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Pumps

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Issysmummy, Jun 22, 2014.

  1. Issysmummy

    Issysmummy New Member

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    Hi, I hope i'm posting this in the right place. My daughter is 4 years old and I'm looking at getting her a pump to see if it would help give us more control over her diabetes but I'm just not sure which one to go with. If anyone has a child using a pump would you mind telling me why you chose that pump, the things you like about it and the things you don't?

    Thanks

    Vicky
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

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    Hi Vicky, this thread might be of help http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes....like-amp-dislike-about-it&highlight=best+pump

    Becuase you are in the UK you have other options and some of the names may not be exactly the same but the basic concepts are the same.

    Generally it comes down to 1. tubed vs. patch pump, 2. integrated CGM or not, 3. cartridge size 4. remote bolus capability and 5. personal preference and comfort.

    Let us know if you have any specific questions
     
  3. Lori_Gaines

    Lori_Gaines Approved members

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    Our 4 year old is on the Animas Ping. We love it.
     
  4. Mimikins

    Mimikins Approved members

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    I am on the saline run for the T:Slim (I am going in on July 1st to begin insulin for it), and I am very satisfied by it.

    Advantages:
    • Rechargeable battery. It is really easy for me to plug my TSlim into my laptop, log into the T:Connect app, and write down my notes and comments for the previous day while my pump charges. I find it more convenient to let myself charge for 15-20 minutes (usually while I eat breakfast and analyze my glucose from the past day) and not worry about realizing that my pump needs batteries and needing to make a beeline to Walmart to get some.
    • Touch screen. I get fairly impatient waiting for a specific number to scroll up. It makes bolusing and entering BG levels a lot quicker, and the technology is simple enough for my technology-deficient parents to understand and use.
    • The size. It's roughly the size of a deck of cards when not connected to the carrying case. With the case, it's small enough for me to clip to anything and not look incredibly noticeable.
    • Micro-delivery technology. I am not concerned that 300 units of insulin can gush out from the pump and into my body. This also allows me to deliver much smaller amounts of insulin
    • After-bolus BG reminder. I am really lazy, and this reminder allows me to worry about one less thing. I also use the site-change reminders.
    • Ability to create 6 different profiles. This will come in handy once I begin the process with my D-team to add different profiles besides my normal delivery amounts. For example, I notice that I tend to go really low during certain weeks due to hormones. I can easily go into my pump, create a profile where I am receiving less basal than normal (or increased I:C, SF, insulin duration, etc.) and be able to really fine-tune my BG control.
    • 300 unit cartridge. My insulin needs are nowhere near that maximum amount, but it is a pump that I can "grow into" if I become more insulin-resistant. If not, I have the freedom to eat all the chocolate I want.
    • The appearance. It's a pretty cool-looking pump and looks a lot like the iPhone. I am sure that people only believe that I am on my phone whenever I am doing something with my pump.
    Disadvantages:
    • The load process. It is a long, drawn-out, pain-in-my-rear-end. From beginning to end, it takes at least 7 minutes. It makes accidentally ripping out a site all the more painful.
    • Micro-delivery technology. It makes taking large boluses such a long process. It can only deliver 2 units per unit, so it will take a full 5 minutes for my bolus to be fully delivered if I want to bolus 10 units.
    • The alarms, even when on the highest setting, sound pretty quiet. I will disconnect my pump to go swimming, and my pump typically stays in my beach bag. I can only faintly hear my pump through the bag whenever it is giving me the "RECONNECT ME NOW!!!" alarm. In addition, the vibrations also seems very weak.
     
  5. andiej

    andiej Approved members

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    Not sure the T-Slim is available in the UK. The only ones i've heard used in the UK (i'm in the UK) is the Medtronic, Animas Vibe, Omnipod, Accu Chek Combo and occasionally the Cellnovo. The Roche Accu Chek combo is being phased out to make way for the new Insight which looks way more modern, the accu check is the most widely used in the UK as some hospitals wont' give a choice and just give that one, suspect it's due to costs. Medtronic and Animas Vibe both offer integrated CGM now so if you are thinking of self funding a CGM that could be the cheapest option to do so, We use the Omnipod because my son wanted to be tube free and waterproof, we love it, though you will soon find out most people love their pump which ever they choose. It's worth checking out information on each of the manufacturers sites for a full breakdown of each pumps features as they do vary. Reading on here you might have reservations about the Omnipod as lots of people here had issues with failed pods when the new smaller pods came out, though the rep told me the sensitivity was to high on the initial small pods and that has now been rectified which i'm presuming is true we have been pumping for 3 months and had no issues, however there are UK based facebook groups that you might find helpful and more relevant to the UK as the problems don't seem to have been the same over here in the UK from what i've read. I'm sure there are Facebook groups for each pump and you might find that a helpful way to get feedback about each pump. Good luck with choosing and whatever you go with i hope you love pumping as much as we do. People choose different pumps for different reasons, what is important to one is less important to another.

    You ask for pros and cons for the pump we use so here goes.

    1) Automatic insertion with no needles to be seen, very quick change of pod, fill it up stick it on press the insertion button it's done...takes 4 minutes tops.

    2) Tubeless so no air bubbles in tubes and my son wasn't keen on a tube, this bothers others less.

    3) waterproof we have not needed to remove for swimming, bodyboarding etc

    4) discrete cannot be seen under his t shirt so no need for additional pump bags etc

    5) wireless remote so i can bolus him /check records without interrupting him

    6) integrated blood glucose meter in the remote that uses the freestyle strips which take the smallest amount of blood of any other strip (same as freestyle lite)


    as for the cons

    1) in an ideal world the remote would be less bulky and more like an iphone but this is just me trying to create the perfect pump for my world and not really an issue

    2) some people are worried that looking for a handset to do a bolus might be a hassle ( as we use it for blood sugar testing we keep it with his test strips so this isn't a concern as we'd have to get the blood glucose meter anyway)

    3) the menu navigation for some things can be a bit long winded but it doesn't really worry me

    I hope this helps.
     
  6. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

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    • I agree that the load process is sort of a PITA, compared with other tubed pumps. I think I timed myself last time I did a full cartridge change, and it took me 6 minutes? Anyway, I just wanted to point out that you don't have to go through that whole process if your rip a site out. Just change the site and fill cannula. That would take us about 30 seconds, tops, and no longer on the t:slim than any other pump. :)

      We have used the Medtronic, the Omnipod and the t:slim. I like the t:slim best, but I'm not sure that is available to you.

      t:slim advantages: Most user friendly and best, most logical menus, by far. Ability to create separate profiles not only of basal patterns, but I:Cs and ISF as well. Small and discrete. Most reminders, including a site change reminder. Best "looking" interface. Ability to type in numbers, as opposed to scrolling, which you have to do with the other pumps.

      t:slim disadvantages: Long (relatively speaking) load and prime process. Rechargeable battery. (This is a plus for some, but I'd prefer an external battery.) Screen is hard to read in direct sunlight. Although waterproof, should be disconnected for water sports.

      Medtronic advantages: In our experience, at least, the pump itself is extremely durable. Extremely. Integrated CGM. Screen easy to read in sunlight. Fast load and prime process.

      Medtronic disadvantages: Somewhat fussy interface, especially in the basal settings. Ugly, outdated interface. Although waterproof, should disconnect for water sports.

      Omnipod advantages: Automatic insertion with the push of a button. Remote control of all pump features. (Remote must be very close to pod.) No issues with having to disconnect for water sports.

      Omnipod disadvantages: If a site needs to be changed, you have to change everything out, unlike a tubed pump. We carried insulin with us on day trips when we used the pod, and do not need to with a tubed pump. Loud, occasionally embarrassing and intrusive alarms that occasionally cannot be silenced without running over the thing with a forklift. You cannot push a site past 72+8 hours, and it will start beeping at you when you hit 72 hours. Irritating alarm 2 hours after you change a pod that must be cleared. A relatively recent history of widespread bad pods and really bad customer service during that time and the new pod roll-out.

      Hope this helps!
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2014
  7. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

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    I've seen the same complaints from many other ex-OmniPod users, so I have no doubt that some of the disadvantages you've listed were a major issue with the OmniPod before the new Pods came onto the scene. From the perspective of someone whose child was diagnosed and began pumping with the OmniPod after the new Pods came out, I'd like to relate our experience. My daughter and I absolutely love the OmniPod. We have had only one bad site (not a bad Pod), and changing to a new Pod (just like "regular" changes every 3 days) was a breeze. Like another poster said, the process takes about 3 minutes or so once you get the hang of it. Because there is no tubing, priming takes very little time. Cannula insertion is automatic with no introducer needle visible. We do have to carry insulin with us when we leave home in order to put on a new Pod in the event of a Pod or site failure, but we have not (knock wood) had a Pod fail yet, not once. Even though we have to carry a replacement Pod plus insulin with us, I suspect this isn't much more of a hassle than having to carry a new site for a tubed pump in the event of a site failure. Granted, one does have to keep insulin from degrading in high temperatures, but we are almost always either inside an air-conditioned car or an air-conditioned building when we are out and about, or we carry the insulin in a Frio wallet. I've not had the displeasure of hearing a bad Pod "scream" (and hopefully never will), but if this were to occur, the new Pods have this little hole on the underside into which you can poke the end of a paper clip in order to silence the shrieking. You can turn off almost all of the alarms in Settings. The alarms that we use include the reminder to check BG about 1-1/2 hours after putting on a new Pod (I like this one because I might forget otherwise, and I'd hate to find out about a bad site hours later than this when my daughter's BG would likely be in the 300's) and the "10 units remaining" alarm (which I also appreciate for obvious reasons). Plus, these alarms (at least on the new PDMs) are not all that loud or obnoxious. I also appreciate the 72-hour alarm because I would never want to push a site past 72 hours out of fear that it would lead to lipoatrophy. Too much lipoatrophy eventually equals not enough real estate remaining for Dexcom sensor sites and/or pump sites... On a more positive note, I've experienced nothing short of excellent customer service whenever I've contacted Insulet.

    I do find the need to have the PDM relatively close to the active Pod in order for it receive commands from the PDM annoying at times!

    Not trying to start an argument or "World War Pump" here, I just want to point out that Pod failures and problems with FreeStyle test strips are a thing of the past for the most part (unless you still have some FreeStyle test strips with expiry dates earlier than 08/15 that you need to exchange). I suspect that these problems occur with about the same frequency as problems with traditional tubed pumps. No, the OmniPod is not the right pump for everyone, but it has turned out to be the perfect pump for my daughter at this point in time. Who knows, when she's eligible for another pump in 6(?) years (not sure when insurance will cover the cost of another), she might choose a tubed pump at that point in time. Or maybe the artificial/bionic pancreas will be available (and covered by insurance) by then. And maybe, just maybe there will be a cure by then (but I'm not holding my breath). :frown:
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2014
  8. Cheetah-cub

    Cheetah-cub Approved members

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    We are also happy OmniPod users. We started pumping this March, and no failed pod so far (knock on wood too!!)

    We have not experienced loud alarms so far either. Our Dexcom can alarm us daily with highs or lows. But our omnipod is rather quiet, doesn't make much noise.

    I dropped off my 10-year-old on her first T1D camp this morning. The camp asked us to prepare one pod for each day. So, after sending her off with 8 pods. I only have 4 pods left at home. I called Omnipod immediately, and within 2 hours, they sent me the shipping confirmation. I will get my new 3 month supply of pods tomorrow!

    I only had to call them a few times, and every time, they have been really good to me.

    I am sorry that some of you had bad experience with them, I can only imagine how frustrating it would be when the pump keeps failing. But it seems that their product and their service have been good to the new families/users. I hope they will keep this up.
     
  9. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

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    The pods have always had the hole with the paper clip to disable "screaming." It doesn't always work. We've had fun threads on here before about the various ways people have killed screaming pods. ;) And I would note that I'm not talking about regular Omnipod alarms here. Believe me, when you get a screaming pod, you'll know it.

    I'm not going to refute other posters' refutations of my opinions, except to note that I provided positives AND negatives for each pump that we have used, and I don't believe my negatives are unique to the old pods (indeed, one is unique to the new pods).
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2014
  10. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

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    Yes my dd has officially gone "cavewomen' on a new smaller POD when it would not shut up!!!

    lets just say a rock bigger than her 2 firsts and a hammer have been used, and the remains CSI material.


    I do have to say that its been since December that she last wore a POD and the reports of screamers has subsided. I have also read on UK sites that the newer smaller PODs had a high sensitivity sensor for issues and that it has now been lowered. Although I have not read that anywhere here or in the US.

    There are some great positives for the POD and so great negatives. I just would never have the POD be our only insurance covered pump since they have the cut the cord program.
     
  11. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

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    Our Pump Lady recommended putting a shrieking Pod in the freezer for 24 hours if sticking a paper clip into it (or smashing it with a large rock or running over it with a steamroller) did not shut its screaming little pie-hole. I wonder how audible it would be once in the freezer. And I wonder whether it would resume shrieking once it defrosted...:wink:
     
  12. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

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    Yes but in order to do that it has to be removed from the body!

    The darn thing sticks to some kids so well that only a remover will get it off without skin damage. My kiddos are that type, so for us if a POD went AWAL during school it meant a pickup from school for mom or dad to remove and get a new one on.

    A pump "site" that goes bad, well just leave it there and slap on a new one. Who cares if the kiddo has an old site attached.

    But if you have a screaming pod on you, you have to get it off to go back to class! and for my kiddo, that meant I had to come to school and get it off. The site is either on her arm where she can not see easily or on her booty where I am sorry, even with someone you know should not be in charge of!!!

    If on tummy or the leg where modesty can be preserved, than ok. But here is so many POD placements that it is an issue. If you can turn the darn thing off, not an issue. But if it is alarming, your kiddo can not be in school, without disrupting another children" s education, unless you have 1:1 care in place already.
     
  13. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

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    I fervently hope that my daughter never experiences a shrieking Pod, much less one that occurs while at school. If something like that had ever happened to me when I was her age (about a bazillion years ago when my little sister and I had a real live baby dinosaur for a pet), I would have just curled up and died! Fortunately for my daughter, the OmniPod adhesive seems to be tailor-made: it sticks on for dear life, even through long soaks in the bathtub, and then magically and easily peels off after a brief dip in water at the end of Day 3 (we did end up using a bit of Uni-Solve on a particularly tenacious Pod, so I'll make sure that my daughter goes to school armed with a crapton of Uni-Solve packets in anticipation of eventually having a demon Pod.) I believe that if my daughter was to end up with a shrieker during school, she and her classmates would find it hilarious (at least up until the moment when they realized that they had suffered permanent hearing damage) and would welcome the ear-splitting break from the tedium of learning. My daughter's teachers on the other hand, not so much.
     
  14. MomofSweetOne

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    I'd talk through the possibility with her now because it will happen. Maybe not as often as we've experienced, but sooner or later, it will. It can be very embarrassing for a teen in public depending upon how those around deal with it.
     
  15. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

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    Good point. At her next Pod change, I'm going to show her where the little paper clip hole is (the one that is supposed to silence a shrieking Pod) and have her practice (kind of like a fire drill of sorts). I'll have to make sure to keep a paper clip in a specific area in her OmniPod kit. We'll also need to devise a plan in the event that the paper clip doesn't silence the defective Pod while she is at school. Does anyone know of a YouTube video that shows a shrieking Pod? I'd like her to be as prepared as possible and actually hearing a shrieking Pod in advance of her first experience would be ideal.

    I've heard of people running over noisy Pods, putting them in the freezer, hitting them with hammers. Are there any other techniques that anyone has used successfully?
     
  16. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

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    I think if you try to deactivate the POD when she is not close to you and then she comes into range the PDM as deactivated but the POD has not, you can replicate a screaking pod that is still attached to the body, because you have to get the thing off to put the paper clip in!

    We had more than a few at school, those PODS stuck good to my dd and it was a 30minute exercise from it alarming to getting it off of her body and a new one on. Most of the time I choose not to have her put a new one on at school because she had gotten all but 0.05 of the bolus and was towards the end of the day and she had Lantus going.

    My dd is the one that has come 'cave woman" on a POD while out on a spur of the moment fishing trip and we were not prepared. Imagine her ripping off a POD that was very well stuck, and hitting it with a rock until it stopped. She actually picked it up and thru it at the biggest "boulder" and it started alarming again!

    My god the frustrations she was able to work out with that rock and POD! It was very therapeutic.
     
  17. Sprocket

    Sprocket Approved members

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    I have to say how great it is to hear of so many on Omnipod that are very happy. Our diabetic team strongly favours Animas and during our pump introduction, that was very apparent. We haven't made the leap to a pump yet, but we loved the features of the Omnipod, but were feeling swayed by the preference of the educators. Is that common?
     
  18. chalke43

    chalke43 Approved members

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    I read this last week and wanted to test it myself, as it didn't seem right. Gave a 10 unit bolus for Saturday night's dinner, and the t-slim beeped less than 3 minutes later to confirm that the bolus completed. For us, this amount of time is OK, for others, it may not be.
     
  19. funnygrl

    funnygrl Approved members

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    I had a pod shriek because of auto-off and found cupping a hand over it largely muffled the sound until I could get to a private place to take it off.
     

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