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Question about ACT or SAT accommodations for diabetics

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Kaylas mom, Oct 14, 2011.

  1. Kaylas mom

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    I assumed I would go through the process to get accommodations for Kayla when she took the SAT or ACT (she is taking the PSAT tomorrow with none). But.. I didn't realize that my son, who is in 7th grade and who has been in the gifted program will be taking the ACT this year. I went to register him for the test and there was a line that said.. Services for students with disabilities (this includes student with diabetes). And that it has to be done differently (and at less cost)

    So.. my thought is that I didn't want to do this for Noah since #1, he isn't on insulin. (that is the big reason) but the dr keeps telling us.. soon, soon he will have to be. But as of now.. he does get high (200's to 300's) for short periods of time, followed by lows (54 is the lowest he has ever tested at) but feels them, but I don't think he stays at the highs or the lows long enough to impact his function, if that makes sense. #2, this one doesn't get reported to colleges. #3 He wants to take the test in Dec and I don't think there is enough time for accommodations.

    So.. my question is, if he doesn't take the exception this year will he be able to take it later when he is in High school?
     
  2. Christopher

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    I don't know the answer, but if he is going into the 300's why isn't he on insulin?

    Logically, if he doesn't need it now he shouldn't ask for it. And if he does need it later, why wouldn't he be able to get it based on his need?
     
  3. Kaylas mom

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    He isn't on insulin because the endo says he doesn't need it yet. Thanks for the thoughts on the test, that is sort of what I was thinking too but I would hate for him not to be able to get when he needs to have it.
     
  4. Christopher

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    I don't understand that, but good luck.
     
  5. MamaC

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    Just allow yourself plenty of time to seek those accommodations from ETS. It takes a while.

    T never requested ETS accommodations...took the PSAT 3 times, ACT once, SAT twice (?).

    Each time we went with a breakfast that didn't require insulin coverage, and that worked fine for us. He did check BG on breaks to be sure.
     
  6. monkeyschool

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    My DD (8th grader) is taking the PSAT this year without accommodations. We homeschool so we never really put anything in place. When she goes into High School next year we may start to make the requests...possibly not for PSATs, but probably for the tests that count, unless we can be 100% certain that we know how a test affects her numbers (this is the first we take since she was dx).

    Good luck. If you learn anything about the accommodations please post.
     
  7. Kaylas mom

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    Thanks for sharing, let know know too if you find anything out.
     
  8. KatieSue

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    We just did this for my daughter who's a sophomore. I personally would go ahead and do the accommodations now, he doesn't have to use them if he doesn't need to. Once you have them in place they're good for the PSAT's, SAT's, ACT's so you don't need to to it again later.

    It was a fairly easy process on my end, most of it was done by the counselor. I had to sign a one page form and provide some basic information, diagnosis date, doctors information, nothing complicated.

    Ours only took a couple of weeks to get - so I did have them in time. But the counselor I was working with told me that if we didn't get the official ones she was the one who ran the test and she'd let Maddie have them anyway since the PSAT doesn't count.

    She took the PSAT's on Wednesday and she didn't need to use them. But she was able to keep her meter with her just in case.

    To answer your question I don't think not doing them now would affect your ability to get them later if you choose to do so.
     
  9. Amy C.

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    You can get the accommodations at any time and once you get them, you can modify them.

    My son had the stop the clock accommodations where if he felt low during a test, he could stop and test, treat if necessary, then carry on when finished.

    This requires that he be in a room by himself with the proctor.

    My son didn't request the accommodation on the ACT and has taken in a couple of times. He took the PSAT and SAT once (without accommodations), received the accommodations and took two subject tests, 1 AP and plans to take 3 more AP tests next spring.

    I would wait until high school to get them.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2011
  10. wdhinn89

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    We did not have any accomodations for the first PSAT that my son took when he was in 10th grade but we did apply for them later in the year from the College Board because the accommodation also covers the AP test's as well.

    You have to apply for the ACT accommodations separately. They are administered from a different company. We did not bother applying because they only cover ACT tests and it was alot of paperwork. We only took the ACT test once to see how Alex would do on the ACT compared to the SAT.
     
  11. ecs1516

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    We were told the record of my son being a type 1 diabetic and being on file at the high school is to be done year or so before needing it. They had told us if we put it in place right before the test the SAT people might not honor it. So, in 9th grade I had a letter from the doctor saying he has been a type 1 diabetic for XX years and a patient of theirs. Their letter also says need to be able to check , treat lows , and use the bathroom as needed. The school said this would be a 'stop the clock' test for him. Not actually extra time for test taking but to treat as needed. The doctor also filled out forms on 'Information for diabetes for the school. Not 504 forms (we are in a private school) but forms like that I guess from a Children's Healthcare book.
    I also will have to request accommodations from ACT and SAT when closer to the test. School said that for the sophomore test that I really don't need to ask for accommodations because they test there or something?

    Here is the letter we got from school.

    Dear Parents:

    As a student at (our school name) ends the sophomore year and moves into the junior and senior years, he or she will begin taking standardized tests such as the PSAT, the SAT, and the ACT. For students who have disabilities that have been measured by a professional, these tests can provide accommodations. Here is the process for receiving those accommodations. Important Note: Parents must take part in this process. This is not an automatic (our school name) process.

    For the Junior PSAT, and SAT: We do not suggest using accommodations for the Sophomore PSAT. The test is given in the sophomore year for practice and taking the test without accommodations shows us a base line. For the junior PSAT and the SAT, you must go to www.collegeboard.com/ssd/student/index.html. Read the entire section. When you fill out the paper work, female students should present it to Mrs. YYYY and male students should present it to Mr. XXX. Keep in mind that this can be an involved process. Do not wait until the last minute.



    For the Plan (given in the spring of the freshman year), the Explore (given in the sophomore year) or for ACT (taken by junior as practice in the spring and by juniors and seniors as they register): Go to www.act.org/aap/disab/index.html. Make sure you read this carefully. Again, Mrs. YYYY is the contact for the girls; Mr. XXXX is for the boys. Our suggestion is not to worry about the accommodations until you are taking the real ACT, but this is a parent decision.


    Several things to keep in mind about these groups:

    a. They are not against you. They want to supply accommodations to students who need them, but
    b. They require very specific documentation. Their sites go into detail on which tests they will take to prove that the accommodations are legitimate.
    c. A student must have these accommodations from (our school name) for the testing sites to offer them.
    d. Their decision is final and it is their decision. (our school name) cannot give accommodations for these tests.

    If you have any questions, feel free to email us. If we don't have the answer, we will try to point you to the source that does.

    Mr. XXXX
    Dean of Counseling
     
  12. Kaylas mom

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    Thanks everyone this is some great information!
     
  13. Jensmami

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    In New York it has to be in place for the whole school year, otherwise the college board will not honor it. I filed for extended time for the first time this year. We never had issues (she took 2 regents which are HS test in 8th grade) but I don't want to regret that we didn't do it, in case that she has a bad low or high.
     
  14. wdhinn89

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    I'm not too sure about it having to be in place for the whole year. We received our approval letter from the CollegeBoard Oct 7,2009 and the letter stated we needed to contact the school 2 weeks before the test to make sure they were aware of my sons accomodations and to bring the letter with us for the first time. Because his test was 1 week later and it was only the sophomore PSAT, we did not bother.


    We were notified from the school about his accomodations for his May AP exam. My letter said nothing about waiting a year.

    http://professionals.collegeboard.com/testing/ssd/guidelines/sat
     
  15. Kaylas mom

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    after dropping Kayla off this am, I wonder if I shouldn't have had something in place for her already. I guess I need to get the ball rolling since she will be taking an AP test this spring.
     
  16. nanhsot

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    Here are my experiences, we're in the midst of a lot of this too. Kids in school can get help from your guidance counselor, but as a homeschooler I've had to navigate this on my own.

    We tried to go without anything special with for his 1st PSAT (a year ago, he took it again Wednesday with accomodation) but the adrenalin had him high, it was a mistake. On any College Board tests (SAT, PSAT, AP) exams you are not allowed to have anything on you but a calculator, so he couldn't have his meter and couldn't treat/do a correction (he was on MDI then).

    College Board tests you just register with the office of student disabilities, I sent in a letter from our MD and listed what accomodations we wanted. We just requested that he be able to have insulin on him, have a meter/be able to test when needed, treat when needed, and have snacks on him. We did NOT request extra time or extra breaks. They were very helpful and guided me through the whole process.

    That process took about a month, I mailed it in and got a letter in return with the approval and the information on how to register that approval.

    This was approved and he has a SSD # that will now be used for all his testing needs through the college board, it's a one time application process, not every test. This will last his whole high school career, for all College Board tests. Once I got that # we were able to use it weeks later for the SAT I had him signed up for (I went back into his account and updated with the info, he was already signed up).

    Now when I sign him up for these tests, I put that number down and the info is there.

    PSAT IS through the College Board but they do run things differently, more casually~no online signup or anything, just a phone call to register at a local private school. I told them his # but they also wanted a copy of the letter, we test at a small private school. She looked at it and had no issues with any of his needs, let him do what he needed at his desk.

    SAT they gave him a separate room and his own monitor, which was overkill but he loved it!

    ACT is not done through the College Board, so that # is not valid for that test. For that one, I signed him up then fax all the documents to them. I called the office for students with disabilities and they talked me through the process, for me there was no forms or paperwork, just a fax with his needs to their office (able to test at his desk, keep his meter, pump, cgm with him, able to treat with insulin, able to treat with water or food).

    I definitely recommend getting special accomodations, it was tough to do it without them. Testing ran him very high and he did not do well on the tests. I know that this has been discussed here and many do without anything special but it was worth it to jump some hoops and now he'll be able to get what he needs from here on out.
     
  17. Caldercup

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    This was our experience as well. The counselor asked for our endo team to prep a letter (I can send you that for reference if you'd like.) The counselor handled everything else.

    He just took the PSAT this past week, and I was surprised to learn that none of the accomodations we asked for were followed. He took it in the room with everyone else, and --since he had no problems with his BGs-- never tested or treated. Now... this was just a prelim PSAT and maybe that's why.
     
  18. HBMom

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    My ds is taking the PSAT as we speak. We did get him accommodations with help from his counselor, but he really didn't want to test in a room by himself, so we decided that he wouldn't use them this time because his score really doesn't count at this point (he's a sophomore). We will see how it goes - I asked him to bolus a bit less for breakfast, but of course he didn't do that. He will test his blood sugar at the break, and I told him that if it is high, it might be from adrenaline. His counselor said she would let the proctor know that he has D, but I don't know if she actually remembered to do that. Next week he takes the PLAN, but we didn't get accommodations yet from the ACT (the counselor said you have to apply each time you take it, but with the SAT you only have to apply once) so he will do that on his own as well.
     
  19. Kaylas mom

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    Thanks, it seems to have went well. Kayla tested during the 5 min break and then they had a 1 min break so she quickly tested again. Her numbers were fine (which I was shocked since she ate cereal for bkfast) There would have been nothing that she could have done tho if she needed to treat a low.
     
  20. Christopher

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    Couldn't she have just discretely taken some glucose tabs?
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2011

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