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overwhelmed

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by myshell, Sep 9, 2014.

  1. myshell

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    My son was diagnosed over a year and a half ago and I still feel overwhelmed.He understands how to manage his diabetes and does a good job, however, he is still so afraid of going low that he tends to try to keep his BG above range. His range is 80-120. We have tried to make him understand the long term problems of keeping higher numbers.Endo appointment tomorrow. Will we ever feel like experts at this? The long term effects really scare me.
     
  2. kim5798

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    Twelve is a hard age. Diabetes is hard too. Have you considered having him talk to a therapist? Your diabetes clinic may have this service available or at least be able to point you in the direction of someone who works with children and understands diabetes. I think while you need to be aware of long term effects, worrying about them is not going to do anything for you or your son. Try to take each week a day at a time. Pick one thing to work on regarding the numbers...for example good overnights, since that is half the hours in the day, and try to get that under control first. Then work on the next "problem" area. Of course, keeping in mind that diabetes may decide to change the plan on any given day...
     
  3. sszyszkiewicz

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    I am also the class of 2013 and have a 12 year old. Can you get a dexcom G4 ? It really provides alot of comfort knowing what the number is for those that want to know what the number is. Also 80-120 is really tight (some might say wishful thinking). If your 12 year old is anything like mine, with activity he gets fast drops. They can be scary to a kid. They can ruin a pickup game of basketball, or soccer if you dont see them coming. he has learned to run a little higher to prevent those I bet. Whats the range that you are seeing?

    Is he stable at night meaning that you have his lantus just so to keep him steady most of the night within your range?

    Also, the ADA has set a goal of an A1C of 7.5 for kids. That number, by the way, represents an average of about 170, which is out of your range. So if you are less than 180 most times, that is actually pretty good.
     
  4. Cheetah-cub

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    I agree with sszyszkiewicz. 80 to 120 is a very tight and low range. Our target is 120, but our range is 70 to 180. It seems that your son is doing a good job taking care of his diabetes. Going low can be very dangerous. I too rather keep my DD a little higher rather than low. You didn't mention how high he tend to stay at, but we are happy to be under 180. We don't bother correct above 150.

    You have a doctor appt tomorrow, you will probably get a A1C number tomorrow. I think if your doctor and your family are happy with the A1C, give him a pat on the back, and don't stress out too much. Your son is doing good.
     
  5. wilf

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    It's the old Day Before the Endo Visit Butterflies. We've all been there and done that.

    The range you are aiming for is fine in theory, but not compatible with a 13 or 14 year old living his life. If his A1Cs aren't higher than the endo is comfortable with, then I'd let it be.
     
  6. Sprocket

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    My daughter is 12 and has a little over a year under her belt. I can relate. It's more me than her being afraid of lows. I tend to keep her a little higher too for more of a cushion especially when she's at school. I have to say that with time, I am becoming more aggressive with insulin dosing and experimentation with how things work, so I think some of it is just a matter of time. I was afraid she'd be higher at her last endo appointment because to me, she was running too high. As it turns out, her a1c dropped .2 points and she was 6.6 last week at her appointment. In our experience, it's hard to predict what the A1C will be. Your control may be better than you think.
     
  7. nanhsot

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    What is your insulin regimen? Pump or shots? Have you looked at CGM? For me the addition of CGM and pump was the game changer in feeling "like an expert", though that's not really true either...but it did give a measure of feeling like we could make changes in a more meaningful way (reduce basal when fighting lows vs a single shot of lantus hours before, etc).

    If you have not considered adding technology to your management, that's where I'd point you at this time. CGM is particularly helpful with the overnight fears, it gives you real data to see what's happening, and if your son allows (mine didn't, but is older) the receiver with alarms can be at YOUR bedside so he has peace of mind that you will wake up.

    Hope your appointment goes well.
     
  8. rgcainmd

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    I agree with nanhsot. Technology (specifically a pump and Dexcom CGM) enabled my daughter and I to gain much tighter control of her BGs. It's more work than using MDI, but well worth it IMO.
     
  9. jenm999

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    Using technology IS more work, I agree, but it's less stressful, in my opinion.

    Meal time: Instead of getting out a calculator and pulling up the dosing app, verifying that meal's carb ratios ("Honey, are we still doing 45 at lunch or was that before you talked to the nurse?"), prepping for a shot etc. all you have to do on the pump is know the carbs in the meal and your current BG. The math and the ratios are all done by the pump. You can set aside 15 minutes every few days to upload the data and review it, looking for patterns. No record keeping; the pump does it all too.

    CGM same thing. Yes, it's more work to insert the sensor, calibrate, etc. but if you're having a carb only meal without a correction, you can glance at the Dex and see that it's in range and go ahead and bolus. And the CGM offers sleep, glorious sleep!
     
  10. suej

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    I agree with Cheetah-cub - 80-120 not achievable in my house, is my wish list. Our range also 70 - 180 (day) and 70 to 140 (night). We find GCM so useful and reassuring, some one said should not let kids out of the hospital without one and I so agree. CGM's help you to have high lows and low highs and when working well really cushion some of the anxiety. My DS almost prefers a high low to a high, as it is quickly corrected. Hang in there and good luck.
     
  11. wilf

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    So how did the endo visit go? :cwds:
     
  12. myshell

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    Thanks for all of the advice. I appreciate it. The endo visit went really well. I feel more comfortable with our diabetes management. I was overreacting to the higher numbers. She said as long as bg stays below 195 not to worry and just treat the numbers. She answered a lot of questions and was very reassuring.
     
  13. sszyszkiewicz

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    That's great!
     
  14. Ali

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    Wonderful. Sounds like you have a good Endo.:smile: T1 is a long long race.
    Ali
     
  15. wilf

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    I wonder if it's a coincidence that so many Type 1s become distance runners or other endurance athletes?! :cwds:
     
  16. mwstock

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    Glad to hear that your doctors visit went well. I do agree with the other parents that the 80-120 may be desirable, but a little tight, especially if your son is experiencing lows during exercise. It probably best to let his blood sugars run higher during activity, so he is not having to fight the low blood sugars. Maybe give him a 15 carb snack before the activity or reduce the insulin given to cover the meal before the activity. It is frustrating to have the lows during activity. I would continue to focus on the short term and treat the numbers like the doctor said. If you are checking him regularly and treating the numbers, you should not have to worry about the long term. While I do think it is important for our children to learn how to take care of themselves, it is also important not to put too much of the decision and management on to them. My son does his blood sugar checks and even dials in the numbers on the pump, but my wife and I are still the decision makers. Of course my son is a few years younger than yours. Hang in there! I am glad you feel better about the diabetes management.
     
  17. msschiel

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    We are coming up on our 1 year anniversary in October. Been a long year already! Ds had great numbers all summer long. Since school started he has been all over the place, mostly higher! He is 11 1/2, so I am sure puberty has something to do with it, but sometimes I look at his numbers and wonder what in the world are we doing wrong? We are still doing MDI with carb counting. Sometimes I wonder if half units would do him better. We are looking into a CGM just to see what he is doing throughout the day and especially at night. Some mornings he wakes on the high side, but the next day he is near normal. Our daytime goal is 100 and night is 120. I try to keep him near 120 during the day at school as it seems to help him concentrate better. I hate D and it seems sometimes whatever you are doing right doesn't reflect the numbers. Really 80-120 is a difficult range for any diabetic, young or old. I am anxious to see what is A1C at his one year check up at the beginning of October.
     

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