- advertisement -

Not as exciting as a cure, but close…

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by DavidN, Nov 9, 2014.

  1. DavidN

    DavidN Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2012
    Messages:
    744
    This morning my son came downstairs with all of his supplies and he had already checked his BG, corrected and calibrated the CGM. We've been at it for over 2 years and this is a first. We don't push too hard to protect against resentment/rebellion. There is a tad of sarcasm in this post but not much. I was genuinely excited that he did this on his own without me asking. Just wondering where other stand regarding D responsibilities.
     
  2. wilf

    wilf Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2007
    Messages:
    9,652
    We always did as much of the D management as DD wanted us to. I never saw the sense in pushing anything on her.

    I will say though that we made sure when she was your son's age that she could do everything she needed to be able to do to take care of herself before letting her go on sleepovers.

    In the meantime it is 8 years since diagnosis, and she has moved far away from home for work and is managing things very satisfactorily by herself. :)
     
  3. valerie k

    valerie k Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,510
    15 year old boy, non compliant as heck, tearing my hair out by the roots. I should be bald by next week. By his own actions as of late, we are now starting to go from the beginning and doing most ourselves or having to "watch" him do it. Worst actions, not bolusing for eating. The next, lying about numbers.... Cant seem to get it though his head, the meter and pump don't lie. AAARRRGGGGGG!!!!!
     
  4. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    Ya, it always blows my mind when my daughter does something like this :)
    We too are of the school, make sure she knows how to do everything so that she can deal with it when she's away, but if she asks nicely, we will do whatever is needed when we are together. We still do nighttime checks, though when my parents are here, or she goes to a friends, she will do it all on her own.

    We want her to be responsible and independent, but not completely reliant at this age. I know of a parent in the area who will not allow their 14 year old to do anything on his own. It is so bad that if he is upstairs and he feels low, he will bang on the floor or call her on her cell phone. She won't let him have a CGM because she doesn't want him to have to deal with another site, she won't let him go to camp because she doesn't want him to feel intimidated by other kids with d. Now, this is extreme, and mom needs some serious help, but it's a good example of independent vs. reliant!
     
  5. mamattorney

    mamattorney Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2013
    Messages:
    1,076
    Some days I just let the chips fall, some days I'm more proactive. Yesterday, her cgm was alarming high for two hours before she even glanced at it. Too many licks, bites and tastes when making cupcakes!
     
  6. DavidN

    DavidN Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2012
    Messages:
    744
    I guess it would become "white noise" to me too if I heard it beeping and chirping 24/7.

    A couple weeks ago a T1D friend of my son was sleeping over at our house. He is MDI and his Dex sensor came out. His Mom has always changed it. My son went and got one of his own sensors and inserted it for his friend. That was pretty cool.
     
  7. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    At home, we do most everything. At school, he doesn't want to be bothered with the nurse, so he does things like test and treat in the room, and dose for snack in the room, but he still goes to her for lunch (it's on the way, anyway). He does great at friends' houses and things like birthday parties. Baby steps. :)
     
  8. BarbDwyer

    BarbDwyer Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2014
    Messages:
    181
    My 13yo knows how to do the basic things himself. He tests, doses, etc.

    He 'forgets' to test before he goes places. That means he doesn't feel like it and doesn't see it as important. He sometimes forgets to take his stuff with him when going on short trips - which is a big deal because he's walking with friends etc. Sometimes he honestly forgets - sometimes he just doesn't think it is a big deal. This is my biggest concern. He is very good about testing and doing the shots at meals and snacks etc. if he is at school or before I get home.

    He's very oppositional by nature so I'm trying to walk a fine line of not kicking in that defiance and rebellion. He is following the rules that were initially set but is being very resistant to some things such as - planning a meal and dosing prior to eating or even half way though, looking at what he eats and/or how much he eats as affecting his blood sugar, etc., doing extra tests to see how the food is impacting his blood sugar, etc. I plan to email the doctor before we go to our next appointment with some topics that he can address with use.

    I wake him up to test at night. I've offered to just test him (I don't think he'd wake up if I did it) but he is not on board with that. He would never wake up on his own though. We have not had to deal with him staying overnight with a friend or anything yet.
     
  9. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2008
    Messages:
    6,030
    That is as exciting as my 9 year old getting up early before the 6 year old and waking me up and sying, my number on the CGM is 120 so I don't need a correction right now. can I turn on the TV?

    Hopefully it is not a fluke and she sees the benefit of correcting a BG above 120 before breakfast, even if she is not hungry for breakfast for awhile.
     
  10. quiltinmom

    quiltinmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,189

    I hope you let him know how cool it was. :). Nothing like a little praise to get them to keep doing something.

    It sounds like you are on the right track. :)


    My 12 year old can technically do all d stuff in his own. I haven't touched his pump in months (aside from helping with site changes). He can change his site by himself, although I help when we are in a hurry--usually I just fill the reservoir and maybe the tubing. I have let him go on overnight camping trips (the most recent two included bike riding, which was kinda scary, but he took good care of things). What I do mostly is remind, remind, remind! Almost to the point of nagging, which line I try really hard not to cross. And he usually doesn't wake for night checks, so if I want one done, it's up to me (As it should be at this point). Once in a while we have a situation that we talk through to decide what to do (like last night...he was slightly low, but he had eaten pie which makes him high, but he had been active, which makes him low, so we had to figure out how much to correct.) That's about where we are, 5 years past dx.
     
  11. andiej

    andiej Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2013
    Messages:
    193
    My 11 year old only diagnosed at xmas. He is able to do everything he needs to, and acts responsibly on sleepovers etc, however on a day to day things, i like to do as much as i can to alleviate the burden, lately he's got a bit lax at school at doing the mid morning test etc....last week we brought a new product on the market the Freestyle Libre, think it's only available in europe at the moment it's not quite a cgm as you have to scan the sensor for results and no alarms, but it's much cheaper and gives us so much information for between scans etc, CGMS have to be self funded here in the UK. Its proved to be amazing and he is scanning regularly because it's so easy compared to a poke, also no need to wake him to poke at night we just scan, this has made things much easier for us and him, also means i can take more responsibility from him, as i don't want him to burn out or rebel.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice