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Ontario schools?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by cdninct, May 28, 2012.

  1. cdninct

    cdninct Approved members

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    I know there are several Ontario families on this forum, and I was hoping you could answer a few questions for me.

    I am from Ontario, and my children were both born there, but we have been in the US since diagnosis, so I am not familiar with anything to do with diabetes in Canada.

    We are considering moving back for the 2013-2014 school year. My son will be in SK, and he is on the pump. What have your experiences been with diabetes care for young kids in public schools? Where we are now, we would have a nurse on staff and a 504 plan in place to guarantee standards of care, but my sense is that there are fewer policies in place in ON. I've heard stories about people having to quit their jobs to give lunchtime insulin or put their kids back on NPH; we've been there, and I have no desire to go back! I'm hoping those stories are outdated, exaggerated, or represent the worst-case scenario that is the exception to the rule--am I right?

    Any information you can share would be appreciated. We really want to move back, but we are pampered in the care we receive now, and if schooling is going to be rough, we might just be forced to stay put until DS gets a bit older.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Deal

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    Unfortunately the schools are not forced to make accommodations for us but so far we have had a good run of teachers that were willing and capable of helping us manage. It's a case by case situation with some horror stories. Have a look at this great resource. http://www.diabetesinschools.ca/
     
  3. Mimi

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    I have to agree with the above poster. Because there is no legislation different school boards have different policies and individual schools within a school district can also vary.

    Schools in Ontario do not have school nurses. Teachers are not required to assist in medical care and are actually advised by their union to not give shots or glucagon for liability reasons.

    The Community Care Access Centre (CCAC) coordinates nursing care in my dd's school for her and another student with d. The nurse comes in twice a day (at the 2 eating times) to oversee BG check and carb counting. The nurses however will not enter info into the pump. They will only watch the child enter & confirm the correct numbers before the child presses ACT.

    However, the CCAC does not work the same everywhere, as I know there was another family on here who did not receive help in school from the CCAC.

    I've experienced very helpful teachers and ones that were not. Fortunately, I have no real "horror" stories to tell. Our school has been very accommodating and willing to help. Keep in mind though that I always knew what limitations I was up against to begin with.

    I think you'd really need to research the community you are looking to move to as well as, what type of assistance your child would need. My dd was in 2nd grade at dx. By the time she went to 3rd, she no longer needed a nurse to over see her BG checks or injections. This would be impossible with a 5 year old.

    Good luck. :)
     
  4. Helenmomofsporty13yearold

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    You will not get the kind of nursing care in schools here that you are used to. We tend to spend all our education budgets on paying teachers and principals very well. School nurses on staff disappeared a long time ago, but more and more CWD's are getting help from Public Health Nurses.

    There are lots of financial benefits here in Ontario that may allow you to not work or work less:

    Pumps are paid for by a provincial government program and $200 a month is given for supplies.

    Type 1's can get a Disability certificate and qualify for an extra $8,000 tax write off under Basic Personal Exemptions, over and above the usual dependent exemption of $8,000 and the Child Tax Benefit paid to caregivers monthly can include an additional supplement.

    There is also the Registered Disability Savings Plan that helps caregivers save for the child's future with generous help from the government in the form of contribution matching and grants.
    http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/ndvdls/tpcs/rdsp-reei/cdsg-eng.html

    There is a Trillium Program to help those with no private prescription coverage and of course the Universal Health Care.

    Another option is to enroll your child in a privately-funded school that has full time nurses on staff

    Here is an example of one:
    http://www.hsc.on.ca/on-campus/junior-school/facilities.html
     
  5. cdninct

    cdninct Approved members

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    That is really disheartening news. I taught in an Ontario public school for ten years before moving down here, but it was a small school, and we never had a CWD in the community. I know, though, that I would have never refused to help out with doing something that one of my students needed me to do, and I would like to think that there are many other teachers, principals, EAs and secretaries who feel the same way. At the same time, I hate the thought of appealing to the "kindness" of others for my child's basic medical care and safety. I will certainly contact CCAC and our local school and school board (York Region) and see how they handle things. I'm not sure how much good a CCAC nurse would be if he or she couldn't push the buttons on my five year old's pump, though.

    Helenmomofsporty13yearold--thanks for the other information. The programs and incentives are good to know about, but we would be coming up so that I could go back to teaching, so reducing hours or staying home is not an option. Besides, I am sickened that the school system and government would think it appropriate to tell me that I cannot work, or work full time, because my child has a disease that can be managed in school by a trained person. :mad:

    Deal--thank you for the website. Are you (or anybody else here) a part of the effort to develop legislation to protect our kids? I would really like to get involved, even from afar.
     
  6. Mary Jayne

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  7. ShanaB

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    That's my website :)

    And I have a daughter going into Jk in York region in September and have surprisingly found the support is in place. So far so good. Advocacy is dormant right now but I would really like to get going again.

    Send me an email or a pm and we'll chat
     
  8. Helenmomofsporty13yearold

    Helenmomofsporty13yearold Approved members

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    Shana, you are definitely the go-to person for this question!! It is just crazy that Ontario still has no policy in place a full year after New Brunswick put theirs in place. I am glad to hear you are finding support and I hope it won't be long before all parents are supported at all schools.
     

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