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Pumps and honeymoons

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by januaryblue, Oct 24, 2010.

  1. januaryblue

    januaryblue Approved members

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    My daughter is still honeymooning nicely. Her morning numbers are usually between 70-90 when she wakes up, although the past couple weeks we have seen more numbers in the 100's (this morning was 117). Her needs for insulin are slowly creeping up though, when we started insulin it was 1/2 unit Novolog for 60 carbs and now we are at 1/2 unit for 40 carbs. At 60 carbs she barely ever took Novolog since she's little and doesn't eat that much, but at 40 carbs we are hitting that a little more. She also takes 1/2 unit of novolog if her blood sugars are 300 or above. She also takes 1.5 units of Lantus in the morning and 1 unit at night.

    We went to the endo last week and the social worker informed us that Medtronic had reps there if we were interested in talking to them. I said sure. In all honesty I had assumed we would wait until she was on more shots in a day, not 2-4 a day as she is now. I also wanted to meet with Animas, so no action was taken that day (and the sales guy was terrible, didn't really answer my questions).

    I did ask the CDE what her opinion was on my daughter and the pump and I pressed her to give me her personal opinion about our specific case. She said that personally at that young and tiny with such little insulin needs she would not do the pump yet. She said she thought it would be more hassle to have her wearing the pump all the time. But she did say that ultimately the decision was ours.

    Fast forward to last night. SG stayed with our family friends house with her sister across town. My husband and I had a great night, but of course around 5:30 we had to stop everything, drive across town and give her her lantus. Then they did a bedtime test. She had eaten some treats, but not 40 carbs worth but her blood sugar was 372, again drive across town to give her a shot. This morning was the same thing, drive across town to give her Lantus.

    It's not that big of a deal, but it did make me start thinking about the pump a little more. It would have been nice to tell my friend to push a few buttons and she would be well taken care of. Also school is another area that I am concerned with her needs going up a little. There is no school nurse but once a week. I also would think that you would be able to fine tune her insulin needs. At this point giving her 0.5 units of Novolog for 40 carbs and if she doesn't eat 40 carbs she still goes high sometimes like last nights 372. It would be nice to maybe give her .25 units for 20 carbs and keep her steady.

    So all that to say, what are your personal opinions about this? Would you pump yet or not?
     
  2. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

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    Oh my goodness, yes. I think kids with very small insulin needs are the BEST candidates for the pump. On the Revel, you can give a bolus of 0.025 units. That's twenty-five THOUSANDTHS of a unit. You have to be very, very good to draw up 0.25 units on a syringe accurately, and that's 10x greater than the smallest amount possible on a pump.

    Jack's quality of life improved about 1000% on the pump. My daughter is 3, and if she were to be diagnosed today, I'd be on the phone ordering her pump tomorrow.
     
  3. JeremysDad

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    I was told that D's need to be out or coming out of honeymoon before they are eligible to pump. I was also told that D's should be Dx'd at least a year before pumping. What's the reason to wait if the pump offers better insulin dosing?

    I believe the reasoning was that better control can be had with the pump after honeymoon. That might have something to do with the additional insulin they still produce. Jeremy is not quite 1 year after Dx'd but his current Endo wants him on the pump yesterday!!
     
  4. hawkeyegirl

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    There are plenty of honeymooning kids who pump on this site. We started pumping at 5 months post-diagnosis, while still honeymooning, and it was life-changing. Honeymooning kids often need very small doses of insulin that can most easily be given by the pump.

    Truly, I cannot think of a reason for a honeymooning child to NOT be prescribed the pump if that's what the family wants to do.
     
  5. pianoplayer4

    pianoplayer4 Approved members

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    I would say that since your dd is 11 then you should ask her what she wants to do. if she is alright with wearing the pump all the time, ad thinks its an even trade then i would go for it. if she doesn't want the pump yet or is hesitant then I would wait, you don't want her to hate the pump. maybe you could work on her giving her own shots =)
     
  6. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

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    It's the 5 year old who has D.
     
  7. januaryblue

    januaryblue Approved members

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    I agree that I think the pump would make for better control in honeymoon.

    And yes, it's the 5 year old with diabetes. I wouldn't trust her to do her own shots, heck, 10 minutes ago I had to wipe her tushy. LOL. (Thankfully that doesn't happen often anymore.)

    We've been around a few D kids at a camp and at her school and she has seen their pumps and so now she is interested in it, but she is of course nervouse about a different type of needle.

    Still thinking about it. :cwds:
     
  8. mmgirls

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    I could have written this, except my youngest dd is almost 2.5yrs.
    She is positive for 2 of auto-antibodies and we are going fora glucose tolerance test at Stanford. If she were to be DX, we would be getting on the phone for a pump ASAP. It is truly easier for little ones even if you were just go to pump boluses and IOB calculations and still give a 24hour insulin for basal.
     
  9. jules12

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    my son was pumping 1 month after dx. His Total Daily Dose of Insulin was 3 units at the time. It worked for us. There is no right or wrong answer about when to pump, if to pump, etc. If you are curious or interested, check it out. Whether you are honeymooning or not should not factor in unless you really don't need insulin yet.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2010

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