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Question about lows

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Rusty, Jun 25, 2008.

  1. Rusty

    Rusty Approved members

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    I think my biggest fear with this diabetes is a terrible low. I know there is lots of warning signs to watch for while awake. My question is during sleep is there any kind of signs. I do usually do a check at night but i still worry sometimes it will happen and i wont catch it. If a bad low were to occur while sleeping will it wake them up before point of seizure or will someone never feel it ?? I was just wondering what the thoughts were on this.

    Rusty
     
  2. Mama Belle

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    You are not alone. This is the biggest fear for most parents here. I'll try to answer your questions ...

     
  3. kel4han

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    Sometimes Maddison will wake up and sit up, but go right back to sleep. She normally does not feel her lows either, but I caught her doing that twice and she was low.
     
  4. Heather(CA)

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    What normally happens when a child has an undiscovered low during the night is a rebound. The body kicks glucose out to basically save itself. Then in the morning, their usually high, in the 300's. It can be hard to get this number back down once a rebound has occured. It's possable for the body to not be able to have a rebound, I believe this is after other severe lows and the rebound stores have been used up. I don't test Seth troughout the night unless there's a reason. However if he has had a few lows during the day, or lots of exercise, etc...then I do test during the night.:cwds:
     
  5. Rusty

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    That is very interesting reading about the rebounds. I did not know that the body does that but i was glad to have read that. Thank you.
     
  6. wilf

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    Yes, the body has self-defence mechanisms that try to prevent a low from occurring. It will start putting out hormones that have the effect of increasing blood sugar levels as a low comes on. Bad lows occur when this self-defence mechanism isn't able to do the job.

    There are several possible reasons for bad lows:
    - the child has been given way too much insulin, and although the body is trying to increase blood sugar the excess insulin keeps driving it down;
    - the child has had a lot of exercise the day before, and the muscles are replenishing their stores of sugar by pulling it straight from the bloodstream;
    - previous lows have temporarily exhausted the body's ability to bring blood sugars up.

    Until you really feel like you have a good handle on keeping blood sugars steady through the night, it is a good idea to test - esp. with a child as young as yours. I'm glad that you're doing that.
     
  7. RosemaryCinNJ

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    Dear Rusty...Because your little one is so young like mine was at diagnosis..yes a low will waken them but you have to be on your toes and hear them..it could be a shrill cry or a low sounding cry (different sounding then normally!!) A snack before bed, protein and a carb helps greatly to get them through the night..I found that Amanda had a lot more lows when first diagnosed too..You will be able to recognize signs about your child that they cannot verbally express to you..it takes time but you will..In the meantime, its ok to have your child close by you at night even in your room or get a baby alarm. Try the snack at night right before bed see if that helps or maybe the insulin needs a little adjusting? Good luck..I promise you it does get a little easier as you begin to recognize
    your childs own individual diabetes and how it is to be treated. Good luck :)
     
  8. frizzyrazzy

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    first I want to welcome you Rusty!

    We all had the same fears as you when we were first dx. It's so scary because you just don't know what can happen. What got me to finally sleep is to check at different times each night - one night at 2, one at 1, one at 4, one at 3. Don't just stick with one time frame.

    Try not to dwell on the really horrible horror stories. :)
     
  9. tiffanie1717

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    Hi Rusty. I agree with the posters so much! We started giving Kylie an uncovered snack (usually 15 g or so) before bed. We use dairy products - especially yogurt or ice cream (peanut butter crackers are good, too, but she's not a big pb fan). The fat in these snacks tends to keep them at a higher level through the night, I guess. (Even if she is high we give her the snack. We cover the high with insulin and give her the snack. Don't know if that's completely right, but it's worked well for us!)

    Also, my CDE told me that if the lantus is right, then the chances of going extremely low are slim. I've found that she's right. At least in our case. And we do our lantus in the morning to avoid the chance of the lantus peaking during the night.
     
  10. KatieJane'smom

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    Heather, so are you saying that if there is a pattern of really high numbers in the morning that are hard to get down then the child could be having an undiscovered low during the night? How do you find out? Do you just randomly check all night long? Is there some way to establish that so you know what needs to adjusted?
     
  11. Thoover

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    I know with my daughters low which was 8 months after diagnosis she had a seizure with a BG of 21. She went to bed with a blood reading over 250 and at 11pm she had a seizure. Her body thankfully responded with jerking and a loud deep screem, her hands clintched to her body. Luckily we used cake make gel squeezed it in the cheeck and she came to withing a few min. Once I talked to endo after the sleepless night of tears sometimes the pancreas can kick in since no insulin was given in a huge amount when she went to bed.

    Before the pump we would give a 15 carb snack uncovered and checked at 11, 3 and 6am her BG.
     
  12. Rusty

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    Tracy,
    That must have been so SCARY. made me a little uneasy just reading it. I know our endo says dont put to bed under 150. I have found this number to me to low for ny liken. I think sometimes that would work but i to have found him droping fast just a few hours after bedtime. Sometimes i feel like i am getting a good handle on all of this and other times i feel clueless.

    Rusty
     
  13. alongoria

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    don't worry I still feel that way after 4 years, you have good days and the bad.........
     

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