- advertisement -

Our first fair experience. How do you do it?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by buckmarko, Jul 28, 2012.

  1. buckmarko

    buckmarko Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2012
    Messages:
    60
    Well, we've been at this for 9 months now and pumping for a little over 2 months. We still have some tweeking to do, but for the most part it's been ok. We decided to go to the state fair today. I wasn't quite sure how to dose his insulin? I was wondering about increasing basal, but thought against it since we were walking all day. Then after the numbers started to creep up a little, I did a 20% inc. for 6 hours. I feel like I counted carbs pretty accurately, but he still went up. We did try to space the food out. But obviously, we need to figure it out a little better. He wears a cgm so we were looking at it all day. Yes, we ate some junk food, but it's only one day a year, and we didn't go overboard. That being said, I'd still like to have a little better control. I was wondering, how do you handle days like this when there a lot of eating at fairs/festivals?
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    Well, what one wants and what one gets aren't always the same.:p

    If you only needed a 20% basal increase, only saw a little creep then it could well be the best fair day you'll ever have. ;) I don't mean to be difficult, it's just that you don't get to do things like this and have perfect numbers at the same time when you have D.

    You're only 9 months in; already pumping and cgm'ing, you are really well positioned to having great skills when the honeymoon ends and things get harder. Enjoy your relative success, pat yourself on the back for your preparedness and maybe, just maybe begin to accept that staying in range all the time just isn't possible.

    Live, bolus, correct, carry-on.:cwds:

    Just my 2 cents.
     
  3. zoomom456

    zoomom456 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2011
    Messages:
    340
    I wish I had a better answer for you, but to be honest we mostly wing it and correct if/when needed. I do a combo bolus for the food since it tends to be more fatty. A fair is so rare for us that I just accept there will be different numbers and see how it goes. I do think you are doing an amazing job if you went to a fair 9 months in and came out fairly calm.
     
  4. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    Read Sarah's post....then read it again. :D
     
  5. sarahspins

    sarahspins Approved members

    Joined:
    May 5, 2009
    Messages:
    2,205
    I agree... it's always going to be a challenge, and if you didn't get into any major trouble (stubborn lows or highs) then I'd still call it a success. Could it be handled better? Possibly, but what what cost?

    I firmly believe that it's okay to let things go a little and not stress out about them - birthdays, celebrations, and other excuses to have a great time definitely don't need to be extra stressful because of D. Perfection is not what you should aim for, but rather being able to make appropriate changes on the fly and avoiding anything really bad. And of course, that attitude is not appropriate for "everyday" management, but I truly don't believe that in the long run a day here and there where you don't stress out so much about staying in range is really a big deal.

    As far as food at these type things, I always do a "best guess" and add 25% to that number... it seems to work for me. Everything always seems to have more carbs at fairs and festivals... I'm not sure where they hide them, but I'm convinced they are there :)
     
  6. Tigerlilly's mom

    Tigerlilly's mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2007
    Messages:
    3,492
    Sounds like you did a great job to me!!! Counting carbs at fairs is realllly hard!

    There are special occasions that you have to just wing it sometimes, such as fairs, birthday parties, holidays, school parties.....you can't stress too much about things, just do the best you can and let you child have fun!

    Remember, you can always bolus for a high number, or if you see lows creeping in, there is plenty of fun food at places like these to treat the low!

    Sounds like you already have the "tools" needed to prevent his numbers from getting too out of control where they would effect his fun...so keep up the good work and have fun with him!

    ETA - we are 7 years in and still totally "wing it" at things like that!! We were at an amusement park all day last week, I barely saw him because we went with friends....he tested a "few" times (less than if I was with him), he bolused for his food...cheeseburger, fries, icecream and who knows what else, oh my! The only numbers I remember is that he was 160's before bed and when he woke up he was in the 90's (he slept at a friends house)
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2012
  7. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    Like everyone else said, you did great! It really is impossible to have great numbers at something like a fair. We call anything short of a complete disaster a success! :)
     
  8. danielsmom

    danielsmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2011
    Messages:
    798
    At knotts berry farm Daniel ran high all day.. I corrected...but he was pumped on getting on the rides and really the only "bad" food per se he had was the Funnel cake which I'm sure I under bolused...but we dealt with the day, and next day back to normal numbers back in range...Main thing was that he wasn't feeling rotten from the high and drinking tons of water.
     
  9. steph

    steph Approved members

    Joined:
    May 1, 2012
    Messages:
    177
    Love this. I totally agree. You go have fun, and you bolus and guess to the best of your ability. You check later and correct. Numbers may be a little off, but at the end of the day you went to the fair and had a blast. We are only 7 month in and on MDI, and while I would like my baby's A1C to be below a 7, I want even more for her to just be a kid. Glad you accepted the challenge of fair food and had a good time:). Sometimes good enough really is godd enough.
     
  10. buckmarko

    buckmarko Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2012
    Messages:
    60
    Thanks so much everyone. I didn't know if there was an "art" per se to days like this or not. We did underbolus some ( bg was 307 at one point), then overbolused at the end for one funnel cake that 5 of us shared. So, bedtime he was 55, and he didn't feel like eating at all :rolleyes:. He did get a few starburst down, but then I was correcting the high (220) in the middle of the night. I do have to admit, it is days like this that I HATE diabetes. It feels like it robs you of your freedom, I know you all know what I mean. I just wonder, will that feeling ever go away? He is still very private about it. He doesn't want people to see him do a check, he doesn't want to talk to friends about it at school. He doesn't mind people knowing, he just doesn't talk about it much. But he just told me tonight that he was glad I was his mom and was taking good care of him. Moments like that are a jewel and makes my heart melt.
     
  11. mysweetwill

    mysweetwill Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2011
    Messages:
    249
    Oh wow, this is exactly how my son is, very private about it. They are close in age and diagnosed around the same time too.
    we went to Universal last week and must have underbolused his lunch, he went superhigh and we needed to go to the first aid station to give him an injection to bring him down as pump corrections just werent moving him. We still had a fun day, but man, it really stinks when his day is interrupted by this nonsense - especially when I feel Im the one who messed up the carb counting....
     
  12. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    I'm just curious (we've never needed to override the pump site for an injection correction ) but what did the first aid station do for you? Did they provide the syringe? Or was he feeling sick from the high?
     
  13. sooz

    sooz Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2009
    Messages:
    2,330
    Jenna that is so sweet. What a moment to treasure. I don't know if the feeling ever goes away completely. It pops up at unexpected times when you see other kids enjoying things with such freedom. Other times, like when they have so much fun at D camp, and make so many friends it is actually a positive. I think also, when I hear of so many other kids having worse things, I'm glad it is "only" D, if you know what I mean. My littlest granddaughter was just Dx with nut allergies so I'm kind of more worried about that right now because it seems so potentially more immediately dangerous somehow. Probably isnt, but we are new to it. Thank you for sharing your sweet moment, it really does make your heart melt when you receive that.
     
  14. Joretta

    Joretta Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2009
    Messages:
    528
    I know we store our insulin there when we go. This way if she tests high we drink water on the way there and dose once there and drink more water on our way back to where we were. Also, storing insulin there on hot days help it last and we do not have to carry her extra supplies. They store it for free and let us fill a water bottle with cold bottled water for free. We only carry glucagon, meter, and something for a low.
     
  15. mysweetwill

    mysweetwill Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2011
    Messages:
    249

    They didnt do anything, but it was cool there and I could give him an injection in private. And yes, he was feeling a bit off so we took a break for half an hour or so there.
    Im curious now, since you said you never had to use an injection correction- we have found that he comes down quicker with an injection when over 250 then with a pump correction. Some other moms at my son's diabetes camp told me that sometimes that works better for stubborn highs so we only tried it just recently. I wonder if others here do that sometimes.
     
  16. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    I know that you are supposed to use an injection if you think the site isn't working - I pretty much know when it's the site, or if our screw-up is causing the high - then we either correct thru the existing site or change it out and correct.

    I've never really understood the idea that injections "work faster" ... like infusion sets are dubious? :rolleyes: No, the site's good or bad - good and it works, bad and you change it and the new one works, at least in our experience.

    And I was really just curious how well equipped the first aid stations were, I don't think I even saw one when we were there, but I know Disney never does anything small ;) Glad you had a place to catch a break and get some privacy. :cwds:
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2012
  17. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    We never correct with an injection. I don't think Jack has had a shot in 4 years. Like Sarah, we either correct through the current site or put a new site on and correct through that.
     
  18. caspi

    caspi Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2006
    Messages:
    5,134
    We've corrected via syringe a few times. It's a last resort when corrections aren't working. So we do a pod change, do a small bolus to get the insulin moving through the pod and then the rest of the correction via syringe. Works like a charm every time.
     
  19. Ali

    Ali Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,219
    I believe that the usual suggestion is to correct with an injection and then -right away-change the set out. I think it is to just get the insulin working while you are changing the set. My given rule by the "professionals" was for when corrections did not do the trick, then use a syringe and change the whole set-reservoir and all. The thought may also be that people may be out and about and take a bit of time to get home to change a site out. If corrections are not working I just change out the set and do not use a syringe, but yes if I do not have the stuff to change a set while out and about I use a syringe till I get home. :p:cwds:ali
     
  20. MommaKat

    MommaKat Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2011
    Messages:
    646
    This exactly. Our CDE said not to let a failed pump site ruin a day, but to switch to injections until we were home and could change the site. I have had to change her site in the car a time or two b/c it would just be too long / too many injections to replace basal for that time. But we have done this if a site goes bad and we're out for a short while.

    The nurse who taught our CGM class mentioned this to our group, and we have had times when corrections through the pump - old site or new, simply weren't budging BG. We've only done that twice, and she disconnects from the pump so that she can enter it through the bolus wizard and still have a record of the insulin on board. Then we reconnect and start a new site. It may seem like overkill, but dd feels so sick from highs that we need to get her down fast. It works for us... (Of course, we've dealt with a lot of failed sites. She was reacting to those, too. Now we change every two days.)
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice