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Reading anything good???

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by Sarah Maddie's Mom, Sep 22, 2010.

  1. kiwikid

    kiwikid Approved members

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    I just finished "Leaving the World" by Douglas Kennedy - not my usual sort of book but I enjoyed it.
     
  2. TheFormerLantusFiend

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  3. Mom2rh

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    Yeah I can totally see RDJ as a drunk and cranky Haymitch!
     
  4. Liongirl4

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    I just finished Cutting For Stone and loved it..thanks to those who recommended it! Also read The Hunger Games..My daughters have read the three of them, and I am half way through the second..great reading!! I am glad I ordered all 3 of them at the same time.
    Samantha has just started Middlesex..
    Thanks again for the great suggestions.
     
  5. Charliesmom

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    I read a book called 'Geist' by Philippa Ballantine. It was really, really good. I had a hard time getting into the first couple chapters and then couldn't put it down. I can't wait until the next book comes out
     
  6. sooz

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    Has anyone mentioned/read The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot? I am in the middle of it now. It is a work of non fiction that took the author 10 years to research and it is her first book. It is a fascinating look at the beginning of cell reseach and the poor black woman who died from cervical cancer in the early 1950's whose cells have been reproduced by the trillions for medical research without her consent or knowledge and about her family. Her cells were used, among other things, to find the vaccine that erradicated polio! Her cells are still being used today for all kinds of research. It is a book both about science, medical ethics, poverty in rural America, medical arrogance, and human tragedy. I really think it is a book like no other and the writing is first rate.

    http://www.amazon.com/Immortal-Life...WVU5XWC2&s=digital-text&qid=1294377926&sr=1-1
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2011
  7. sooz

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    Here is a review on Amazon of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks:

    QUOTE:

    Honestly, I can't imagine a better tale.

    A detective story that's at once mythically large and painfully intimate.

    Just the simple facts are hard to believe: that in 1951, a poor black woman named Henrietta Lacks dies of cervical cancer, but pieces of the tumor that killed her--taken without her knowledge or consent--live on, first in one lab, then in hundreds, then thousands, then in giant factories churning out polio vaccines, then aboard rocket ships launched into space. The cells from this one tumor would spawn a multi-billion dollar industry and become a foundation of modern science--leading to breakthroughs in gene mapping, cloning and fertility and helping to discover how viruses work and how cancer develops (among a million other things). All of which is to say: the science end of this story is enough to blow one's mind right out of one's face.

    But what's truly remarkable about Rebecca Skloot's book is that we also get the rest of the story, the part that could have easily remained hidden had she not spent ten years unearthing it: Who was Henrietta Lacks? How did she live? How she did die? Did her family know that she'd become, in some sense, immortal, and how did that affect them? These are crucial questions, because science should never forget the people who gave it life. And so, what unfolds is not only a reporting tour de force but also a very entertaining account of Henrietta, her ancestors, her cells and the scientists who grew them.

    The book ultimately channels its journey of discovery though Henrietta's youngest daughter, Deborah, who never knew her mother, and who dreamt of one day being a scientist.

    As Deborah Lacks and Skloot search for answers, we're bounced effortlessly from the tiny tobacco-farming Virginia hamlet of Henrietta's childhood to modern-day Baltimore, where Henrietta's family remains. Along the way, a series of unforgettable juxtapositions: cell culturing bumps into faith healings, cutting edge medicine collides with the dark truth that Henrietta's family can't afford the health insurance to care for diseases their mother's cells have helped to cure.

    Rebecca Skloot tells the story with great sensitivity, urgency and, in the end, damn fine writing. I highly recommend this book. --Jad Abumrad
     
  8. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    It's on my nightstand now ... waiting for me to finish, "Where the God of Love Hangs Out" by Amy Bloom http://www.amazon.com/Where-God-Lov...=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1294379660&sr=1-1 which is a complex and moving pairing of two novellas. It's breaking my heart, but a book I'll read again.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2011
  9. MissEmi

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    I just read Beguiled by Deeanne Gist and J. Mark Bertrand. Very, very good! I was sucked in from the very beginning! The mystery had be completely baffled until the end.

    If any of you are into history at all, Julie Klassen's books are absolutely riveting. Her books show a side of the Regency era that is fascinating; wayyy different than anything I've ever read, or learned in history class. She really goes beyond the surface to show what life was really like, for the rich and poor alike.
     
  10. sooz

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    Another book that I read quite a while ago, but is now out on Kindle for only $5.69 is The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time: A Novel by Mark Haddon. The hero is autistic. If you haven't read it yet, you might want to look into it, I really enjoyed it. Here is a review from Amazon:

    http://www.amazon.com/Curious-Incid...WVU5XWC2&s=digital-text&qid=1294379625&sr=1-1

    QUOTE:

    Mark Haddon's bitterly funny debut novel, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, is a murder mystery of sorts--one told by an autistic version of Adrian Mole. Fifteen-year-old Christopher John Francis Boone is mathematically gifted and socially hopeless, raised in a working-class home by parents who can barely cope with their child's quirks. He takes everything that he sees (or is told) at face value, and is unable to sort out the strange behavior of his elders and peers.
    Late one night, Christopher comes across his neighbor's poodle, Wellington, impaled on a garden fork. Wellington's owner finds him cradling her dead dog in his arms, and has him arrested. After spending a night in jail, Christopher resolves--against the objection of his father and neighbors--to discover just who has murdered Wellington. He is encouraged by Siobhan, a social worker at his school, to write a book about his investigations, and the result--quirkily illustrated, with each chapter given its own prime number--is The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time.


    Haddon's novel is a startling performance. This is the sort of book that could turn condescending, or exploitative, or overly sentimental, or grossly tasteless very easily, but Haddon navigates those dangers with a sureness of touch that is extremely rare among first-time novelists. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is original, clever, and genuinely moving: this one is a must-read. --Jack Illingworth, Amazon.ca
     
  11. nanhsot

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    I know this is an old thread, but since someone else revived it, I have to throw in my favorite new book: "The Dog's Purpose". Animals lovers MUST read this, it is written from the viewpoint of the dog and it is both a hilarious and a bittersweet look at how our beloved animals view us and the world. By the end you look at your animals through a different light. Loved this book!
     
  12. Mody_Jess_Pony

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    http://www.amazon.ca/Book-Thief-Markus-Zusak/dp/0375842209
    THE BOOK THIEF IS AMAZING!!!! I HIGHLY RECOMMEND IT!
    It's from a German girls perspective and death is the narrator(which is not as morbid as it sounds) it's about WW2 and the Nazi Reign and it shows how it effected the German populace and this girls life, and also about the Jewish boy she falls in love with/becomes friends with

    and the http://www.houseofnightseries.com/
    house of night series is AMAZING
    BUT
    ANITA SHREVE is better then Jodi Picault or whatever her name is
    http://www.anitashreve.com/
    I reccomend every single book except I didn't really like 'the weight of water'
    Fortunes Rocks is my FAVE OF her books
     
  13. shekov

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    This is a great book. I really enjoyed it.
     
  14. Diana

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    The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is really, really good and very interesting.

    I also just read The Book Thief and thought it was amazing.

    I've also recently enjoyed Room and The House at Riverton.
     
  15. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    Maybe you would like You Are A Dog: Life Through the Eyes of Man's Best Friend by Terry Bain. It is very funny and is written in the second person, as you are the dog.
     
  16. Illinifan

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    Guy book update:

    Finished Tom Clancy's long awaited new Jack Ryan novel Dead or Alive over Christmas. 4 stars out of 5. The set up for the next one is incredible though.

    I'm reading on both my iPod touch and a Sony PRS-300 in addition to regular pbooks these days.

    Also read SuperFreakanomics before New Year's. Just like the first one, it was excellent.

    Have a couple in progress:

    Climategate by Brian Sussman.
    Decision Points by George W. Bush

    The next fiction book on the list is The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. The next non-fiction, non-serious book will be In Fifty Years We'll All Be Chicks by Adam Carollla.
     
  17. Daniel's Mom 1993

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    The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is really good but kind of "dark"
     
  18. Lee

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    Has anyone read the Game of Thrones series? I am anxiously awaiting my turn for the books!

    The HBO series has me mega intrigued about these books!
     
  19. Pauji5

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    My Name is Memory...... Great!!!! story of past lives - he remembers all of then, she doesn't remember any....
     
  20. sooz

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    I'm reading a new book on my Kindle and wanted to share it if you have not heard of it before. http://www.amazon.com/Unbroken-Surv...WUYPPG/ref=pd_ts_kinc_?ie=UTF8&s=digital-text So well written and amazing!!

    Unbroken: A Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand, author of Seabiscuit. " The the inspiring true story of a man who lived through a series of catastrophes almost too incredible to be believed. In evocative, immediate descriptions, Hillenbrand unfurls the story of Louie Zamperini--a juvenile delinquent-turned-Olympic runner-turned-Army hero. During a routine search mission over the Pacific, Louie?s plane crashed into the ocean, and what happened to him over the next three years of his life is a story that will keep you glued to the pages, eagerly awaiting the next turn in the story and fearing it at the same time. You?ll cheer for the man who somehow maintained his selfhood and humanity despite the monumental degradations he suffered, and you?ll want to share this book with everyone you know. -"
     

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