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Poll - at what BG levels does your child experience "bad lows"

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by wilf, Sep 6, 2010.

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At what blood sugar levels does your child typically experience "bad lows"?

  1. over 80

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. 70-80

    1 vote(s)
    1.4%
  3. 60-70

    7 vote(s)
    10.1%
  4. 50-60

    17 vote(s)
    24.6%
  5. 40-50

    29 vote(s)
    42.0%
  6. 30-40

    10 vote(s)
    14.5%
  7. under 30

    5 vote(s)
    7.2%
  1. albasmom

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    I couldn't check it either. I don't think in 3 years that she has ever had a symptomatic low. Our lowest low was 1.8 (32) and she was running around like normal. I however nearly had a panic attack :cwds:
     
  2. StillMamamia

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    May I ask what can we deduct from the poll? YDMV??
     
  3. wilf

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    This captures my views on this exactly. :) Nicely summarized! :cwds:
     
  4. wilf

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    We can deduce not only that YDMV (different kids will experience bad lows at different blood sugar levels), but with respect to bad lows YDMV from one occasion to another for the same child.

    I am in agreement with Darryl, that the worst lows are likely due to prolonged periods of low blood sugars. So spending hours with low BG levels in the 50s is likely worse than a brief, sharp drop to the 30s that is detected and treated immediately.
     
  5. saxmaniac

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    Alex has never had any symptomatic low that can be termed "bad". I didn't check anything, unless you revise the poll to say "no bad symptoms". He will say "I feel a little off-balance" if asked when he happens to be in 50's but that's not "bad".

    He's been in the 30 a few times, and merely was laying on the floor playing quietly.

    He was LO once, with no symptoms whatsoever, but he was in bed.
     
  6. kiwiliz

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    DD has been perfectly coherent at 34, but knew she was low. I was discussing this with another mum with a daughter with Type 1 who is now an adult and she said that it depended on how quickly she was dropping. Her worst seizure happened at 90 (5) but she had been dropping from 360 (20). That would tie in with Daryls idea that it is the amount of insulin on board that affects the symptoms.
    Good to be aware of. Thanks everyone.
     
  7. Christopher

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    It is interesting because when I first came to this site I was told that it is the drastic dips or spikes that were "worse" then being high or low for a few hours. It would be interesting if we each asked our medical professionals and see what their responses would be.

    Additionally, I was told by Danielle's endo that the more lows she experiences the more likely it is that she will become hypo-unaware in the future. No idea if there is any truth to that.

    (I didn't answer the poll because there is so much variation in the way our children experience diabetes that it kind of makes it a moot point).
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2010
  8. Lawana

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    Are you attempting to distinguish between a symptomatic low that isn't "bad" and one that is?

    Dd feels her lows typically in the 60s. She has a hard time defining particular symptoms, however, and says she just feels "low." Shortly after diagnosis, her main symptom was vision changes, but she doesn't get that any more. Outwardly, she gets quieter than normal or irritable when she is low, usually in the 60s. Her lowest bg reading was in the upper 20s, but she just felt "low". She was coherent and cooperative. I would consider that a bad low by the number, but not by symptoms. She has never required anything other than juice or tabs to treat a low. She has never been so symptomatic that she wouldn't have been able to recognize the problem for what is was and treat herself.

    So I really couldn't answer the poll. Maybe another way to define a bad low is one that requires intervention by someone else. But that would only apply to older kids, as the younger ones always need assistance.
     
  9. Gracie'sMom

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    I said 60-70 as she has had a couple bad lows in that range. It is not consistent for her. She has been dizzy, confused, unable to check her own bg in the 60's twice.
     
  10. Flutterby

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    For Kaylee, its not the number, but the dropping.. She was totally out of it the other day at 36.. but she had a 24 where she was walking around.. confusion was JUST starting as she didn't know if the 24 was a 24 or 54, she's also never seen that low on the meter, so I think that threw her off.. She had a 32 once where she was totally out of it, couldn't stay awake, eyes rolling in the back of her head, couldn't hold her hands up.. I had to squirt the juice box in her mouth..
     
  11. joy orz

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    Ava had two episodes where she was asleep and went low and had trembles almost like when kids get goose bumps and are shivering. Not quite sure if that counts as a seizure or not. Both times the number was lower than 40. That was when she was first diagnosed and only a year old so she couldn't vocalize what was happening.

    Since then, sometimes she feels low, sometimes not.

    This week, we were at the grocery store, she seemed perfectly fine, but I happened to check the DEX (which had alarmed but I didn't hear it) and she was at 37 :eek: She was walking and acting fine.

    The following day, she was at 150 and starting to act cranky, and got irritated by everything easily. She went to 50 within the hour. In hindsight, she was going low. But her meter and cgm was reading that she was in the safe range, and her behavior was indicating other wise.

    So don't always rely on technology, and don't always rely on symptoms. Just always be on your toes.
     
  12. Flutterby

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    I have asked Kaylee's endo this exact question.. the answer I got was the prolonged high or low is more dangerous than the drop down and quick rise (meal spike we'll say..) then coming back into range.. I asked her more specifically a spike that goes up to 400 for 20min and then heads down vs. a high in the 200s for a few hours.. staying in the 200s for 2 hours does MORE damage then the quick spike... same as staying in the 50s for 2 hours does more damage vs. dipping into the 40s and coming back into range.
     
  13. wilf

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    Very helpful information, thanks! :)

    It makes sense intuitively.
     
  14. swellman

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    But is it supported scientifically?
     
  15. Christopher

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    I agree, logically it makes sense, I just wonder (like Swellman) if there is any science to back up the intuition. I will continue to search.
     
  16. chbarnes

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    Chris really feels when his BG is moving. So he can feel low when it is in the tnormal range but headed rapidly down, he gets week and his hands shake, but he really doesn't experience the other symptoms that Hanas lists. He has never had a seizure or lost consciousness. I think the fact he feels so awful so long before he gets there is somewhat protective. I answered 50 to 60, but that isn't quite accurate.

    Chuck
     
  17. MikailasMom

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    I think that was the most terrifying experience EVER! I will never forget our low like that. It made me want to raise our goal number and range but endo convinced me that sustaining the higher numbers is more of a silent slow killer. I think everyone on here wants to do the best thing for thier kid and seeing them this low or seizure low may be so traumatic for them that they are not willing to get too close to the edge for the risk of falling off again. Me personally, I am of the opinion that since we still have the goal of 70-110, usually trending in the 80-90 range exept at night that dilligence is necc. to avoid quick or sustained lows (part of the reason for 2 hour checks when our sensor isnt reliable). I would rather do things this way now than explain to her that my descisions caused her kidney damage, loss of vision ect, down the road. But each family is different, just because one management style works for one doesnt mean it works for all, but that doesnt mean that people cant ask questions and post what works for them. If it helps just one other person feel more comfortable about their descisions, then its a success.

    What happened to us all being in the same boat, just using different paddles?
     
  18. kiwiliz

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    Our paddles are determined by our past experiences.;)
     
  19. MikailasMom

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    Us too and also learn from others experiences. Thats why this board is so invaluable to us :)
     
  20. NomadIvy

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    Difficult to answer. She was fine yesterday at 33. Once the meter read 48 and she was, I believe, close to a "bad low". That's when she's almost screaming telling me she's shaky. This has happened 3x unfortunately, but not to the point where she's incoherent and not even showing the signs you mentioned... just that I know if left untreated for another couple of minutes, we'd reach that point.
     

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