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OmniPod

Discussion in 'Adults with Type 1' started by singerjune77, Jan 1, 2016.

  1. singerjune77

    singerjune77 New Member

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    Jan 1, 2016
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    I am new to this forum. Perhaps there is an OmniPod page already, but I couldn't locate it. I have had Type I for 43.5 years now. I was a teen when diagnosed. No complications, but I am growing sick of insulin not infusing via my Medtronic 530G with Enlites. The Enlites (worn in my buttocks) work magnificently, but between site failures an air bubbles in reservoir, I am about to lose it. I hate the high blood glucose levels this causes. I HAD been on the old OmniPod in 2007, all was good for awhile, then I started to have skin irritation, and also some insulin absorption issues since I think the trainer from my endo's office had slacked off when it came to talking about site rotation. I am giving serious thought to trying the new OmniPod via their "cut the tubing" program. Wonder if there are any happy adults out there who wear the OmniPod and the DexCom (or mothers of kids with those devices.) Thanks a million! June
     
  2. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

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    I have two comments: My 13-year-old daughter uses the OmniPod pump and Dexcom CGM. We get great results and love both, but we have not used any other pump or CGM. That being said, I would more quickly switch my daughter to a different pump before I would switch to a different CGM. Even HONEST Medtronic reps admit that the Medtronic CGMs are inferior products compared to Dexcom's.

    I mean no offense by what I am about to say, but based on your post, I assume you are anywhere from mid-50s to mid-60s in age. If you are not already aware, Medicare does not cover the costs of using the OmniPod pump. I mention this in the event you are over 65 or quickly approaching this age. (Additionally, Medicare does not cover the cost of using a CGM.)
     
  3. singerjune77

    singerjune77 New Member

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    Thank you for your prompt response! In fact, I am 59 years old. I do expect to have very good supplemental insurance, after I retire, unless NJ's illustrious Governor Christie makes that impossible. I should be able to get lifetime health insurance beginning at age 62. I am aware of Medicare's not covering the Pods, nor CGMs, but I believe I have "met" people online whose supplemental, employer-provided health insurance covers CGMs. Thank you again!
     
  4. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

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    We got my daughter the Omnipod through Cut-the-Cord while she was wearing the Medtronic as an option for water days. She liked it and wore it most of the time for a bit last winter, but she's found she prefers tubed pumps and now has a T-slim. With the exception of the remote, we find that the T-slim has the best features of the Medtronic and Omnipod combined.

    Switching from Medtronic to Omnipod, the feature I fell in love with most was the multiple basal profiles. It has SEVEN! We program her profile to 10% more, 10% less, etc. so that we can switch her for differently basal needs that don't appear to be short-term range. The flip side of that is that the temp basal only goes for 12 hours before kicking off (without alarms) that I found frustrating.

    If you're having site rotation problems, you might want to consider T-slim when your warranty is up, as well as Cut-the-Cord. Using the combination of both pumps keeps my daughter's site rotated better. She won't wear tubing on her arms, but that's the only place she'll wear the pod. It gives us more sites to rotate through with respecting her intense avoidance for reasonable reasons.


    The PDM is huge. Someone here refers to it as a brick, and it is. It is probably four times the size of the T-slim, which is mind boggling considering it doesn't even contain insulin.

    We had a really bad start with the Pod as far as failures (try virtually every pod for six weeks), but the quality has improved.

    The feature I absolutely HATE is that it has an alarm that cannot be turned off about checking BG. It alarms about 1.5-2 hours after a pod change. With all the pods that failed during nighttime corrections, that meant we were awakened a second time with every failure. It's a HORRIBLE design; for those wearing CGMs, there should be an optional off.

    We used the Medtronic CGM with Sof-sensor and switched when Dexcom G4 was released. We would never go back to Medtronic cgm. The difference is that huge. The Dexcom is so much easier to use, the company treats customers with respect and listens for development wishes, and they don't price things ridiculously (ie. Medtronic MySentry that cost more than the whole Dexcom system and wasn't covered by insurance).

    While we've never had the 530g shut-off feature, my daughter's friend wears it, and she said the 300s that result when it shuts off because of not alarming loud enough to wake her are awful. The Dexcom is nice because for difficult-to-wake sleepers (ie. teens), the receiver can alarm, the phone can alarm, and others can also be alarmed if needed but at lower thresh holds. While it's not nice to be up in the night, the human factor of deciding what course of treatment is appropriate that doesn't result in a day of feeling wretched is valuable in our opinion.

    As far as site problems: we never got occlusion alarms, not even once, on the Medtronic. The pod went into failure more, possibly due to some being due to that rather than all being mechanical failure. The T-slim alarms occlusions just as we're starting to see effects in her BGs. I'm still getting used to the frequency with which they happen, but I'm thankful to avoid the highs.

    When it comes down to it, they all deliver insulin in a way different than a syringe. I'd trial the Pod and see what you think.
     
  5. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

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    Regarding OmniPod: I agree, the PDM is a brick! But rumor has it that Insulet is redesigning the PDM and the new one, which is described as looking similar to the t-slim pump, is due out by late 2016/early 2017.
     
  6. singerjune77

    singerjune77 New Member

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    Jan 1, 2016
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    Thank you everyone! I am still undecided as to what to do. I got two sample Pods to wear, without insulin. Of course, that didn't tell me anything at all. And I'd have to break my Medtronic contract to and get two separate contracts: one for DexCom and another for OmniPod, and there would be no way to "trial" them both. I have a feeling, after almost 44 years of Type I, and because I'm slender, that I have fewer places into which I can infuse insulin. When it's absorbing well, my BG's are great, but at least twice a week I get an infusion SITE failure. It really stinks. UGH!!!
     

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