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Reading anything good???

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by Sarah Maddie's Mom, Sep 22, 2010.

  1. VinceysMom

    VinceysMom Approved members

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    And i am currently reading, "And then there were none" and Agatha Christy read... My son has to read it in school so I thought I'd read it too... He has his book, I have mine! this way I can help him with homework, etc...lol After the first pages, it finally started to pick up!
     
  2. Diana

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    Oh, I just started this today. I'm so glad it is good!!
     
  3. Tricia22

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    About 100 pages into Tami Hoag's newest, Secrets to the Grave.
    I love medical mysteries and forensic stuff... I'm a science nerd!
    So far, this one's really kind of chilling, but very good.
     
  4. Yellow Tulip

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    I'm about 300 pages into the "Fall of Giants" by Ken Follett. It's a good story, but so far not a page turner like his other books. But I do have over 600 pages left so who knows!
     
  5. Wendy12571

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    I also LOVED A dog's purpose. If you are an animal lover. Oogy, is another great one and so is Katie up and down the hall. I loved the first book in Evan's new series The Walk. The Help was an awesome book. I also adored The Hunger games trilogy. I will let you know when I finish my large backlog of books.
    Wendy
     
  6. Beach bum

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    The Glass Castle by Jeanette Walls.
    It was incredible.
     
  7. Yellow Tulip

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    Wasn't it? I could not believe some of the parts. It's amazing there are people like that out there.
     
  8. Marcia

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    If you liked The Glass Castle, you will like Broken Horses, based on Walls' grandmother.

    ETA- The title is Half Broke Horses
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2011
  9. onthego

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    My sister recommended The Heart Mender by Andy Andrews to me... haven't read it yet but it's next on my list.
     
  10. Ed2009

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    For entertainment purposes, you can't go wrong with the following books. Not masterpieces, but readable, amusing, gripping, and entertaining.

    In order of my preference:

    Impact (Douglas Preston): Nice almost SciFi (no flying saucers, but some out of this world elements), nicely put together, the right amount of everything. The best of the 3.

    The Altman Code: A classic Robert Ludlum, with the usual interesting twists. Good luck helps the main character quite a bit, but well, the fate of the world always depends on the flip of a coin together with the undercover agent stunts.

    Dead Even (Brad Meltzer): Good thriller. The plot is a bit stretched-out (you might hear yourself say "Awww, com'on!"), but who cares.
     
  11. Beach bum

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    Oooh! Thanks. I'll pass that info onto my book club.
     
  12. Marcia

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    Sorry! The title is Half Broke Horses. (Don't take pain pills and try to write anything that makes sense!)
     
  13. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Edith Wharton's "The House of Mirth", really enjoying it.
     
  14. sooz

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    I just finished reading this book, and I can tell you, if you read it, you will never think about WWII in the same way. Men who were my father's generation..perhaps your grandfathers? and what they endured to give us the life we take for granted. We think of our children as heroes, and they are..and we think of all they endure, and they do..but this is a story for inspiraton and survival and resilience that I hope is never repeated. The human spirit is amazing...and this is a TRUE STORY, that is what makes it even more amazing...a guy's book, a woman's book..a family's book..a book about humanity. I have always read fiction, but the last two books I have read are non fiction and I really got so much from them.
     
  15. mandapanda1980

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    I am a big suspense/thriller fan. I love Ted Dekker. He's a christian author so his stories have a good moral story too. Just finished Immanuel's Veins and am now about 100 pages into Burn. A favorite of mine since it was a requirement in 7th grade is They Cage the Animals at night by Jennings Michael Birch. True story of his life going through orphanages and foster homes. Great book but be prepared to cry
     
  16. Illinifan

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    +1 on Ted Dekker. Big fan of his stuff.
     
  17. Lakeman

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    I get books at the library weekly.

    Yet I still do most of my reading online. My most recent find was Imprimus, which is a collection of speeches that I find interesting.

    Here is one paragraph from one speech (actually in this case an interview) on one topic:

    "LA: You don't think the Smoot-Hawley tariff caused the Depression?

    MF: No. I think the Smoot-Hawley tariff was a bad law. I think it did harm. But the Smoot-Hawley tariff by itself would not have made one quarter of the labor force unemployed. However, reducing the quantity of money by one third did make a quarter of the labor force unemployed. When I graduated from undergraduate college in 1932, I was baffled by the fact that there were idle machines and idle men and you couldn't get them together. Those men wanted to cooperate; they wanted to work; they wanted to produce what they wore; and they wanted to produce the food they ate. Yet something had gone wrong: The government was mismanaging the money supply. "

    http://www.hillsdale.edu/news/imprimis/archive/issue.asp?year=2006&month=07
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2011

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