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Pump for a 3 yr. old

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Mommaof7, Jul 19, 2007.

  1. Mommaof7

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    :confused:We saw our Endo for the first time yesterday. I was pretty unimpressed, not what I thought it would be. I'd love to hear what a normal visit with your endo is, especially if it's the first time.

    Here's my deal, I am really looking at getting Zech the pump. Our pediatrician, diabetic nutritionist, and diabetic educator all felt he should get it. All have said it's much better, etc... So we go to the endo and he says, he thinks Zech is too active and will rip it out and that he thinks kids should til at least 5 or 6 to get one, he also says that he thinks that it won't necessarily be better that sometimes it is sometimes it isn't. I really didn't care for this Dr. at all, it wasn't just the pump thing, but that frankly I didn't see a single point in going to the appt. He never looked at anything as far as his lab results or his log book or his bg's since he was diagnosed last month.

    Anyhow, my husband just kinda goes with whatever a Dr. says and I want him to see that this Dr. may be wrong. So all of you who have a child that got on the pump at or before 3 years old, PLEASE post your experience, likes dislikes etc.. Is it better? My husband even said, maybe the pump is the lazy way out. I don't agree. Anyhow, give me your input!

    TIA,
    Cori
     
  2. D-Dad

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    Pumping is just as good if not better than MDI. The ease of giving small doses, the custom basal, the ease of giving a bolus, being able to pre bolus some and then giving the rest after you know that they have eaten, super bolus, the ability to reduce the basal to avoid a low.

    Get the info from the pump companies, set up meetings with each - where they come to your house and show you the pump. Speak with each one of them about the pump and the local doctors (they know the doctors) - get a new doctor.

    Our initial doctor put us on NPH and Novolog. Then wanted us to try Lantus and Novolog for two to three months before going on the pump. We got a new doctor and got the pump within two weeks.
     
  3. Kirsten

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    Putting Griffin on the pump was life-changing for us AND for Griffin. He totally does NOT remember that he used to get several shots a day.

    I could go on and on about the medical benefits, but emotionally the impact was even greater.

    The first week after pump start I decided to hold back on morning snack until Griffin was truly hungry. At 11:30 he turned to me and said, "Mommy, I'm hungry." I was busy so I told him to wait a minute. He said, "No, I'm *really* hungry." I could tell by the stunned expression on his face that this was the first time since diagnosis that his body had a chance to be hungry, since we were always offering him food every 2 hours pre-pump. It made me happy to regain a little control of the family schedule.
     
  4. EmmasMom

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    My daughter started on her pump at 14 months, and it absolutely changed our lives for the better. The small doses, (without a poke!) and adjustable basal insulin are perfect for small children, and the fact that the pump's software tracks every dose and calculates boluses for you is a huge stress relief. The benefits are endless.

    Can an active 3 year-old pull out a pump site, of course they can. But so can a 5 or 6 year-old. Most kids accept the pump with surprising ease. Kids are very adaptable, and I think the younger they are, the easier it is for them to accept.

    Most people can achieve better control with a pump because of the flexibility, but even if your control doesn't improve your quality of life will. (obviously there are people that don't feel this way, but most pumpers agree that it's true)

    If you don't like this endo, try to find another one asap! Having a great endo and d-team is priceless!

    Good Luck!
     
  5. nebby3

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    My dd began pumping at age 2. Occasionally we have had sites ripped out but not very often. There are ways to have a small child wear it where it will not be easy for them to do. Our CDE told us, and as my kids get older I think it is true, that a younger child will be a lot more accepting of beginning pumping than a 5-6 yo. As thery get older, it is harder for them to adjust and change. I would also think an active child needs the pump more because you can do temp rates and adjust more easily when they are active.
     
  6. Cyndi

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    My daughter started pumping when she was 16 months old. As Emma's mom said it literally changed our lives. We had such a hard time trying to get her blood sugar "under control". She needed such small doses of insulin and we just couldn't achieve it with a syringe. We were also constantly forcing her to eat and with a toddler this was very hard to do sometimes.

    On pulling the sites out, my daughter has been pumping for 2 years now and she has pulled out maybe 2 sites. I believe they are harder to pull out than one might think. She is VERY active and rough. She now has two sites as she is on the CGMS and she hasn't pulled that out either.

    Pumping does make life easier but by no means is a lazy way out. You have to really stay on top of things in case for some reason they don't recieve insulin for an extended amount of time.

    Also, if you weren't comfortable with the endo. I would switch. We moved to Missouri for about a year and we saw an endo. that didn't even touch Mackenzie. We switched and by switching we had to drive 2 1/2 hours to see a different one. Good quality care is worth it!
     
  7. Budapest

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    Hi,

    Our son was diagnosed at 22 months -- 11 months ago. We had a doctor similar to your for the 2 weeks of hospitalization and another 4 weeks. During this time we researched on the internet anything and everything that one can find about D and treatment options. (Unfortunately at the we have not yet found this forum.) Weighing the pros (lots and lots) and cons (seemingly minor at least for our circumstances) almost made it a no-brainer. The only remaining question was when. Is it really OK for a toddler? Additional internet searching brought the answer that it is even more important for a toddler than an older, bigger, more predictable child.

    After 4 weeks we switched to a more progressive endo and 2 weeks later we were pumping with Animas that has the smallest basal and bolus increments (0.05 U and 0.025 U/hr respectively) and that always delivers the basal on steady basis (every 3 minutes as opposed to 1-2 times an hour).

    I would definitely not say that pump therapy is the easy way out. It does require more thinking, fine tuning than MDI or regular injections. This comes instead of putting your energies into meal and day planning and fighting toddler moods and forcing a toddler to eat that happens not to be hungry that day.

    The book we read before starting was Pumping Insulin 4th ed.

    It also discusses the pros and cons, so it might make sens to get it even if you have not made up your mind yet.

    Good luck -- go for the pump.
     
  8. Lizzy731

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    Isn't it your decision to make if your son is too active or too young to be on the pump? Do YOU feel he will rip it off? I saw an episode of House recently when a mother said to Dr. House, "you are the doctor but I am the mother. I outrank you". I thought that was the best line ever! :D We had to fight our endo for Bethany's pump and I couldn't stand the arguments that they were throwing our way. My husband and I know our daughter the best and we are better equiped to make the decision if she could handle the pump or not. Not the endo!

    Get another endo...the pump is fantastic and great for young children who need very small boluses with their meals. Go with your gut and dump this guy!
     
  9. Budapest

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    Great line, I love it. :cool: Where do fathers fit in the picture?:D
     
  10. Val

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    SImon was diagnosed at 20 mos old. Our original doctor said he shouldn't be on a pump until 8 or 9 years old with no good reasons. We switched doctors & he wanted us to be on MDI for about a year, but ultimately when we pushed, he supported us.

    He has been on the pump since he was 2 1/2. It was the best decision we ever made. Yes, he is extremely active but no, he has never (knock wood) pulled a set out. We were worried about him playing with the buttons, but he doesn't. Besides, you can lock the keypad.

    I agree with Nebby3 - that the older they get, the less accepting of change they will be. It makes so much sense to us to get him started now, before he got so used to shots that he was afraid to try the pump.

    Two days after pumping we knew that we had made the right decision. We didn't realize how chronically cranky Simon was until he had more stable numbers. Don't get me wrong, his numbers were OK beforehand, but just a lot more rapid changes. Sometimes you get so used to something, you just don't realize anything was wrong. He was definatley better than pre-diagnosis, but we just thought he was a grumpy 2 year old! NOw he is much more stable & it was almost an instant change in his personality. Our doctor says he hears that a lot, but doesn't mention it beforehand because everyone has a different experience.

    When they are this young, they are so adaptable & it just becomes a part of him. We talked about the JDRF walk and how the people were there to support him, so that one day he may not have to wear a pump. His reply was "no mommy, i LOVE my pump!"

    Best of luck & feel free to email me if you have any questions. Simon is now 3 1/2

    Val :D

    ps. I also wanted to mention that the pump relieved our entire family of a TON of stress related to eating & trying to get him to eat, etc.
     
  11. LJS118

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    First off, the pump isn't by any means the "easy way out" as you said your husband said. Pumping actually takes A Lot more work, but it is Sooooooo Great for your child. We've been pumping for almost 6 years and my son Never wants to go back on shots again. He was 5 when he started pumping.
    As for your endo I'm shocked. Especially since your child was just diagnosed. My endo spends between 30-45 min with my son at EVERY visit. He does a complete exam, does blood work, and analyzes all of my son's blood sugars etc. etc.
    I would suggest getting a new doc.
    Just my opinion.
    good luck
     
  12. Lizzy731

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    The mom and dad were divorced in the show.:rolleyes:
     
  13. hold48398

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    I can't really add much to the many pro-pump comments you have already received. All I can say is that going to the pump has been THE single most important and BEST decision we have made since dx. Period.

    I'm sorry you had a disappointing endo appointment. As far as our endo goes, we usually spend a good hour with the doc/nurses during every appointment...and that's after almost three years!! Mia gets measured, weighted and finger pricked for both her A1C as well her current BG. Her meter gets uploaded into the computer. Then she gets a physical exam (checking pump sites, fingertips, sensitivity to stimulation on arms and legs (I guess checking for nerve damage), etc etc). Then we review her daily regimen, BG numbers, and any questions struggles etc. school issues, nutritional questions, family issues related to D... I can go on and on!! We always leave with a free meter, or test strips or other gadgets. Absolutely every question I have before the appointment gets addressed!!

    Don't settle for less. Your endo should be "pro-parent" and your # source for information and support relating to D. Their goal should be the same as yours- providing you with the best possible tools and systems to manage your child's D.

    Good luck!!
     
  14. Mommaof7

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    Well, I immediately contacted our CDE and the peditrician to tell them about the endo. Apparently the way Kaiser in Hawaii works is, well, the endo is just a "token" appt. They only have one ped. endo and they had heard he wasn't so great before also. They don't have much choice. Good news, he really has no control over the pump, it's all my CDE and she is very Pro Pump. So she is getting me set up with some Pump people and seminars to get going, at least to get more informed. Apparently, the most important person I'll be seeing is my CDE, she has the most pull.

    Oh, I did find out a little more about how poor of a Dr. this endo was. He didn't even notice that Zech's c-peptide results weren't there. Apparently they were ordered when he had all his blood work done a month ago, but the lab never ran the test. I guess the was Kaiser works, this is one of the most important labs results and the endo should have noticed that the results wasn't even there. Apparently Kaiser won't even let someone go on the pump until they have the results from this lab test.

    I'm so thankful I went with my gut! I'll keep you all posted!
     
  15. lisalotsamom

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    Your dr thinks a 5-6yo boy will not get sites pulled out as much as a 3yo? Has he ever *met* a 5-6yo boy?? Two of my sons are past this age, and from my memory, they just get more active and rougher as they get older.
    Our daughter was diagnosed at 18 mos, and pumping at 34 mos--just before she turned 3yo. She's never batted an eye at the site changes, and plays hard with her siblings, swims alot, etc. I know sites can get pulled out, but it still beats injections. She has never minded getting her blood sugar checked, but was starting to hate the injections.
    There is no better therapy for young children and control than pumping, imo. You can give very small doses as frequently as you want to, and most importantly ---- you can feed the child instead of the insulin. Kids are notorious for not wanting to eat at specific times or specific amounts of carbs, and you won't have any better flexiblity than with a pump.
    Research it, and if you feel that pump therapy is the best option for your son and your family's needs, then push for it. Your dr is supposed to work *with* you , not dictate everything.
     
  16. lisamomtotwins

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    My daughter went on the pump at 17 months! She is soo active and hyper and the pump has been amazing for her. Just the fact of no shots and controling the ups and downs and dont wanting to eat or wanting to eat more, is an amazing thing!
     
  17. MikeG

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    Tommy has had a pump since he was 20 months. We were very worried about going to the pump because Tommy likes to touch! He wears a back pack for his pump and occasionally the waste pouch. Either way, he is very good with the pump and it is much, much easier on Tommy and us.
    Your endo seems to have lost his grip on the reality of life with diabetes!!!
     
  18. sam1nat2

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    Activity shouldn't be a factor NOT to get the pump!! I have an 8 year old ds who was very active as a toddler, but the activity is waaayyyy more now!! Sure he has kinked the sets, but we stay on top of things and if the set looks to be bad, we give a shot and yank it. We do this more than the average pumper, but then again, my boy is more active than the average kid.

    On a daily basis, he dives on the couch countless times "catching the touchdown", drives his bike off of jumps, wrestles anyone who is up for the challenge, climbs fences (yet to pull out a set doing this), plays tackle football. Then there are the baseball games/practice. He has a great slide/dive move, the crowd cheers and I cringe wondering if he kinked the set (hasn't happened yet).
    Our worse set times are swimming as they seem to loosen and come out, but I'm sure that can be solved with mastisol when I get around to getting it.

    ds plays on sports teams with the minimed reps ds, rep says that my ds is one of the more active kids he has known and is very impressed with how the pump works for us.

    I suppose if it is a problem, you could always go back to mdi, but let them know that as the momma, you want it and you are willing to take the risk.
     
  19. D-Dad

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    Rankings

    If you know what's good for you, Father outrank doctors and are slightly below mothers.
     
  20. khannen

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    Shealyn was diagnosed a week after her 3rd birthday and pumping about 2 mths later. I was quite concerned about hear leaving the pump alone and having a site pulled out. We drilled into her that the pump was not a toy and that she shouldn't push the buttons "or she won't feel well". Thank God for the lock out feature as well, but I've never seen her try to mess with it. From time to time, I'll see her tucking a bit of the tubing back into the waist pouch.

    As for sites being pulled... She once got hung up on her baby brother's bouncy seat and ran across the room to avoid a bug. That 24 inches of tubing stretched to about 8-10 feet long!!! Lol... I was in a panic. I expected her to have pulled it out and been bleeding everywhere. Umm nope... it didn't snap OR get pulled out. I changed the tubing out anyway for my sanity's sake but the infusion site itself continued to work just fine!

    The Endo's reasons aren't good enough in my mind! I am sooooooooo thankful we were put on a pump early. It's a lot of work in the early days, but it allows us to have much better control and it's easy to see she feels much better now.
     

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