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Pump died, little help, please

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by hypercarmona, Aug 27, 2010.

  1. hypercarmona

    hypercarmona Approved members

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    I was told that my pump is not to be used, that the piston is either over or under priming the cartridge. (Or a little bit of both)

    I've got plenty of lantus, and I know that I'm supposed to take a little bit through a syringe every few hours until I can take the lantus (8pm). What's tricky is how much and when.

    I called the doc's office and got "Um, you're supposed to call the diabetes center for questions about the pumps". (I've yet to get a phone call for an appointment to the fabled Diabetes Center, and it's been nearly a year. They keep telling me they'll call.) I tell her that it's not a question about the pump, the pump is dead, and I have a question about insulin to take in the meantime. She told me that she'd ask a doctor and call me back. It's been nearly an hour. My BG was 172 at that point (I was in the middle of a site change when my pump died, old site was bleeding into the tubing.) and I'm 177 right now.

    So, to the experts, the last time I had pump training I was told to take my 4x my regular basal, every four hours. But at that time I was on humalog. Is the protocol different for Apidra? Is there a more current, different method?

    My basal rate is 0.200U/hr, I take a total of 4.8 units a day for basal, which means less than 1 unit for a four hour timespan.

    Would it be better to split it into a half unit every two or three hours, to guage how it hits me? The last thing I need right now is to take a full unit and have the whole thing hit me at once. DH doesn't get home until 6pm, and the only other ones here are my boys.

    ETA: In the middle of typing this, they called and told me to take a unit, if I wanted to, at some point before 8pm, but to make sure I eat a whole lot to prevent going low. Great advice. This is why I don't call and ask for help, ever. I keep picking winners. I told her the whole "pump is only using fast-acting insulin, in five hours I'll like be in the beginnings of DKA, how is the extra insulin optional?" speech, and she couldn't understand what the issue was.
     
  2. emm142

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    I'd do half a unit every 2-3 hours. I'm guessing that your ISF is pretty high with basals that low, and Apidra is so fast, it could be really dangerous to take 4 hours worth at once.
     
  3. sarahspins

    sarahspins Approved members

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    I would just take your Lantus now.. assuming you'll get your replacement pump tomorrow (I got mine from Animas on a Saturday), you can just time your basal re-start for whenever you gave the Lantus, it doesn't need to be at 8pm or anything arbitrary.

    When my pump failed (buttons fell off, it was not usable) that's exactly what I did.. and it wasn't a big deal. If I know I am going to be back on MDI for more than a day then I worry more about the timing, just for convenience sake... I've flip flopped a lot this summer, so it's almost become routine.
     
  4. emm142

    emm142 Approved members

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    Just a question, because I've never properly done the pump/lantus switch before (only done a partial dose of lantus). Lantus takes about 5 hours to kick in, right? Do you generally require a shot of rapid to cover those hours? I know that if I went for 5 hours with no basal my BGs (and ketones, for that matter) would be in the stratosphere.
     
  5. hypercarmona

    hypercarmona Approved members

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    They told me today that my pump fell out of warranty last month (wasn't expecting that until Nov.; I mixed up the dates), and I was told that it'll be monday or tuesday when I get the loaner. But I figure that this will be the last time for a long while that I use an insulin pump.

    Most of the time when I switch, I don't take the pump off until an hour after I take the lantus, to give it time to work. I have zero experience with a pump failure like this. The last time a pump crapped out on me, I was taking lantus on the side. This is entirely new and sucks pretty hard. But at least I'll know for next time.


    Thanks, that's what I was thinking, too. I figure that I'll wait until I've topped 200 (or probably another hour whichever comes first), and then take a half unit, which normally means a 90 point drop. That should limit the potential for a serious drop.
     

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