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Pain in feet?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by rakgyk, Aug 23, 2014.

  1. rakgyk

    rakgyk Approved members

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    My son has had type 1 for 4 yrs now (he's 7). He's been complaining of pain in his foot and I'm not sure what to make of it. It was only in his left foot. He said it felt like his foot was burning (not the skin, inside his foot). I tried to massage his foot and stretch his toes, and he said it helped a little but it would move from one toe to another. He's had this pain before, but it only lasts less than a day then goes away. It only happened a few times. Has anyone else's child ever experience something like this? I can't even begin to assume what this could be from.
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Last thing I'd think of is anything D related.

    New shoes? Worn out shoes? New routine? Growing? New desk chair or anything that might be causing him to sit differently?
     
  3. rakgyk

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    His shoes are worn out (even though they're only 3 months old!). He is also growing quite a bit (close to 2 inches in 3 months). Unfortunately my mind always thinks about the worst case scenarios and it's worse with him because he has type 1.
     
  4. Lakeman

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    Worn out shoes at three months? Is the wear even or does it show a pattern? If it indicates that he is dragging one foot then maybe talk with your doc.
     
  5. rakgyk

    rakgyk Approved members

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    Not worn out with a pattern, he on,y wears sneakers, rarely anything else. He also like to stick his foot in his sneakers and let the back fold in (like slip ons). He's just really hard on them! But he hasn't complained since so I will just keep and eye on him and mention it at the next dr visit.
     
  6. moco89

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    Definitely not D related. Diabetes complications do not set in until after 5 years post-diagnosis (for type 1s) AND after puberty.

    There are less than 10 case reports (approximately) of "diabetes complications" (for type 1s) at diagnosis, which suggests more unusual things like (potentially rare) autoimmune diseases, rather than D complications.

    I had autonomic neuropathy at diagnosis, although it was subtle, and that was one of the ways we were able to determine that my neuropathy was not diabetes-related. I did test positive for an antibody that causes autoimmune autonomic neuropathy, though.

    I hope this helps.
     
  7. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Absolutely the norm around here - they get wet, they get the back smashed down for rushing, they get worn every day (at least part of the day). I've given in, learned to find the outlet mall and buy 3 pairs of sneakers at a time. :tongue:
     
  8. nebby3

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    I remember hearing this when my dd was dx almost 11 yrs ago but do they still say it? I thought they didn't. It doesn't seen like it could be true, esp that there is a free pass till puberty for kids like my dd who were dx very young. In my completely uneducated opinion control at those young ages still matters and lack of control can have consequences.
     
  9. kiwikid

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    That's rather a broad statement... Rachel has been on ACE inhibitors since she was 8 for microalbuminuria... granted that is more than 5 years after diagnosis, but definitely before puberty. No causes we could find other than diabetes, and I consider myself a very conscientious D Parent... Good HbA1c's, but bad luck?
     
  10. missmakaliasmomma

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    I thought that was pretty broad too. I was always told not to worry too much about potential complications in childhood, just focus on trying to have the best control you can have to prevent any complications. Out of 4 adult diabetics we know, one has issues. She regrets not taking care of herself and completely blames her complications on her lack of care. She told me her "normal" bg was 300 and she'd be up to 700 alot. A1c was in the 11s for awhile. Now that's very bad control and an invitation for complications.

    Your daughter might just have that "bad luck" It happens to the best of us, no matter how much we try to take care of ourselves.
     

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