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No takers for subsidised insulin pumps

Discussion in 'Australia' started by Ellen, Oct 22, 2010.

  1. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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  2. lisab

    lisab Approved members

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    When the scheme was first announced.....it seemed like it was a great scheme to help those without health insurance to have the opportunity to purchase a pump. Upon further investigation...to qualify for the scheme.....the family income must be under X amount annually and then the level of funding towards the purchase of a pump is scaled depending on income. Maximum funding is I think from memory....around $2,500 AUS so therefore another $6,000 odd is required towards the purchase of the pump.

    The scheme is aimed towards very low income and unfortunately those on that level of income would find it difficult to finance the remaining cost of purchase. Therein lies the reason why there has been a low uptake - most wouldn't qualify for the scheme and others wouldn't be able to afford the out of pocket expense.
     
  3. miss_behave

    miss_behave Approved members

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    I think one would be better of getting the basic minimum hospital cover from PHI. Anyone know approximately how much basic health cover is? They would then have the pump covered 100% after a year. Medtronic provides loaner pumps during the waiting period so you don't have to wait.

    I'm lucky that my parents have top Medibank cover and I can stay under it until I'm 25 if I'm studying. Its really sad that the government subsidises pump supplies under the NDSS but won't cover pumps for public patients. I'm pretty sure the NHS covers them in the UK.
     
  4. lisab

    lisab Approved members

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    Our family Health insurance costs just under $5000 a year for top cover.

    I know of families who are unable to afford full family insurance and take out insurance for the child with diabetes......costs approx $25/week for top cover. It is definitely a more viable option financially than to utilise the pump scheme.

    I would like to see the scheme provide fully funded pumps to kids in need!
    Sad to know there is still approx 4.5 million dollars funding sitting idle:(
     
  5. emm142

    emm142 Approved members

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    It will, but you have to fulfill pretty strict criteria. If you're over 12 years, the NHS will cover insulin pump therapy if:

    The guidelines are more relaxed for children under 12:

    (Link to document: http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/index.jsp?action=byID&o=12014)

    I'm glad that the NHS fully covers insulin pumps if you fit these guidelines. :) Otherwise I'd be pump-less, and the pump has totally changed my life. Subsidising the pump by such a small amount doesn't seem like it would cut it for people on a low income, so it's no wonder that the scheme isn't generally used. I hope that national healthcare services experience over time the long term cost benefits of pumping, and start to cover them readily for more people.
     

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