- advertisement -

nurse at school labeling a mom ... so angry

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by carcha, Jan 22, 2010.

  1. jules12

    jules12 Approved members

    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    Messages:
    2,333
    I agree with this -- the nurses job could be in trouble if others would hear her talking about another student and it got back to the parents. If my nurse did that, I would be meeting with the principal and the District nurse. Medical info and how they treat it at school should be private.
     
  2. clb1968

    clb1968 Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2007
    Messages:
    1,579
    20 years in and I am still explaining to family.:rolleyes:
     
  3. wvchinacat

    wvchinacat Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    957
    My DH, his sister and now our DD all have Type 1. My SIL was dx at age 12 (over 30 years ago) and she was taught all that - that she HAD to stay away from sweets. To this day even though she has been brought up to speed on new thoughts and developements in treatment - it is still ingrained in her to stay relatively sugar-free.

    My DH was dx about 18 years ago in his early 20s and was also taught the same thing. About 5 years ago both of them started on the Lantus/Humalog regimin but continued to stay relatively no-sugar . . .

    Then 18 months ago our DD was dx and we were taught that all carbs are the same - sugar, bread, pasta - the body does not distinguish - but what we have found is that the body does react differently - some have a quicker spike, some have a slower spike - but all carbs make her bg spike . . .we treat her body the way her body would if it had a working pancreas.

    When people say this to me (it happened today - our cheerleading coach said to us - Mrs Shawl - next week I would like to bring a special treat for the girls for working so hard but I know Willow cannot have sugar - should I bring her something sugar free?) I replied simply - she can have ANYTHING that the rest of the girls have - it just helps if I know the carb count - anything pre-packaged will have a carb count on the package - if not I can usually figure it out. At this point she replied very kindly - that she thought maybe even pretzels would be better than sugar - I kindly replied - that I treat her body the way her body would do it if her pancreas worked - and thanks for thinking of us - but she really can have anything that the other kids have . . . At this time another mom chimed in - well my dd has XXX allergy . . . so I was off the hook and she was on to someone else.

    I used to get very frustrated when people did not understand that we can let Willow eat just like any other kid - bc most people do not research daily, and live with it daily and most do not understand that dialy management has changed so drastically in recent years . . .even doctors and nurses . . . Once I made a comment to my SIL about getting frustrated that people made these comments and she put me in my place (so to speak) she reminded me that when she was 12 she COULD NOT eat the cake at parties, that her mom daily made specific meals for her, and that it has been very hard for her to change her thinking . . . and for me to back down - I am probably as overwhemling to other as they seem to me when I try to educate . . .

    This is a perfect opportunity to offer your school nurse a copy of Pink Panther or Using Insulin . . .

    Good Luck
     
  4. mom2two

    mom2two Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,486
    I have some teachers in the family and I was shocked to hear how they talk about some parents. I even have one complaining about a family that has a child with Type 1 and that they bring in to many juice boxes!

    This woman clearly does not get it, maybe give her this forum to learn more!
     
  5. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    I was thinking the same thing.

    Ever heard the saying "can't teach an old dog new tricks?" This is exactly what I'm thinking as I read this post.
     
  6. deafmack

    deafmack Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2006
    Messages:
    3,209
    Actually the nurse broke HIPPA Laws and could be in a great deal of trouble. I see this happen alot because I am Deaf. For some reason people think I will not find out when they do this, but they forget I always have an interpreter with me when I go to the doctor's or the dentist, etc and my interpreter will let me know everything that is going on.
    At this point I would inform the nurse privately that she has no business talking about another student's medical condition no matter what it is and how that student is treating it and then leave it at that.
     
  7. deafmack

    deafmack Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2006
    Messages:
    3,209
    I understand. I am use to including everything whether it has sugar or not. If it raises blood sugars I count it. But I do have friends, Deaf of course who have had D for over 50 plus years and they still go by the no sugar rule. I understand this way is ingrained into their way of life and I figure if it works for them, that is good enough for me.
    What I find more frustrating is when someone comes up to me and oh, you are diabetic then you should not eat sugar. That is why I want a shirt that says, " My doctor prescribed this for me."
     
  8. Emma'sParents

    Emma'sParents Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2008
    Messages:
    19
    Not all "old school" school nurses are the same. We are blessed with a very understanding, competent and proactive school nurse for Emma. Fran understands carb counting and advocates for the D children in her care at the school (i.e. making sure the cafeteria properly publishes the nutrition info on each item, etc.). We will sorely miss her when Em moves on to another school in a few years. Em is now @ 7yo & checking her own sugar and operating her own pump (w/ supervision). This will make losing Fran a little easier.
     
  9. swellman

    swellman Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2008
    Messages:
    3,544
    This is gold. Thanks so much. There is nothing more I can add but to say that this made my day.
     
  10. Connie(BC)Type 1

    Connie(BC)Type 1 Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2005
    Messages:
    3,388
    Tell the nurse to go back to diabetes school, then she can teach the diabetes educators and educated!
     
  11. Heather(CA)

    Heather(CA) Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2007
    Messages:
    10,153
    I see your new to the forums, WELCOME...I love you already:D. That mom is lucky to have you around so that you can have her back. Go set the nurse straight!:D;)
     
  12. Toni

    Toni Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    Messages:
    2,882
    Well you can TRY to set the nurse straight. Some of them have opinions that do not change. Good luck.
     
  13. Mom2Michael

    Mom2Michael Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2009
    Messages:
    61
    Isn't it amazing that we have to educate the person the schools have hired to treat our kids? As I told our superintentent and principal when we were going thru the whole "I insist on a permanent nurse, not someone different everyday" issue - This school distict better get their act together, there are some 40+ kids diagnosed with type 1 everyday in the US. You're going to have to get educated about it, better sooner than later!


    Stats here: http://www.jdrf.org/index.cfm?page_id=102585
     
  14. carcha

    carcha Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2009
    Messages:
    110
    Thanks, everyone, for your advice and support. I just spoke with the nurse about our conversation from Friday, and I'm happy to say it went pretty well. I decided to be very calm and began the conversation by letting her know that my daughter was recently diagnosed with T1, which surprised her. I then offered some basics on the education I received in the hospital about food and insulin. She was quiet, and to her credit she did not try to argue against everything I said. She said that what I was saying was "interesting" and admitted that maybe things had changed since the last time she'd dealt with a new diagnosis. I encouraged her to let mom know that I'm in the building and available to talk at any time if she would like that. So, hopefully I made a little headway there.

    Now . . . I have to leave work early and pick up my daughter for our first appointment with the endocrinologist since getting out of the hospital. We've met with the team twice, but this is the first visit with the dr. Very nervous, although I'm not sure why. Wish us luck!:D
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice