed. Like everyone has said, her child will probably be able to eat the same foods as before, but food is a touchy subject in the first few weeks/months after diagnosis. You might want to run your plan by your friend and see if the thought of other people's homemade meals fills her with delight or dread! There may, perhaps, be some other gesture that she would find more helpful. Good luck (to you, her, and her child)!
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2011
  16. StillMamamia

    StillMamamia Approved members

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    That's really nice of you.:)

    I would, if I may suggest, take it slow at first with the helping bit. A simple "Hey, I'm here for you. Let me know how I can help." will probably be more helpful for now. Volunteering (like someone else said) to babysit, after being fully trained on what to do (if you want to, of course!), or just calling to see how the family is doing. Stuff like that. Like you're there without being too forceful.:cwds:

    There will be a time for adjustment. There will be times when she feels she can't leave the house or trust anyone enough to take care of her child. Try to reassure her the time will come when she's ready. It will come. Meanwhile, you can ask questions here and we'll answer them to the best of our ability.

    If you still want to make meals, I think just bring something you know the family likes and that's it. Like Frizzyrazzy (almost wrote Fuzzyrazzy!:eek:) said normal food with carb counts is the way to go.

    Good luck and keep us posted!
     
  17. 5kids4me

    5kids4me Approved members

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    Whatever you do, please do NOT show up with a bunch of diabetic sugar free stuff. Maybe a deli tray or something of the sort would be a nice gesture. More than anything educate yourself so you can help your friend along the way... it is going to be a hard journey.

    Most of my friends vanished. I really admire your effort to help out:)
     
  18. danielsmom

    danielsmom Approved members

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    Well find out where the child likes to eat.....print out their nutrition menus....if he likes fast food drive through and pick up their nutrition menus they have available....Calorie King Book has been a life save for me....thats the best gift to give early on......Your great to help out...wish everyone was like that!
     
  19. Christopher

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    Absolutely not. It is not my place to tell people to "get out" of this site. It was just a simple question.
     
  20. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    When Maddie was 2 she had a very limited range of foods that she would eat, chances are in this case the food will really be more for the rest of the family than the D child so the whole question, imho, is moot. BUT if a friend wants to step up and support a newly dx'd family then I'm all for it and I encourage you to listen and learn and become an adult the parents can count on to help care for their child. Best of luck. :cwds:
     

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